PDA

View Full Version : The life in English of Miki Ando



Akira Andrea
06-16-2010, 03:22 PM
This is an article in the official home page of TOEIC in Japan of The Institute for International Business Communication (IIBC).
Translation into English.
The life in English of Miki Ando: Vol. 1

Anyway, if you attempt to speak in English, your partner, too, will try to understand your English speech.

Being persuaded by the friend, I began figure skating.

I began figure skating in eight years old. I, too, decided to try simply from force of habit because my friend began skating as one of the lessons and because I had been learning painting etc together with that friend. Therefore it is not because I thought that I would like to do skating specially. 

But I was recommended so as to challenge jump from the coach when I was nine years old. Then I began to tackle the skating aggressively because it was pleasant very much when I challenged jump and because it happened that I had quitted the other lessons, too.

The first overseas experience for me was a skating event in Croatia.

When I was 12 years old, I went to Zagreb in Croatia to participate to the competition.
Because it was not so-called overseas trip but the trip for participating to competition, I had not the time to go to the town and to get in contact with local people. Therefore I was not conscious of the wall of language in particular then.

The language for figure skating is common to all over the world.

It is common to communicate with each other in English, even if the player studied under the coach who came from any country, because most coach can speak English. But I did not experience inconvenience so much as for getting the coaching from when I studied under the foreign coach for the first time because the language for figure skating such as name of jump is common to any country.

Therefore, in my junior high school days and in my high school days, I was not good at in English at all. After a fashion, I went to a school of English conversation but I could not keep my English in active use because I only went to there customarily.

At restaurant, I always used to order same dish.

I was in an environment where, always, someone is on the side of me and interprets for me, too, because I was a minor yet in those days when I moved the training base to US in 2005. So I did not experience so much inconvenience. But it was unbearably unwelcome when it was decided to go to US because I felt uneasy that I had not been able to speak English at all in those days. At the early time when I went to US I had always thought that I would like to go back to Japan.

I always used to order same dish in restaurant because I could not reply to it suitably even if I could understand the rough outline of the speaking of salesperson when I went to go shopping or went to restaurant.

Because I was told that everybody can understand sufficiently English which Miki speaks...

I did not go out too much because I did not have a friend yet in the early time when I came to US, but I tried to speak in English little by little because the coach advised me, saying, "You had better so as to be able to speak English as the player who is active in the world, and you can extend your horizons if you get to be able to speak English".

I got to think to attempt to speak in English because after that the coach said, "You had better answer in English by yourself without interpreter at the interview of English because Miki can speak English more than you are thinking in yourself. Try it because everybody can understand sufficiently English which Miki speaks".

The pronunciation like a dog's bark!?

In those days, I became friendly with a player of a Chinese American girl who was training in the same rink, and that girl helped me in something and corrected any mistakes in my English. Since then, learning a word etc also by myself, my English power had risen little by little. It may also have been well that I was in the environment where no Japanese are there.

I had not thought that I must pronounce distinguishing between R and L till being pointed out by her.
In a Starbucks, there was a pound cake called "Marble Loaf", but I ordered it saying "Marber Roaf" with the pronunciation of R instead of all L in that word, while thinking that I must pronounce so as to be understood well by doing my best.
Then I was laughed at very much by her who had heard that pronunciation, while saying, "Your pronunciation is like a dog's bark!"
The dog's bark is "bowwow" in English, but she said that my pronunciation resembles it and used to have laughed while imitating my pronunciation for about one week from then. But, at the same time, she said also, "Everybody understands Miki's English sufficiently, but if you get to be able to distinguish between R and L, it will become better.” And she said, “I think it is difficult to do so, but I hope you will do your best!" This affair was a good opportunity for me to have begun to try to pronounce distinguishing between R and L.

Let's imagine, "If a foreigner is going to speak in Japanese."

If a foreigner is going to speak in Japanese, we are glad and will try to understand it as well as we can, won’t we?
Likewise, if a Japanese is trying to talk in English as well as he can, the partner, too, will try to hear it and will try to understand even if there has been a grammatical mistake.  I became able to think so from some time.
Since then, I got to attempt to speak anyway even the English phrase which I could not speak because I thought, "This way of speaking may be a mistake."  Because I found that it was understood unexpectedly when I attempted to speak in English, I got to be able to speak well moreover.
Therefore, I think that it may be useful for the progress of the ability in English that we try thinking from opposite place. 

The article:
The life in English of Miki Ando: Vol. 1
http://www.toeic.or.jp/square/entertainment/e_life/20_1.html

MikiAndoFan#1
06-16-2010, 03:35 PM
Thank you so much for your translation, Akira Andrea!

:)

I think Miki's English is great and it has improved so much! Since she is moving to Russia, I wonder if she knows how to say some things in Russian! I believe I read somewhere that she was studying Russian, but I'm not sure. She looks fantastic in those photos!

:cheer2:

JamieSix
06-16-2010, 06:15 PM
This is fascinating! Thanks, Akira!

Pegasus
06-16-2010, 07:31 PM
Thank you so much for your translation, Akira Andrea!

:)

I think Miki's English is great and it has improved so much! Since she is moving to Russia, I wonder if she knows how to say some things in Russian! I believe I read somewhere that she was studying Russian, but I'm not sure. She looks fantastic in those photos!

:cheer2:

I read somewhere that she knows some basic Russian and sometimes speaks Russian as well.

So, with English, Japanese and Russian, that's a great foundation of languages that she can use forever.

:)

RunnersHigh
06-17-2010, 11:53 AM
Good girl! (I mean young Miki in U.S.)
But I hate TOEIC & TOEFL both. :(

Thanks, Akira Andrea as usual!

IRIS1975
06-17-2010, 12:26 PM
I saw some clips on YouTube where Morozov says to Miki in Russian during training "Krasavitsa (Beauty)" and "Molodets (Attagirl)" I think she understands these praises well!

Akira Andrea
06-23-2010, 02:08 AM
This is an article in the official home page of TOEIC in Japan of The Institute for International Business Communication (IIBC).
Translation into English.
The life in English of Miki Ando: Vol. 2

It becomes part of my nature because being the expression which I learned it while using actually.

When we recalled an English class in junior high school days, we often find that the sentence which we learned for the first time is the expression which we never use in usual conversation such as "This is a pen", doesn't we?

Also as for greeting, there are various answers such as "I'm OK", "So so" and "Tired" according to the situation when we answer to "How are you?", but the expression that I learned in the school was only one of "I'm fine thank you, and you?" Against that, I got to feel a doubt when I got to use English usually. Namely, I think that I had better have been able to study the expression which it is using really moreover.

I used to buy several texts to study English, too, but it was not useful at all.
I think that it becomes the part of our nature to have learned by speaking actually by self and asking to other person.

English is easier to express naturally what I thought, now. There is a honorific also in English, but we can talk without being conscious of it as in Japanese, and I got to think that English is simpler than Japanese for making a sentence. Recently, even in an interview in Japanese, there is even a moment which I find "I spoke it in Japanese after thinking in English."

I got to dream even a dream in English.

When being near New York, I had a lot of opportunity to go to see a show to Broadway, on the weekend, too. I had looked forward to that very much and had learned a great deal from that, too. It is not that I went there to study English, but I think that it was useful for learning English expression.

In movie, too, I got to be able to understand almost in English, so I sometimes notice why those words won’t translate in Japanese when I saw the subtitles in Japanese conversely. Recently I sometimes dream even a dream in English.

The expression to say "I love you" is used also between friends.

Also in my Japanese friend, there is a person who is good at speaking in English rather than speaking in Japanese, so recently I have more opportunities to use English rather than to use Japanese for chatting by mail or talking by skype.

The expression to say "I love you" in English is used well also between friends. I can not imagine the situation which I am using it without an unnatural feeling, because the expression to say "ai-shiteimasu or I love you" in Japanese has a somewhat heavy meaning, but in English I can say "I love you" naturally. I think that it is nice and cute expression, because we can express one's own feeling obediently to the friend by it.

I think that it is English-like and cute to write like a "4 u" instead of "for you" in mail, too. As for emoticon, too, I had an impression being strange at first because they are written lying on their side in English, but recently I use them well. In the mail to a bosom friend, I use "xoxo" well, too.

The impression to the oversea audience.

I have an impression that oversea audience is more enjoying the figure skating itself than Japanese audience. I feel that it is understood well there that the figure skating is an art and a competitive sports to show it to the person, because it have long history in Europe and US. It is of course that the audience gives us a standing ovation when we performed a good performance and that, in the last skating group, the higher the level of the player becomes, the bigger the clapping and cheer become, but generous clapping is given to any player basically.

In Vancouver Olympics, I could communicate with a player who belong to the other competitive sports, too.

In Vancouver Olympics, I had an opportunity to talk with a hockey player who is being active in NHL. For that player it was his fifth Olympics and his arm was in a cast because he had been suffering injury when I met him. But, he seems to have participated to the match of NHL till the before day when he came to Vancouver Olympics and he said that he returns also to NHL as soon as the match of Olympics has finished. So, I thought that the player is far from easy also in the other sports.

Because I only know the world of the figure skating, I feel terribly freshly when hearing the topic of other sports. In that case, I thought that it was good to have been able to speak English.

The moment which I felt that it was good to have been skating.

In Vancouver Olympics, I felt uneasy, too, because I had failed at the last Olympics, but I could face there while thinking, "I would like to attempt my own skating" because the supporting of people who have supported me so far and of people who have cheered me in Japan became my power. Then, when I finished skating in the free skating, I felt for the first time in my life that it was good to have been skating.

At the moment when it finished, the feelings of thanks to the people who supported me sprung up while feeling relieved because it passed off without accident. I was really glad that I could skate with all my feelings of thanks because the skating is the only thing that I can do in return to the people who are cheering me.

I would like to coach a pupil at figure skating in US.

Sometime I would like to coach a pupil at figure skating in US. I had not intended to become the player of figure skating when I began to skate, but I had gotten to learn skating professionally because that coach was my favorite when I met the coach called Yuko Monna. Therefore, I have a wish that I would like to become the coach like Yuko Monna.

I have a wish, too, that I would like to coach a pupil at figure skating in Japan, but the wish which I would like to do so in US is much stronger than that in Japan, because the environment for figure skating in US is favorite with me.

The article:
The life in English of Miki Ando: Vol. 2
http://www.toeic.or.jp/square/entertainment/e_life/index.html

Eris
06-23-2010, 08:53 PM
I read somewhere that she knows some basic Russian and sometimes speaks Russian as well
Her coach usually talks to her in Russian in K&C and she seems to understand.:cool:

Akira Andrea, thank you for translation :)

WayCon
06-24-2010, 04:59 AM
Yes, thank you, Akira Andrea, for all your work.

And I found her closing comment that "figure skating in US is favorite with me" is quite flattering. I'm glad she wants to stay here.

WayCon
06-25-2010, 04:45 AM
Also, when Miki and Nikolai sit together outside the snack-bar, they speak English.

SkateUniverse
07-01-2010, 02:26 AM
I saw her at the European and she was giving an interview in English. Go Miki Go!!!!