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FiveRinger
06-22-2010, 07:30 PM
OMG--you guys, I am so sorry. I swear this is the last time I am going to speak on this. I used to work for this company. It was only for about 6 months about 4 years ago, but I left to finish school. The job I had couldn't accomodate my class schedule. You know how that is--they tell you one thing and it turns out another. Anyway, I left on good terms and I am trying to get rehired. It has been impossible to get a response with the current job market. That's why I was so excited about this possible opportunity.

Aceon6
06-23-2010, 12:26 AM
FiveRinger, have you called your old boss? His/her assistant? The guy/gal who was viewed as the top performer in the department? The script starts like this "Hi. It's been a while, but I'm in the job market and would love to get back to working at ABC. I've seen a posting for job Z, but I'm having trouble finding the right contacts. Do you have any thoughts on who I can contact?"

Don't ask for a reference or help getting the job at this point, just for advice on the right person to contact. If you get to the next step in the process, have coffee with the person who helped you and get advice about doing a good job on the interview. As long as you're not asking them for direct help in jumping the line for the job, most people will help with interviewing tips, current issues at the company, company culture, etc. IME, the less help you ask for, the more you'll get.

iloveemoticons
06-23-2010, 01:00 AM
How often should one keep in touch with past supervisors? I've been working at the same job for a fairly long time, and I made the mistake of not keeping in touch my former supervisors for various reasons, ie. they're in other states or I had an internship and didn't work with them for very long. Now I'm interested in applying for a position but the application requires a list of past supervisors and their contact numbers and I'm :wall: now. Is there any way to deal with this? Thanks!

Veronika
03-16-2011, 02:12 AM
Pulling this up again. I've been trying to get a job in my new town for over 5 months now, and I'm finally getting some responses. However, the company that I really want to work for is not contacting me. I've applied for many jobs with them, and I haven't gotten so much as an interview. I do have a few contacts in the company, but that hasn't helped either. I'm very much qualified for the jobs I'm applying for, and the company is in the same industry that I currently work in.

So now that I'm getting interview opportunities with other companies, how do I let the place I really want to work at know this? I want them to think I'm a hot commodity and they may miss their chance with me. But I don't want them to think that I'm saying I'm too good for them. Help???

FigureSpins
03-16-2011, 02:32 AM
Someone has suggested that I try to do some informational interviews, especially since I am trying to change careers. I would be interested in getting your opinions about that (how successful can they really be, how to get in touch with someone to get them set up, etc.).

They can be successful as long as you can hold back on asking about open positions. Keep it focused on the company, the skill set they are looking for, trade journals and organziations, types of positions, but not open positions.

This was a required class project for my MBA. We had to do informational interviews with our current employer, an alumni, and an exec at a company that we would like to work for.

A friend of mine had a close friend who was an exec at a company that I really liked a lot from the outside looking in, a competitor of my first corporate employer. She arranged an informational interview for me. I loved the place and I received a lot of networking information and possibilities. He even asked to see my resume and gave me some feedback.

A week later, his secretary called and set up three interviews. All went well and they were going to create a job for me in that department, outside of IT. That's when the first layoffs in 20 years hit, lol. Obviously, no job was created.

However, I did get invaluable feedback that led me to my highest-paying and most visible job ever. Silver linings, right?

One bit of advice: tell all your friends and family that you're job hunting. Give them some ideas of companies or agencies you'd like to work with. You never know who knows someone. In the example above, my friend was a nun who had taught the exec many years before, but they had kept in touch as adults through their parish.

As for the "Ad from No One Who Works Here," I also think it's an automatic-renewal thing to bring in possible new resumes. I remember looking for a job once and getting the most bizarre phone interviews. Recruiters do other strange things: one advertised regularly for certain skills and when I responded, they'd set up a phone interview where they tech-quizzed me in broken english about other skills that weren't in the posting. A corporate friend said that the agency specialized in outsourcing, so they were probably looking to say "Hey, we posted this in the US and got no one who was qualified, but there's this guy in () that can do the job." Sometimes, they're a loss leader or bait-and-switch gamer.

Aceon6
03-16-2011, 01:01 PM
So now that I'm getting interview opportunities with other companies, how do I let the place I really want to work at know this? I want them to think I'm a hot commodity and they may miss their chance with me. But I don't want them to think that I'm saying I'm too good for them. Help???

Try working your network at the preferred company again, but be prepared for more dead ends. Sometimes, the desirable company is the hardest to get into because so few people leave voluntarily. Temp or contract work may be the only way in.

Some of the most successful companies are very careful about their cash flows, and only create new positions when they are developing new products or when they enter new markets. Most of the successful job hunters I know keep a close eye on business news so they're ready to jump when the market conditions are right.

Veronika
03-16-2011, 03:04 PM
Try working your network at the preferred company again, but be prepared for more dead ends. Sometimes, the desirable company is the hardest to get into because so few people leave voluntarily. Temp or contract work may be the only way in.

They've been posting job openings pretty regularly...which I find frustrating. Maybe they aren't really serious about hiring people right now?

I appreciate any advice I can get here. All told, I've been looking for a new job for almost 2 years, and I haven't gotten very far.

GarrAarghHrumph
03-16-2011, 03:21 PM
They've been posting job openings pretty regularly...which I find frustrating. Maybe they aren't really serious about hiring people right now?

If this company is in your industry, and is local, and you have continually applied and never heard back, then any of the following could be going on:

- They do not hire directly out of their competitor, as a matter of informal or formal policy

- They do not like what they are seeing in your resume

- They know someone in your company who knows you, and are not getting favorable word

I know those last two things are kind of harsh, but if you've applied and applied there, and never even gotten a nibble, and you truly are qualified, and those jobs are truly open... then something is potentially wrong with how you're presenting yourself/being presented to them. That, or they do not hire out of that local competitor.

If you know that they hire out of your company, then there is perhaps something up with your resume re: what they're looking for - and that, you could perhaps fix. But if it's the third thing, then that's harsh.

You said you know some people in that company. Do they know who has been hired to fill the positions you've applied for, and what their background is? If so, maybe that info would help you. Perhaps you are qualified, but the people hired are even moreso. Perhaps the company is looking for something specific that you don't have, and which you can get and add to your qualifications.

Aceon6
03-16-2011, 03:23 PM
They've been posting job openings pretty regularly...which I find frustrating. Maybe they aren't really serious about hiring people right now?

I can only speak for my current situation, but 90% of our new hires are contract to perm. It gives us a chance to see how the person will work out before extending an offer. The only jobs we post as direct hires are those for scarce skills or a very specific experience level. If you look at our listings on Monster and Dice, it does appear we have openings, but those openings are in niche areas and are the hardest to fill.

Veronika
03-16-2011, 03:50 PM
If this company is in your industry, and is local, and you have continually applied and never heard back, then any of the following could be going on:

- They do not hire directly out of their competitor, as a matter of informal or formal policy

- They do not like what they are seeing in your resume

- They know someone in your company who knows you, and are not getting favorable word

I know those last two things are kind of harsh, but if you've applied and applied there, and never even gotten a nibble, and you truly are qualified, and those jobs are truly open... then something is potentially wrong with how you're presenting yourself/being presented to them. That, or they do not hire out of that local competitor.


I'm trying to move from one city to another--they are 1.5 hours from each other, but in different states. I do not think that the two companies are competitors, they are in different lines of business.

I think option number 2 is the best guess. I need to customize my resume to what they are looking for, and emphasize their goals. I don't think they know anyone in my current company.


You said you know some people in that company. Do they know who has been hired to fill the positions you've applied for, and what their background is? If so, maybe that info would help you. Perhaps you are qualified, but the people hired are even moreso. Perhaps the company is looking for something specific that you don't have, and which you can get and add to your qualifications.

I do "know" some people, but they are rather indirect acquaintances, so I don't think I'd feel comfortable asking about their current new hires. I thought that having connections would help, but these aren't good connections, I guess.

Aceon6
03-16-2011, 04:03 PM
I do "know" some people, but they are rather indirect acquaintances, so I don't think I'd feel comfortable asking about their current new hires. I thought that having connections would help, but these aren't good connections, I guess.

This is where LinkedIn might be helpful. If you can link to these people, you will be able to find out all the paths that connect you to the employer. For example, I'm linked to a person due to a personal friendship, but she is linked to the hiring manager for a major firm due to a work relationship. I was able to give the info I got on LinkedIn to another friend who was looking for work.

Veronika
03-16-2011, 05:06 PM
I am on LinkedIn--I'll start working with it more. Thanks!

GarrAarghHrumph
03-16-2011, 05:18 PM
I'm trying to move from one city to another--they are 1.5 hours from each other, but in different states.

This could be a real issue. They could be concerned about relocation. Do you need them to pay for relo and interview costs? If not, then that may allow them to hire you. If the following is true, then when you apply, make sure that your cover letter states, right up front, that you are planning to move to this city, and that you will fund your own relocation, as well as any costs involved re: interview travel. That you are free to move as soon as they need you.


I think option number 2 is the best guess. I need to customize my resume to what they are looking for, and emphasize their goals. I don't think they know anyone in my current company.

This is vital. Your resume and cover letter should be 100% applicable to each job you apply to, and that often means you must customize it. This includes incorporating key words that they use in their job posting, etc.

Veronika
03-16-2011, 05:35 PM
This could be a real issue. They could be concerned about relocation. Do you need them to pay for relo and interview costs? If not, then that may allow them to hire you. If the following is true, then when you apply, make sure that your cover letter states, right up front, that you are planning to move to this city, and that you will fund your own relocation, as well as any costs involved re: interview travel. That you are free to move as soon as they need you.

This is vital. Your resume and cover letter should be 100% applicable to each job you apply to, and that often means you must customize it. This includes incorporating key words that they use in their job posting, etc.

I've already moved...and I mention that in my cover letter as well. I wonder if it might be tied to salary--I'm moving from a larger city with a much higher cost of living to a smaller city with a much lower COL. I keep saying that my salary is negotiable, and I don't know how much more I can say about that.

I'm going to work on my resume ASAP! Thanks!