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harekrishna43
05-27-2010, 03:55 AM
I hope you can get unemployment benefits from this job - that will give you some time to get the anger and grief out of your system. Just don't let it linger too long. You can even think of it as a mini summer vacation. It may take some time but you will find another job and hopefully it will be a better fit.

Aussie Willy
05-27-2010, 04:00 AM
Sometimes after spending a long tenure in one place, it helps to do some temp work. A lot of people will do that anyway while doing their job search. Besides earning some money, temping exposes you to a lot of different companies, and could lead to a permanent position - at which point you could decide whether or not to accept based on the office culture you experienced while temping.
I totally agree. I have had a couple of great jobs that I got out of doing temp work over the years (like my current one which has been my best job ever). Also worked out the ones I didn't want to stay at, even if I had been offered an opportunity.

Those who employ temps don't care what has happened in your past, as long as you can do the job, because they have trusted the agency to do that groundwork for them. I have found agencies generally are more sympathetic to those who have lost jobs because they do understand that jobs don't work out. After I lost a job working for a husband and wife team, the first comment I got from the agencies were they are the worst kind of employers to work for and were not surprised it hadn't lasted.

Agencies have always been my first avenue of employment after a job didn't work out. Looking for a permanent position can lead to the questions about why you left your previous employment which may make it more difficult to get a job and can probably make things a bit more uncomfortable with the questioning.

agalisgv
05-27-2010, 04:08 AM
Don't know if this would appeal at all to you BC, but you might consider going back to school. It will give you a break from everything, and it will either make you current in your present field, or give you skills to change careers. If you do the latter, you may bypass the whole reference question since your new field may not check-in if this is clearly a career change.

Just something to think about. Best of luck to you--

heckles
05-27-2010, 04:18 AM
Those who employ temps don't care what has happened in your past, as long as you can do the job, because they have trusted the agency to do that groundwork for them.

Not necessarily! It used to be that a person with a turbulent job history could bypass a company's background checks via temp-to-perm work, but that's not always the case anymore. In fact, some temps actually face twice the scrutiny of perm employees, because many temp agencies run extensive background checks, and then the client companies themselves run their standard background checks on potential temps.

Even if they don't do actual background checks, temp agencies nowadays tend to call all of the applicant's past jobs because the agencies learned that this provides an excuse to speak with supervisors at corporations and pitch the agency's services.

Anita18
05-27-2010, 04:24 AM
This has been my only place of employment, aside from some part time jobs before going to school, for 22 years. This company is the biggest employer in my city, and even in these times is almost considered 'employment for life', I make big $$ for the role I have that I will never make again the rest of my life, benefits and perks I will never gain again, so its a little upsetting knowing as of today I have no income all over a stupid email that YES I know is my fault.
Now's not the time to think about that. From your earlier emails, you sounded unhappy working with the people around you. Money and benefits aren't worth anything if you're unhappy. It really isn't.

It's time for a new start - think of all the possibilities! Lots of people here have suggested great options.

Moto Guzzi
05-27-2010, 04:39 AM
(((BaileyCatts))) I'm sorry it turned out this way. I hope you will find another job that you like and with people that you like. Good luck with the job search. It it difficult when you have been with a company for 22 years, but now you have to look forward and think positive. It's a new opportunity for you to succeed.

canbelto
05-27-2010, 04:46 AM
I'm so sorry BC. (((((((((((((((((Hugs)))))))))))))))))))))). But at the same time, think of this as a new opportunity. I know it's not easy to view it that way, but think about it:
1. Your boss wasn't willing to give you the benefit of the doubt, he just fired you over one mistake. I would not want to work for someone like that.
2. I think he also probably never made the boundaries of work email, etc. clearer to you. Again, that is his fault.
3. You don't have a good relationship with your co-workers. You'd be shocked how a change of environment can change things -- you might find people you like.

I know right now it's so hard to think positive, but you have to think that one day, the axe was going to fall. This is not a company that treats its employees well. If it wasn't this, it was going to be some other infraction. And again, had your boss valued your employment, a very stern talking to and warning would have sufficed.

Angelskates
05-27-2010, 05:00 AM
1. Your boss wasn't willing to give you the benefit of the doubt, he just fired you over one mistake. I would not want to work for someone like that.

Every single company has things, single things, you can be fired for (and not need to give severance) - accessing confidential information is usually one of them. It's a security breach. If you don't want to work for a company that can fire you over one mistake, regardless of what that mistake is, you should probably work for yourself.


2. I think he also probably never made the boundaries of work email, etc. clearer to you. Again, that is his fault.

How much clearer can you get than him saying he didn't want her accessing his email? Obviously her lawyer agreed, otherwise, she'd be getting severance. Again, BaileyCatts, knew she wasn't allowed access, she knew what she was doing wrong, and she did it anyway. There was no misunderstanding on BaileyCatts part, she understood the boundaries clearly.

I really don't understand how people can be defending BaileyCatts actions. It is possible to feel sorry for her and still understand that her company did the right thing.

agalisgv
05-27-2010, 05:06 AM
I think BC recognizes her errors. I don't think now is the right time to reiterate them.

Similarly, because BC recognizes her errors, I don't think it benefits her for people to go on how unjustly they may think she was treated. It rather defeats the point of encouraging her not to become bitter and to move on in a positive direction.

Ziggy
05-27-2010, 01:57 PM
I totally agree with Karina1974's post. It's difficult but you really need to try to let go in order to move on. Nothing worse than living in the past.

It looked as if you weren't very happy in that job anyhow. I definitely wouldn't want to be working in a place where I didn't get on with most of my coworkers. Try to look at it as a new opportunity to start doing something different, maybe ever re-train as agalisgv suggested. There's more to life than this. :)

BaileyCatts
05-27-2010, 03:32 PM
Question: how do you explain why you left your last position when the only thing on my resume is ONE company for 22 years? Like I said, this company is the biggest employer in my city, well known for 'employment for life', has not gone thru any downsizing ... what do you say was your reason for leaving? AND without having a job first? It would be different if I was simply job hunting while working .. you are looking for another opportunity. How do you answer that question if you were fired .. after 22 years?

Debbie S
05-27-2010, 04:15 PM
I would suggest simply saying that after 22 years in one company, you decided to pursue other opportunities, and say nothing more. They likely won't press you on it - people leave jobs for all sorts of reasons, the important thing is that you don't criticize your former employer. If you haven't already, you should find out what you former employer will say when a potential new employer calls to verify employment - generally, most companies won't discuss a reason for leaving, they'll just confirm employment dates, title, salary - you want to make sure you and your former employer are on the same page.

You mentioned that they didn't give you any forms that a terminated employee would get - did you get COBRA info? If not, you need to get that - the law requires them to give it to you.

agalisgv
05-27-2010, 04:24 PM
I would suggest simply saying that after 22 years in one company, you decided to pursue other opportunities, and say nothing more. I would add, "I wanted to pursue other opportunities, and that is why I wanted to work for this company...." Then I would wax poetic about how wonderful the company you are applying to is. That basically segues the question back to your interest in the new company, and off of a topic you don't really want to get into.

If you could take a class or two in a new area, then you could also mention that as the new direction you want to explore and how this new company seems like the perfect fit because you'll be able to draw upon your new skills in helping the company achieve x,y, and z. etc.

BaileyCatts
05-27-2010, 04:25 PM
. If you haven't already, you should find out what you former employer will say when a potential new employer calls to verify employment - generally, most companies won't discuss a reason for leaving, they'll just confirm employment dates, title, salary - you want to make sure you and your former employer are on the same page.

She said that is what they confirm .. employment dates, title, salary. Basically they just confirm that you worked there. She also said they would not provide references. How am I supposed to apply for jobs with no references? My boss said he would not provide a reference for me. Do companies really still require a list of references these days that they will call and want to speak about your abilities? I have a few friends I can use, but they are other administrators like me, not managers.




You mentioned that they didn't give you any forms that a terminated employee would get - did you get COBRA info? If not, you need to get that - the law requires them to give it to you.

No, I didn't. My sister also told me that too. When I escalated the issue to my HR person's boss about her not giving me any information whatsoever and not allowing me to come and pack my desk until "she" had the time, we set a time for Friday for me to come pack my desk and was told I would be given any forms. So I am hoping that is in there since my sister told me this is your medical insurance and its a ton of money, but you have to pay it because you need insurance. Is that right?

rfisher
05-27-2010, 04:27 PM
It really depends on the job in regarding to professional references. Almost all employers do a background check now. Many do indeed call former employers, but it depends. If they ask for professional references, they'll probably call. If they ask for personal references, they may not.