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Rex
05-14-2010, 12:51 PM
The command wants me to become a notary; they are willing to pay for the seminar and certification; they want a civilian who will always be here to be able to notarize documents with contractors. It's good for four years in PA and I can use it outside of the office if I so choose.

Is anyone here a notary and can you tell me what the good and bad points of it are?

Aceon6
05-14-2010, 01:06 PM
My husband is one. The only downside is that your relatives will remember and may ask you to notarize documents when you'd rather be doing something else. The other annoyance is that you have to find another notary for your own documents.

MOIJTO
05-14-2010, 01:13 PM
It never hurts to have other sources of income potential!

Prancer
05-14-2010, 01:18 PM
Is anyone here a notary and can you tell me what the good and bad points of it are?

I'm a notary. I don't know that there are any particular good or bad points to discuss. :P It's convenient to have a notary around, so your command will appreciate it. You aren't responsible for legal content; all you have to do is verify identity, sometimes have someone swear an oath, watch people sign their papers and then sign and stamp behind them to verify that you checked their identity, adminstered the oath and witnessed the signature.

It's pretty painless. But don't tell your personal friends and family members about it, because as sure as you do, they will want you to notarize their shadier transactions. I don't mind notarizing car titles and things for people, but when they come to me with forged papers--even though they have really good stories for why they have to sign this car title even though they don't actually own the car--it can get a bit tense.

If you're willing to risk that, you can hang out a shingle and charge people for notarizations, but if PA is anything like Ohio, you won't make any money at all.

Rex
05-14-2010, 01:28 PM
Thanks, kids. I'm gonna do it as soon as they approve my waiver.


If you're willing to risk that, you can hang out a shingle and charge people for notarizations, but if PA is anything like Ohio, you won't make any money at all. Why is that? I was thinking about a little extra coin.

Prancer
05-14-2010, 01:45 PM
Why is that? I was thinking about a little extra coin.

You might want to check your state fee schedule first.

This is Ohio's:

A notary public is entitled to the following fees:

(A) For the protest of a bill of exchange or promissory note, one dollar and actual necessary expenses in going beyond the corporate limits of a municipal corporation to make presentment or demand; (that means you can charge mileage, basically, on the very off chance that you are asked to travel)

(B) For recording an instrument required to be recorded by a notary public, ten cents for each one hundred words;

(C) For taking and certifying acknowledgments of deeds, mortgages, liens, powers of attorney, and other instruments of writing, and for taking and certifying depositions, administering oaths, and other official services, the same fees as are allowed by section 2319.27 of the Revised Code or by law to clerks of the courts of common pleas for like services; (the statute allows for one or two dollars, depending)

(D) For taking and certifying an affidavit, one dollar and fifty cents.

Now before a million people run in to tell me that they have been charged more than that and blah blah blah--yes, there are people who charge more. Yes, some people are entitled to do so and in some states, notaries are allowed to charge for various expenses. Fees vary from state to state. But most notaries who charge more than $5 for anything are overcharging. I've even had some tell me that they didn't know there were set fees. Uh, yes. And that's usually covered on the exam, along with the jail sentence you can get for overcharging people.

I never charge anybody. I just can't bring myself to stamp something and say "That'll be one dollar."

ETA: I think I found PA's. You can charge more, but still--you'll have to do a lot of notarizing to make more than the occasional Big Mac with fries: http://www.notariesequipment.com/052805.htm

Rex
05-14-2010, 01:48 PM
OMG - it hardly sounds worth it. Think I'll use it for just job purposes.

Prancer
05-14-2010, 01:52 PM
OMG - it hardly sounds worth it. Think I'll use it for just job purposes.

Since so many places have free notarizations--banks, law offices, real estate offices, etc,--there really isn't a whole lot of demand for entrepreneurial notaries, so no, don't expect to rake it in.

olympic
05-14-2010, 02:21 PM
OMG - it hardly sounds worth it. Think I'll use it for just job purposes.

Oh yes. I'm a Notary in Fla. A negligible amount of earnings comes from being a Notary. I did it because it gives my resume as a paralegal @ a law firm a boost.

Garden Kitty
05-14-2010, 02:44 PM
It can be a useful thing to have at work, and it really isn't much trouble. These days, and extra skill that may help differentiate you from someone else is never a bad thing.

purple skates
05-14-2010, 02:51 PM
I'm a notary in Michigan, have been for over 15 years. I just use it at work, though, nowhere else.

made_in_canada
05-14-2010, 04:22 PM
Wow, why is it so cheap? I paid $40 just to get my ID verified for a criminal records check :yikes:

Norlite
05-14-2010, 04:33 PM
Wow, why is it so cheap? I paid $40 just to get my ID verified for a criminal records check :yikes:


Yeah, there's always a charge in Canada unless perhaps you get your lawyer or her clerk to do it.

$40. sounds like a lot to me but I know my kids have been charged anywhere from $15 to $25.


Actually, now that I think about it, I may be thinking of a commissioner for taking affidavits. I always get the two mixed up.

Rex
05-14-2010, 04:33 PM
How does the notary public system work in Canada?

PDilemma
05-14-2010, 05:21 PM
There is an article in the paper today that indicates that you are not to notarize things for relatives, not in Nebraska anyway. Some loan documents for a business are being declared invalid because the guy's brother-in-law notarized them.