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LynnW
05-23-2010, 05:35 AM
I can vouch for the brewery. I went to college in Golden (where the brewery is located) and you can get a full tour, and end up in the bar area at the end. Orrrrr you can ask for the "short tour" where you'll go straight to the bar area for free beer. ;)

Railroad museum is pretty cool too.

:lol: @ the "short tour". I would think that would be pretty popular, especially for the college crowd. :40beers:

Garden Kitty
05-23-2010, 05:53 AM
Not sure where you are coming from, and if you're used to being in the mountains a lot, but if you do go to the Rockies be alert for altitude sensitivity. I've only travelled out there a few times, but on the trips, some people aren't bothered by it at all, but some are affected and have to be sure to take it easy and drink lots of water.

lenac03
05-23-2010, 10:45 PM
:lol: @ the "short tour". I would think that would be pretty popular, especially for the college crowd. :40beers:

It was. Erm. Is.

Not that I experienced it once or twice a week or anything.

Gazpacho
05-23-2010, 11:09 PM
A general rule is to wear layers. You might be in a tank top in Denver, but an hour and a half away, you need a jacket, and then if you go near the top of a mountain, you're shivering. Not sure if it applies in the summertime like it does in the springtime, but I would err on that side.


Not sure where you are coming from, and if you're used to being in the mountains a lot, but if you do go to the Rockies be alert for altitude sensitivity. I've only travelled out there a few times, but on the trips, some people aren't bothered by it at all, but some are affected and have to be sure to take it easy and drink lots of water.You may want to ask your doctor for a few days worth of Diamox, as that helps so much in preventing altitude effects.

Altitude effects are quite odd. I have very poor cardiovascular fitness yet have done comparatively well at high altitude (~12,000 feet), while some people are very physically fit yet can't adapt to the altitude as easily. And some years you go and are fine, and others you're not.

So it doesn't hurt to have some Diamox just in case.


You mentioned that your husband is interested in the national park. Rocky Mountain National Park (approx 1.5 hour drive NW of Denver) is a must see.I can't say enough positive things about RMNP.

One more tip: Some of the roads such as Hastings Pass can be scary to drive. On those roads there will often be people in huge trucks tailgating you and making you feel nervous. There are designated pull-to-the-side spots to let those guys pass. Use those rather than succumb to the pressure that those drivers exert on you.

lenac03
05-24-2010, 12:08 AM
In short, probably a good idea not to run a 5k immediately upon landing. Stay hydrated.

numbers123
05-24-2010, 01:19 AM
I love the rockie mountains, but if anyone in your family has asthma or lungs that are compromised, just be cautious of the higher elevations. Both my husband and my sons had lung conditions and had some unusual reactions. Husband fainted on me during one visit (stayed hydrated the next visit), son had asthma episode during one trip - fortunately I had prednisone, ventolin aerosal treatments with us. Both were pretty scary, because they were unexpected reactions. If I had been prepared, it might not have been as scary.

judiz
05-24-2010, 02:02 AM
I'm asthmatic so my allergist is giving me an inhaler to use before and while we are in Colorado, I don't plan on doing any climbing.

Flatfoote
05-24-2010, 02:13 AM
I'm asthmatic too. I've also lived here all my life (well, since I was 3 anyway, which is pretty much all my life). So one would think I'd be acclimated to the altitude. We've made several trips to Central City/Blackhawk before and after their tranformations into gambling towns. And although I never had trouble before, my last trip was terrible. There are a lot of steep sidewalks. And on that last trip, it felt like someone had poured concrete down into my lungs and let it harden. Of course, it didn't help to be accompanied by a sister who had to "show me" how much more fit she was than me, and how incensed she was I dared to be not fit enough to keep up with her and breathe at the same time.

Lizziebeth
05-24-2010, 01:13 PM
In short, probably a good idea not to run a 5k immediately upon landing. Stay hydrated.

A flatlander friend of mine travelled to Colorado with his wife and son. She is a runner and decided to run the evening they arrived. She and her son went their usual distance and finished OK. She was so sick the next day she had to stay in bed. Her son did not feel the effects as much. Maybe age can be a factor too??

barbk
05-24-2010, 04:52 PM
Some hotel suggestions:
In Denver: Holiday Inn Select - Cherry Creek. On Colorado Boulevard, lots of businesses and restaurants around. About ten blocks from Cherry Creek Shopping Center and the surrounding Cherry Creek retail district. (Personally not a big fan of the shopping center, but the district is very lovely with lots of shops, restaurants, galleries.) About 30 blocks (just North on Colorado Blvd.) from the Zoo, the Museum of Nature and Science, and about 20 blocks from the Botanical Gardens. Even nicer (and better located) is the JW Marriott Cherry Creek - right in the midst of everything, but unless you can find a deal on it, well outside your range.

Downtown Denver is about 25 blocks away -- great bus service. I don't see much in the way of nicer downtown hotels in the price range you want, and those that do have better prices are either fewer stars or in dodgier locations.

Colorado Springs - Hyatt Place Garden of the Gods, Doubletree Hotel Colorado Springs World Arena, Crowne Plaza (couple dollars over, but maybe a splurge for a night)

Boulder - Quality Inn & Suites Boulder Creek. No restaurant on-site, but this is in a good location -- about four blocks to Pearl Street, the nice outdoor shopping/restaurant district. Days Hotel - Boulder: This is a little out-of-the-way (car definitely needed) but has the benefit of having on on site cafe open for breakfast and lunch that is good enough that we go there every month or so. Millenium Harvest House is the biggest hotel in town, you might get a better rate if you call them directly or have AAA. Several restaurants. The classic is the Hotel Boulderado, but it is going to be out of range in all probability. Marriott - need to look for a good price, but nice location. Has restaurants, and an Original Pancake House and Egg & I restaurants are both across the parking lot. (This is a regular Mariott, not a Courtyard). At a substantially lower pricepoint, Louisville, the next town over from Boulder (towards Denver, about 15 min. from Boulder) has a bunch of hotels.

Estes Park - Best Western Silver Saddle (A motel, but reasonably nice, in a very good location.) The Holiday Inn is nicer, but unless you can find a deal, probably outside your price range. There are some wonderful cottage complexes, often along one of the rivers -- let me know if that might be of interest -- typically no restaurant, though, and they may have a several night minimum.