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deltask8er
06-25-2010, 04:16 AM
More hotels are cutting back on housekeeping services. With their business sharply reduced, hotels are looking to save money by urging customers to forgo daily changing of linens, towels and toiletries.

The trend isn't new, but the urgency is spreading to more chains as the industry battles a historic downturn in travel. Hotels market their new housekeeping approach as a "green" effort, and some analysts and travelers say the spin has merit.

http://www.usatoday.com/travel/hotels/2010-06-23-1Ahotelcleaning23_ST_N.htm


Some hotels give financial incentives. The Marmara Manhattan Hotel in New York offers a $20-a-night discount to customers who go without housekeeping for three days. "The green rate" applies only to those who book at least three nights on its reservation system.

Bjorn Hanson, of New York University, says customers aren't buying the industry's "green" argument but are generally accepting modest cutbacks in housekeeping. "The long-term trend (for companies) is to look for ways to make hotels more affordable and accessible," he says.


What's next, a welcome kit with cleaning products to use to clean the room? :P

Actually, if it means strangers will be traipsing through my room (and my things?) less often, that's a plus, too. And I can't really sleep in at a hotel, even if I put up the 'do not disturb' sign. I can hear the housekeeping staff working in the hall, and I don't want to throw off their clearning schedule :shuffle: .

nerdycool
06-25-2010, 04:30 AM
It actually makes sense. Like it says in the article, it's absurd for me to demand new sheets every day. I don't change my sheets at home that often, so I don't need them on the road. Same goes for towels, though if there's a pool at the hotel, replacements for those are necessary.

reckless
06-25-2010, 05:07 AM
On the west coast and in Las Vegas, it is fairly customary for hotels to provide a sign in the bathroom that urges people to save water by hanging their towels. If the towels are hung up when housekeeping comes through, they will not be replaced.

bobalina77
06-25-2010, 05:12 AM
We don't do daily housekeeping at the hotel where I work. If you are staying for 6 or more nights we will do a mid clean approximately halfway through your stay and change the sheets and clean bathrooms etc. Of course if you need anything at all like extra towels etc we'll bring them to you, but our suites also have washers and dryers in them. Ours is a bit different though because they are classed as vacation "homes" that are owned by people and then we rent them out. Not time share.. it's a little different.

genevieve
06-25-2010, 05:15 AM
People aren't buying the "green" angle? Sure, it's probably motivated by $$ for the hotel, but reducing waste (including wasted water for washing linens) is a good thing.

I don't like having hotel staff come through my room anyway, so I'm all for it.

Angelskates
06-25-2010, 05:25 AM
I've never been in a hotel that didn't have a sign that said something like if you want new towels, please put your towels in the tub. It IS about reducing water and wastage. I have also never been in a hotel that changed sheets every day (and I used work in a 5 star hotel). It was usually after 3 days or on request. I'm all for it.

mysticchic
06-25-2010, 05:26 AM
Whenever I stay in hotels for more then 2 days I never have housekeeping. So I'll gladly take a discount for "going green"

essence_of_soy
06-25-2010, 05:39 AM
This reminds me of the study done a few years ago when Delta Airlines' financial dept. suggested that if they took one olive out of every salad served on their flights per year, they'd save themselves $100,000.00.

This isn't very green, but man, if I go to a hotel, I want to justify paying those prices.

zhenya271
06-25-2010, 06:16 AM
People aren't buying the "green" angle? Sure, it's probably motivated by $$ for the hotel, but reducing waste (including wasted water for washing linens) is a good thing.

I don't like having hotel staff come through my room anyway, so I'm all for it.

I keep the "do not disturb sign up" and hand them the towels and trash. I don't want them coming in and cleaning with their communal cleaning rags after I've already done my peace of mind cleaning with Clorox wipes.

We have a family of four. It would be a lot easier for us not to have to change our towels as regularly if we had more racks for hanging and airing out. I don't like the rack over the toilet.:scream: Sometimes, hangers in the closet works but not so much in winter when we need that space for coats and jackets.

I never use their toiletries except for the handsoap and if we have a lengthy stay, I buy some liquid soap. So definitely no loss there.

IceAlisa
06-25-2010, 06:56 AM
I actually refuse housekeeping most of the time. I don't need new towels and sheets every day and usually don't stay in hotels longer than 2-3 days. I bring my own hair products (which is going to be EverPure from now on! :D). Occasionally, if the hotel is nice and has a beautiful tub, I will call housekeeping for bath salts. That's it.

millyskate
06-25-2010, 07:54 AM
I stayed in a hotel for 3 months last year and the cleaner was the biggest luxury I've ever had :shuffle:
They didn't change sheets every night, when you wanted new ones you had to dump the old ones on the floor :lol:
But I LOVED coming home to a clean room every evening.

Japanfan
06-25-2010, 09:08 AM
I like coming back to a clean room as well, and clean towels and a nicely made bed - especially if we have food and drinks/dirty dishes in the room. But Mr. Japanfan is really uncomfortable with housekeeping services. He'll put the 'do not disturb' sign on the door and I'll take if off after him. :)

Usually we compromise and ask them to come in every few days. We can take out our own trash sometimes and there are usually enough towels for a few days. . .

At the last hotel we stayed in (in San Diego) there was a place to leave your housekeeping tips, pretty much a request. It was further incentive to keep our use of housekeeping services down.

Aimless
06-25-2010, 12:52 PM
The other side of this is cuts in employment for chambermaids, who are on the bottom of the social totem pole. A physically tough job (my back hurts just thinking about all the beds they make) and I shudder to think of the filthy scenes they must occasionally encounter. I always tip them generously. I could certainly do without housekeeping, but what will they do without their jobs?

Wyliefan
06-25-2010, 01:09 PM
This reminds me of the study done a few years ago when Delta Airlines' financial dept. suggested that if they took one olive out of every salad served on their flights per year, they'd save themselves $100,000.00.



I don't recall ever being on a flight where there were olives in the salads. In fact, now I think of it, I've hardly ever been on a flight where there were salads! :)

MOIJTO
06-25-2010, 01:18 PM
People aren't buying the "green" angle? Sure, it's probably motivated by $$ for the hotel, but reducing waste (including wasted water for washing linens) is a good thing.

I don't like having hotel staff come through my room anyway, so I'm all for it.

Of course its about $$, payroll is expensive and housekeeping is the first logical place to start cost cutting.

I prefer it anyway, I also do not like so many to have access to your personal things.