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Ziggy
05-27-2010, 06:43 PM
[delete because what I said has been suggested already]

skatesindreams
05-27-2010, 06:46 PM
Please, keep us updated.
All of these suggestions are good ones, and can lead to a positive outcome, and a more satisfying position than the one you had.

Stay strong and don't give up.
The best opportunities often arrive you least expect them.

Debbie S
05-27-2010, 06:48 PM
This article on temp-to-perm jobs just popped up on my MSN screen:
http://msn.careerbuilder.com/Article/MSN-2244-Flexwork-Freelance-and-PT-Six-Tips-for-Turning-a-Temporary-Gig-Into-Full-Time-Work/?SiteId=cbmsnjm42244&sc_extcmp=JS_2244_jobmod?GT1=23000

SmallFairy
05-27-2010, 06:55 PM
Best of luck to you BC, I really hope this will turn out well for you in the end!! as lots of others have stated, see it as a fresh oportunity to start your life over, who knows what the future will bring, it might be really exciting!:)

I'm not in the US, so I don't know what advice to give in the job hunt process, but I cross my fingers that you will find work you are happy with, with people that are nice and inspiring. (((hugs to you)))

*Jen*
05-27-2010, 07:17 PM
I also recommend joining a temping agency. It's not necessarily the type of employment you're looking for, but it's something.

Anita18
05-27-2010, 07:57 PM
There are many websites you can check. My last few jobs came from Craigslist. I've also checked Monster.com and CareerBuilder.com but I've found the best luck on Craigslist. Also, network. Ask friends or acquaintences if there are any openings in their companies or if they can keep an ear out for any openings.
Definitely ask friends and acquaintances. Many jobs nowadays are found on those kinds of connections. My sister, when she was having a really hard time finding a job because the economy was crap, hit up ALL of her professors from college. Of course it helped that she was only a few months out of graduation and made herself very memorable in all of her classes, but that's what it took. My friend had no leads at all after law school, but her dad found an opportunity for her at a former coworker's company. Another friend found an ongoing screenwriting gig from her second cousin.

I've seen very legitimate job postings on places like Craigslist as well, but DEFINITELY try hitting up your social circle. That way you automatically have someone who can vouch for you, instead of applying into a large system cold.

Cupid
05-27-2010, 09:19 PM
Many, many years ago, I quit a job I absolutely hated as I worked my butt off and was treated like poop. It was a small office. I had set a record for longest lasting employee (I was there just 4 months). It truly was a revolving door type situation.

To make a long story short, I knew he would not give me a good reference because I quit suddenly (young and foolish). I had a friend who was actually a hiring manager at another office call him to see what kind of reference he would give on me. I wanted to see if he would actually say I walked out or that I was a poor employee, or nothing at all. She said she called the jerk 3 times for a reference on me, and he never called back. :rolleyes:

Maybe if a friend could call for a reference on you just to see what they would say? Just an idea.

When you are asked why you left after 22 years, you could say something along the lines of it not being challenging anymore and at this point in your life, you needed to find something that would mentally stimulate you and give you reason to look forward to going to work each day. And that you quit before having anything lined up because you thought it would be deceitful to your past employer to be job-hunting on their time. Also say that you really liked the people there and that they liked you, but it is time for a change!

They'll believe that, I think. At least it will look like you're not hiding something.

The only drawback that I see arising is that since you came from such a large office, someone who interviews you may know someone who works there and verify what you said. But even if you don't say that and say you were let go, they would still call and get the scoop on you. So either way, you have nothing to lose.

It's worth a shot.

genevieve
05-27-2010, 09:31 PM
Also say that you really liked the people there and that they liked you, but it is time for a change!

They'll believe that, I think. At least it will look like you're not hiding something.

The only drawback that I see arising is that since you came from such a large office, someone who interviews you may know someone who works there and verify what you said. But even if you don't say that and say you were let go, they would still call and get the scoop on you. So either way, you have nothing to lose.
I would say she's got a lot to lose, actually. Considering the circumstances of the dismissal, getting caught in a lie, even a tiny one, during hiring would cause even more damage.

GarrAarghHrumph
05-27-2010, 09:59 PM
I would say she's got a lot to lose, actually. Considering the circumstances of the dismissal, getting caught in a lie, even a tiny one, during hiring would cause even more damage.

I agree. I'd rather she not lie. I'd like to find a way to explain why she left without saying too much, yet without lying.

Something like "worked there for 22 years, lots of bosses, all worked out. Recently new boss. Not a good match." And leave it at that.

This tells the truth. And it doesn't imply or say that she chose to leave, when the opposite is in fact true.

sk8pics
05-27-2010, 10:41 PM
Technically BC doesn't qualify for unemployment because she was fired for cause. That said, large companies often don't contest unemployment when a former employee applies even if they were fired for cause, so BC might want to give it a try anyway. There are many more resources made available there.

I thought you were eligible for unemployment only if you were fired, not if you quit. Or is it the "for cause" part that makes a difference? I recall an employee at a company I worked for being in trouble, and intending to quit, and the supervisor (actually did her a favor) and said, "No, no, don't quit. I'm going to fire you, and you'll be eligible for unemployment." It was a bad situation all around, but at least she got her unemployment.

BC, good luck to you. Take some time to mourn and heal and reflect, and I hope your job search goes well for you.

PDilemma
05-27-2010, 10:47 PM
I thought you were eligible for unemployment only if you were fired, not if you quit. Or is it the "for cause" part that makes a difference? I recall an employee at a company I worked for being in trouble, and intending to quit, and the supervisor (actually did her a favor) and said, "No, no, don't quit. I'm going to fire you, and you'll be eligible for unemployment." It was a bad situation all around, but at least she got her unemployment.

BC, good luck to you. Take some time to mourn and heal and reflect, and I hope your job search goes well for you.

Unemployment can vary from state to state. BC needs to check out what the policies in her state are to find out if she qualifies.

sk8pics
05-27-2010, 10:49 PM
Unemployment can vary from state to state. BC needs to check out what the policies in her state are to find out if she qualifies.

Ah, gotcha.

genevieve
05-27-2010, 10:51 PM
You are typically eligible for unemployment if you lose your job through no fault of your own. Sometimes, when an employee is fired for cause, the employer will allow the fired person to collect unemployment (anyone can FILE for unemployment, but the claim is sent to the employer, who can contest it based on the terms of the separation.

You can sometimes get unemployment if you choose to leave the job, but the burden of proof is on the employee. I worked somewhere once where a longtime employee quit with no notice and tried to get unemployment based on a hostile work environment, specifically naming one of the owners. She had never said a single thing to any other employee, including the general manager with whom she had been friends, so we reported that we had no idea what made the workplace hostile to her, nor did we have any chance to improve the situation for her. She did not get unemployment.

mrr50
05-28-2010, 12:34 AM
The federal government is an excellent employer http://www.usajobs.opm.gov

Flatfoote
05-28-2010, 12:44 AM
I agree. I'd rather she not lie. I'd like to find a way to explain why she left without saying too much, yet without lying.

Something like "worked there for 22 years, lots of bosses, all worked out. Recently new boss. Not a good match." And leave it at that.

This tells the truth. And it doesn't imply or say that she chose to leave, when the opposite is in fact true.

What about something along the lines of...

"Over the span of 22 years, people come and go and the culture of the office can change dramatically. I was able to adjust most of the time, but eventually the culture changed enough to where it was no longer a good fit, and it was time for me to seek a better fit."

If they ask you to elaborate on that, tell them you respectfully choose not to, as bringing in other people's personal business into your interview seems inappropriate to you.