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VIETgrlTerifa
07-01-2010, 07:59 AM
You know...any toy that you have from 1995 is relatively ancient. How many of us have kept toys for that long?

KatieC
07-01-2010, 01:33 PM
You know...any toy that you have from 1995 is relatively ancient. How many of us have kept toys for that long?

Um, I have toys from the 60's.

paskatefan
07-01-2010, 01:44 PM
Do stuffed animals (mostly Disney characters :D) from the 1970's count?

BelleBway
07-01-2010, 01:47 PM
You know...any toy that you have from 1995 is relatively ancient. How many of us have kept toys for that long?

:shuffle:

I have a couple toys from Toy Story 1, in fact. I, umm, wasn't a kid when I got them.

skatemommy
07-01-2010, 02:17 PM
Um, I have toys from the 60's.

Several that I had are worth thousands on Ebay today...gosh I wish I would have kept them. Luncboxes too!

*Jen*
07-01-2010, 04:00 PM
You know...any toy that you have from 1995 is relatively ancient. How many of us have kept toys for that long?

I think you'll find that the more pertinent question is how many people have kept toys longer?

My mother has toys from the 40s. I have toys from when I was born.

VIETgrlTerifa
07-01-2010, 05:54 PM
I think my point came from the perception that most people don't usually keep the toys that they had as children and have them into adulthood. I know that doesn't apply to everyone, but for me, 15 years is a relatively long time to have a toy.

You guys who have had your toys longer are lucky (or just plain responsible). When I was younger, all of us (brothers and sister) had tons of toys that used to cover both of our rooms. For some reason or another (I can't tell you what happened really) all of my toys just vanished gradually. I think they were either given away or just lost throughout my family's moves.

BTW, it doesn't count if you got the toys as adults because you'll care for them in a way young children may not. ;)

Speaking of, I was reading The Art of Toy Story 3 and John Lasseter mentioned that when they first did a screening for some executives, many of them didn't think it was realistic for Andy to take Woody to college with him. The people of Pixar were like um...it's very probable for animators. I actually think it's highly probable for many adults since I have many friends who have tons of toys still. Two of my friends' (who are also my neighbors) are loaded with collector items...living dead dolls, Star Trek, Star Wars action figures still in the box, Transformers, Marvel/DC superheroes/villains, etc. I once took my then 9 year-old sister to visit my apartment and she got to see their place. The first thing she said to me after we left was that "wow, they're grown-ups but they're still like kids." It totally opened her mind up on how she's allowed to act as an adult.

I think I may save up some money to buy some Toy Story 3 merchandise. I really want Woody, Jessie, and Buzz. I wonder if they see a Totoro stuffed animal. I also saw my friend's Starship Enterprise, and I admit that I wanted it badly.

BelleBway
07-01-2010, 06:17 PM
I think my point came from the perception that most people don't usually keep the toys that they had as children and have them into adulthood. I know that doesn't apply to everyone, but for me, 15 years is a relatively long time to have a toy.

You know, my original point was actually more rooted in the fact that I feel old when things that came out when I was an adult are things that other people consider to be ancient... for whatever reason. :lol: Just wait til you get older and people start talking about things that didn't even exist when you were a kid as "ancient" ;)

(yes slinky dog did probably exist when I was a kid- but obviously not in connection to Toy Story)

Not that I was even offended. Just an observation. :P

Anita18
07-01-2010, 06:27 PM
Speaking of, I was reading The Art of Toy Story 3 and John Lasseter mentioned that when they first did a screening for some executives, many of them didn't think it was realistic for Andy to take Woody to college with him. The people of Pixar were like um...it's very probable for animators. I actually think it's highly probable for many adults since I have many friends who have tons of toys still. Two of my friends' (who are also my neighbors) are loaded with collector items...living dead dolls, Star Trek, Star Wars action figures still in the box, Transformers, Marvel/DC superheroes/villains, etc. I once took my then 9 year-old sister to visit my apartment and she got to see their place. The first thing she said to me after we left was that "wow, they're grown-ups but they're still like kids." It totally opened her mind up on how she's allowed to act as an adult.
:lol: My mom still keeps a pile of our old stuffed animals (as in, some are 20 years old) on a chest in their master bedroom. I only have a couple that I keep with me permanently, but my sister will take a few of them back to her apartment on rotation. :lol: Once when someone was on the news at her workplace, she actually made sure they were on camera in the background. :rofl:

And she wouldn't consider herself a nerd at all. She thinks I'M the nerd going to Comic Con and having friends online whom I've never met. :lol:

*Jen*
07-01-2010, 07:18 PM
I think my point came from the perception that most people don't usually keep the toys that they had as children and have them into adulthood. I know that doesn't apply to everyone, but for me, 15 years is a relatively long time to have a toy.



I kept the most important ones. And when I accidently gave away my care bear, I spent a fortune getting a replacement from ebay :shuffle:

Lots of mine disappeared over the years too.

Garden Kitty
07-01-2010, 07:48 PM
You know...any toy that you have from 1995 is relatively ancient. How many of us have kept toys for that long?

I have my favorite teddy bear that I got for my first birthday. My Raggedy Ann and Andy are still on display at my parents house. Andy's clothes got a little worn with age, so my mom sewed him new pants and a jacket from some blue silky material. The blue material sort of turned purpley over the years, causing Raggedy Andy to be nicknamed Disco Andy. :lol:

dancinsk8
07-01-2010, 11:33 PM
I kept a handful of stuffed animals since childhood, but most of my toys are repurchased from ebay in my early 30's (Fisher Price Play sets, little people, school bus, and chatter telephone) which I was happy to see in the movie. Couldn't believe how thrilled I was to see the FP garage in the butterfly room at the daycare center!

One huge regret, in the early '00s during a move, I left an oversized panda holding a heart just because I knew I wouldn't have space in my new place. I won it at Magic Mountain when I was in 8th grade at a quarter toss, was late to the bus, and the band director punished the late kids by having us clean the bus. It was SO worth it though to see my classmates scream as I approached the bus carrying this HUGE panda....Now, I think, "Yup, he's now in the bitter Lotsa world" :(

Indra486
07-02-2010, 01:45 AM
You know...any toy that you have from 1995 is relatively ancient. How many of us have kept toys for that long?

I still have my Polly Pockets and my two Barbies. :lol:

One part of it has to do with sentiment. The other was due to the fact that when they were sold, they were quite pricey and my mother thought it was worthy keeping. I'm glad I still have them and I have to admit I was too young to "appreciate" my Polly Pockets. (I sadly lost at least three pieces to my home set. :duh: )

DBZ
07-02-2010, 07:48 PM
Saw it today--finally!

I can't fully describe how perfect a coda this movie was to the Toy Story trilogy. Words just don't seem to go far enough. Toy Story 1 & 2 have always been my favorite Pixar films, so seeing this final installment was such a treat for me.

I knew Pixar would deliver a quality film (like it always does), but this movie went above and beyond even my wildest expectations. The first two films always had a bittersweet undertone to them in how they touched upon the fleetingness of childhood and the inevitability of change, but this film fully realized those themes and saw them through to their natural conclusion--but in the best, most poignant way possible.

Needless to say, I was bawling by the end. I actually was laughing through my tears, thinking to myself, "I'm crying over an animated movie about toys!" I don't think I've ever cared so much about a set of characters.

This trilogy, and especially this last film, will be Pixar's lasting legacy IMO. This will be their "Snow White" 70 years down the line. Just a masterpiece.


They deftly handled very adult themes without getting heavy-handed: The sadness of leaving behind things you love when you go to college, the empty-nest syndrome of Andy's mom, the realization that sometimes you have no choice but to let people go, the festering bitterness of being abandoned... Doesn't even sound like a kid's film when you list all those!

What truly surprised me was how they didn't shy away, but instead confronted, the overarching theme of death that has underscored all three films. All the themes they touched on (i.e. growing up, leaving home, letting go, etc.) are all sub-themes/metaphors of death really. They could've easily glossed over it, like they did in "Up," but instead they fully committed to seeing that consequence through. That scene at the dump where the toys (together) face and ultimately reconcile with death was so incredibly powerful, I'm amazed some critics feel this film doesn't measure up to others like "Wall-E" or "Up," which IMO utterly pale in comparison to the humanity and artistry on display in this film.

Anyway, in short...LOVED IT! Thanks to Pixar for creating such wonderful characters and story. I feel lucky to have been along for this great ride.

Also, don't know if this was mentioned yet in the thread, but did anyone else notice that the rocking garbage man was Sid from the first film? Got such a kick out of that.

personwhoishere
07-03-2010, 05:22 AM
Also, don't know if this was mentioned yet in the thread, but did anyone else notice that the rocking garbage man was Sid from the first film? Got such a kick out of that.

Really? I need to go back and see it again; totally did not pick up on that! What clued you in to it?