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rjblue
05-18-2010, 03:13 AM
Assuming a person is not doing anything incriminating or professionally embarassing, wouldn't having a clearly authentic presence on the internet be protection against someone impersonating you?

I have a paid email service I use for anything related to secure transactions, and a free internet email that I use for Facebook, forums, etc.

I just don't see where the personal risk comes into it. People who know me already are aware of where I live, and who my family is, and what my interests are. Since they are the ones who are exponentially more likely to harm me than random strangers, facebooking doesn't really make life more dangerous.

The copyright of content thing I would think is necessary, since this is Facebook's website they need to be able to have immediate control of inappropriate content. They aren't really interested in pictures of my grandchild, or my son's soccer game, except that it makes my friends stay on their website for a few clicks.

Norlite
05-18-2010, 03:39 AM
I actually love posting my pictures on facebook. :shuffle:

And I even like looking through my friend's pictures, particularly their vacation pictures.

I have a small list of friends, just family, friends and close work people, and I really like looking through their pictures without having to listen to the vocal play by play of the entire vacation from every single day.

I kept a running picture diary of us when we went to Van. for Olympics and I know those in my friends list enjoyed them. Tagged my daughter in them and got nice comments from her friends too.

Love facebook! And I do so much online from different forums, groups and not to mention mega shopping, facebook is just one little bit more. Not a big deal to me.

Really
05-18-2010, 04:20 AM
I agree, Norlite! I really enjoy FB too. I have things tied down rather tightly, and keep various lists of friends, but it's my connection to people I might not otherwise keep in touch with. I've found a half-brother I'd never met, and several old friends organized a small reunion after reconnecting on FB. One just has to be smart about what gets put there, and who is allowed to see it.

However, like Ziggy, I'm waiting to see what comes of the Diaspora (http://joindiaspora.com/) project.

Evilynn
05-18-2010, 10:19 AM
Assuming a person is not doing anything incriminating or professionally embarassing, wouldn't having a clearly authentic presence on the internet be protection against someone impersonating you?


That's actually the reason I registered myself on Facebook in the first place. I'd rather they find me than mistake me for someone else who's stuff I have no control over.

Prancer
05-18-2010, 10:34 AM
That's actually the reason I registered myself on Facebook in the first place. I'd rather they find me than mistake me for someone else who's stuff I have no control over.

That's how I got on Facebook to begin with. Way back when it was only open to people with college email addresses, all of the faculty where I work were advised to put up their own Facebook pages just to keep students from putting up fakes. I put one up and never used it. Students used to go poking around on it looking for information, so I made sure there was nothing to find.

Now that Facebook is open to anyone, the "mock my prof" problem is actually less of an issue than it used to be, so things are a little different. There are, however, some people who I would just as soon would not be able to find me all that easily--some of whom post here, or have in the past :D. But otherwise, I'm with rjblue; it's people who already know you that you have to worry about. Some random stalker isn't likely to pick you out on Facebook and come after you.

That said, some articles about Facebook and privacy:

"Mark really does believe very much in transparency and the vision of an open society and open world, and so he wants to push people that way." (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/37134077/ns/technology_and_science-tech_and_gadgets/ns/technology_and_science-tech_and_gadgets/)

Check out Openbook (http://www.thetechherald.com/article.php/201020/5617/Openbook-highlights-public-information-on-Facebook)

Test Your Facebook Privacy Settings (http://www.pcworld.com/article/196464/test_your_facebook_privacy_settings_heres_how.html )

Really
05-18-2010, 12:11 PM
Test Your Facebook Privacy Settings (http://www.pcworld.com/article/196464/test_your_facebook_privacy_settings_heres_how.html )This one was posted on Mashable yesterday. I checked it out and it says I have everything locked down that should be. It's very easy to use.

Prancer
05-18-2010, 12:43 PM
Openbook is certainly interesting. :shuffle:

Really
05-18-2010, 01:07 PM
Openbook is certainly interesting. :shuffle:Just reading about that one on a blog right now. I used the ReclaimPrivacy tool.

ETA: Just checked it -- nope, I didn't show up!

numbers123
05-18-2010, 02:05 PM
Openbook is certainly interesting. :shuffle:

I didn't show up either - and I updated a status a minute before searching which should have shown up. also seached for a status that one of my friends had and they showed up.

And I am very tired right now and can't focus on all the privacy settings listed in test your privacy settings. Will check later in the day.

A statement in one of the articles concerned me - and that was the "temporary" glich of someone being able to see a live chat with another person. That is someone who had not been involved in your chat could see what you were chatting with another person. I wondered about that around the time it was reported to be a problem based upon a live chat experience I had. Plus I am beginning to wonder if it doesn't show up with other upgrades to the privacy changes. One experience was about 18 months ago and another one was about 6 months ago.

Angelskates
05-18-2010, 02:28 PM
I can't get the testing site to show?

ETA: I got it to work, thanks!


good you are opted-out of the Instant Personalization feature
good all of your personal information is at restricted to your friends or closer
good all of your contact information is at restricted to your friends or closer
good all of your friends, tags, and connections information is at restricted to your friends or closer
good your friends are protected from accidentally sharing your personal information
good you have blocked all known applications that could leak your personal information

I am assuming that there's only "good" and "bad"?

*Jen*
05-18-2010, 03:22 PM
That spooky spokeo site determines where a person lives based on where your ISP address is. Totally random guess. My family and I worked this out when we all showed up in the same European city when I searched, and same Australian suburb when they searched. Neither were correct :shuffle:

My flatmate found some :eek: stuff about herself and her family on there, so she's going to register a fake email and have them take it off.

Ziggy
05-18-2010, 03:23 PM
Another awesome tool to check and fix your FB privacy settings. :)
http://www.reclaimprivacy.org/facebook

El Rey
05-18-2010, 04:24 PM
ut on Facebook and come after you.

That said, some articles about Facebook and privacy:

Test Your Facebook Privacy Settings (http://www.pcworld.com/article/196464/test_your_facebook_privacy_settings_heres_how.html )

Thanks for sharing this! I thought I was totally private but found I was sharing some stuff. I was wondering how one of my friends was able to know what I had written on a Yelp review, although this person wouldn't have known I was on Yelp, because the "junk" email address I use for this type of stuff is only visible to me on Facebook, so he wouldn't have been able to search for me that way since no one knows that email. It's because facebook was sharing my information with Yelp!

That's what's making me mad about all these privacy updates. They keep making stuff about you public without your permission!

kwanfan1818
05-18-2010, 04:40 PM
From the Openbook article:


The fact that privacy controls led to a potential security problem, as well as the recent privacy changes when mixed with the “Like” feature, there have been reports on what appears to be a major backlash against Facebook. Yet, despite more than 3,000 pledges from people to delete their profiles over privacy concerns, the backlash appears to be held to a vocal minority.

For the last several days, FB has been trying to get me to attach profile information to specific pages. (I guess most of my favorite books don't have pages, nor does my interest in gastroporn :lol:.)

I finally chose "select individual pages" (or whatever they call it), unchecked every recommendation, and updated. I then got a message to say that my profile would be blank if I confirmed, which I did.

My profile has, indeed, been wiped away from the page view. I didn't even have to bother to do it myself. However, they still have the data, and I'm sure they'll sell and share it until the cows come home.

Andora
05-18-2010, 05:02 PM
Thanks for the privacy scan, Prancer. I had thought I was still all closed off, but alas, parts of my profile were open to everyone.

I'd get mad that Facebook continues to mess with my profile, but it is their site, and I suppose they get to make the rules. I'm not too concerned about what I have up there, as it's not much, but it's still frustrating.