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ilovepaydays
05-24-2010, 01:03 PM
hell I would even take a demotion or a pay cut, I just don't want to lose my job at my company!

NO! NO! NO! NO! NO! NO! NO! NO!

Please believe that you are better than that. Trust me, it may take a lot of work in your job search, but there is always a better option that will come around. It may even be completely different than what you are doing right now. :)

Angelskates
05-24-2010, 01:33 PM
You have been an excellent employee to this point...

How is someone who gave herself access to, and read, their boss' email without permission an excellent employee? How is someone who admits she has an attitude problem and doesn't get along with her coworkers an excellent employee?


Do you want to be in a job where the punishment doesn't fit the crime, at all?

What do you think should happen to people who give themselves access to and read their boss' email without permission? And that's not even counting the fact she lied when confronted.


You are better than this company's treatment of you.


Please believe that you are better than that.

I don't really understand those who are saying BaileyCatts was an excellent employee and is better than her company's treatment of her. She read and gave herself access to information she didn't have permission to access. She read her boss' email without permission. This is cause for immediate dismissal in every place I have ever worked, and I think it should be. It's not only an invasion of privacy, but a security breach as well.

How is the company treating her poorly, when they are looking out for the company's best interests? What exactly is her company doing wrong here? They're paying her to stay home! She could be using that time to find another job (her current job may even be hoping she is).

BaileyCatts, to me, it seems like you're desperate to keep your job because you know you did the wrong thing and you think keeping your current job will someone absolve you of that. It won't. You did the wrong thing, lied about it, tried to back track, and now rightly fear for your job. You need a fresh start.

Keeping your job will take off some pressure (you won't have to find another job), but will add more - you'll have to work harder as you'll have to keep trying to earn the trust and respect you have lost back, you'll have to work there knowing you're being talked about, you'll be constantly wondering if people are believing you when you tell them something. Do you really want that?

You can move on from this, but IMHO you have to move on from this job in order to do that.

numbers123
05-24-2010, 04:10 PM
^^^^ word

Cupid
05-24-2010, 04:12 PM
After 20 years of service, I hardly think looking at someone's email accidently on purpose or whatever warrants this kind of treatment! She's been a faithful employee for a long time, and just because she had access to her boss's email (which he should have known about), she's going to get fired?

Plus, I don't know how old she is but there definitely is age discrimination going on when you go out on interviews. If you look youthful and fit, then you may be able to fool them into thinking that you're younger than you are. But then she has to give her work history and 20+ years on the job is going to make them wonder 'why now'? When I went on my last interview at which I got hired for the job, I revamped my resume to only reflect back on ten years. I could have gone 20+ and did on my old resume, and I didn't get any responses. Once I shaved off half my work experience, and started with a prestigious firm 10 years earlier, then the calls came.

I don't want to be discouraging or anything, but it's tough out there. I believe you said you were an administrative assistant, I see them advertising for assistants now at practically minimum wage. So if you're making good money there, stay but keep your eyes open for better opportunties.

overedge
05-24-2010, 06:00 PM
After 20 years of service, I hardly think looking at someone's email accidently on purpose or whatever warrants this kind of treatment! She's been a faithful employee for a long time, and just because she had access to her boss's email (which he should have known about), she's going to get fired?
.

And the company has given her excellent performance reviews. If the company has overlooked other problems, then that is the company's issue's, not BC's. The company is on very shaky legal ground if they try to fire her for performance problems they didn't alert her to or discuss with her.

Also, as I read it, the boss told BC not to worry about managing his calendar - which I interpreted not as "don't ever look at my email folder" but "it's OK, I'll take care of that stuff myself". If he absolutely didn't want her ever to go in there, he should have set his email account so that she didn't have access.

rvi5
05-24-2010, 06:29 PM
... 2. Taking away your laptop seems like they suspect you of a way bigger misdeed than the one you've told us of. Are you sure they don't actually suspect you of doing something else?For a simple case of snooping, whether deliberately or accidentally, the companies reaction seems excessive. I would think a reprimand would be the norm.

It is possible they suspect you of commercial espionage for a competitor. It may be they are overly paranoid. However, it is also possible they have been aware of information leaks, and are currently very sensitive to the subject. You just happen to have very poor timing.

In any case, there is no going back. Even if they eventually realize you are not a spy, it would be too uncomfortable having you around considering how far this situation has progressed.

Prancer
05-24-2010, 06:42 PM
For a simple case of snooping, whether deliberately or accidentally, the companies reaction seems excessive. I would think a reprimand would be the norm.

None of us really knows what's going on here, as we aren't privy to a lot of pertinent information, but I think that one critical factor in their response has to be that the email was sent to HR. HR handles a lot of personal and confidential information. Add to that the fact that the boss had already told BC that he didn't want her managing his email and that he clearly believed (from what he said to her at the time) that she was snooping.......I don't think it's all that excessive. What if that email had contained salary information or confidential employee info? It doesn't matter that that wasn't the case. It's the principle.

Moto Guzzi
05-24-2010, 06:55 PM
Management's reaction does seem excessive. It's one thing if they had proof that BaileyCatts had been accessing her boss's email on a regular basis, but a one-time accidental opening of an email should not be grounds for firing a long-term employee who has been receiving excellent performance reviews. It could be that the company is using this as an excuse to terminate an employee who is being paid at a higher rate than somebody who has been only a few years.

A friend of mine worked more than 20 years as an admin assistant at a large legal firm. When the firm started downsizing, she suddenly was shifted from working for one lawyer to being in a pool of admin assistants who filled in when admin assistants assigned to one lawyer were on leave. The ones assigned to the admin pool were the ones who had been with the firm for some time and were being paid a higher salary than the newer ones who were assigned to a lawyer. When the firm downsized again last October, the higher salaried pool workers lost their jobs. A similar thing happened at my doctor's office when the clerical people who had been there for years were let go while the more recently hired ones were kept.

Aceon6
05-24-2010, 07:30 PM
Management's reaction does seem excessive.

Hmmm, it doesn't seem excessive to me. They have concerns about a security breech. How the breech got there, and what the BC said about it notwithstanding, they perceive they have a security issue. I suspect a final decision is taking a while because they're developing policies, installing appropriate monitoring software, and deciding what to do about BC's situation.

numbers123
05-24-2010, 09:07 PM
And the company has given her excellent performance reviews. If the company has overlooked other problems, then that is the company's issue's, not BC's. The company is on very shaky legal ground if they try to fire her for performance problems they didn't alert her to or discuss with her.

There are some infractions that are considered so serious that termination is the disciplinary action regardless of excellent performance reviews in the past. Plus almost all states in the US are an "at will" employment. Meaning I don't have to have a reason to fire you - however, most companies will have documentation for the firing.


For a simple case of snooping, whether deliberately or accidentally, the companies reaction seems excessive. I would think a reprimand would be the norm.

In general, snooping, accidental or intentional, is considered a major infraction of the company's performance code/standards.


None of us really knows what's going on here, as we aren't privy to a lot of pertinent information, but I think that one critical factor in their response has to be that the email was sent to HR. HR handles a lot of personal and confidential information. Add to that the fact that the boss had already told BC that he didn't want her managing his email and that he clearly believed (from what he said to her at the time) that she was snooping.......I don't think it's all that excessive. What if that email had contained salary information or confidential employee info? It doesn't matter that that wasn't the case. It's the principle.

True, none of us have all the pertinent information. Prancer outlined one of the critical factors was the email was one sent to HR. And it doesn't matter if it was a highly confidential one or one that said good morning HR person, it is the principle of snooping/reading email not intended for your eyes.
And in today's business environment, your computer footprint identifies everywhere you have been, both inside and outside the company.

my little pony
05-24-2010, 11:03 PM
at everyplace I have worked so far, being on FSU on company time, especially while using their computer, was considered a worse infraction

Prancer
05-24-2010, 11:21 PM
True, none of us have all the pertinent information. Prancer outlined one of the critical factors was the email was one sent to HR. And it doesn't matter if it was a highly confidential one or one that said good morning HR person, it is the principle of snooping/reading email not intended for your eyes.

Well, that's true, and that's certainly an issue as well.

However, if an employee sees confidential employee information in HR records without proper authorization, the company can be sued for allowing to to happen. Snooping is bad, but certain types of snooping are worse in many ways than others.

Again, I don't know what went on. But if you get caught looking at someone else's email, whether intentionally or unintentionally, HR email is one you don't want to be looking at at the time.

Cupid
05-25-2010, 12:46 AM
at everyplace I have worked so far, being on FSU on company time, especially while using their computer, was considered a worse infraction

This has nothing to do with the original thread, but I surf the net all the time at work - I get my work done and it gets so boring. I volunteered my services on a few occasions to anyone who needed help, to which nobody responded. I don't think anyone there is overworked, so should I do their work while they are out on cigarette breaks?

What exactly can an employer see? They have an off-site IT company on call that they use for computer bugs and repairs, etc. So if they asked IT to search everybody's internet surfing, will it just show the websites you visit? Will it show your postings? Can they find out your passwords for your personal email accounts and read your email? I believe that I am not the only one who surfs a greater part of the day.

I do my job and I do it well, but I don't want to let on that I have nothing to do with 90% of my time, especially considering they basically told me after a glowing review that I pretty much capped out in regards to salary. Don't want them to consider laying me off, so for now, I try to look busy.

Angelskates
05-25-2010, 12:51 AM
at everyplace I have worked so far, being on FSU on company time, especially while using their computer, was considered a worse infraction

But that's because you've been given permission to read other employees' email right? I think if you were caught reading confidential information (whether it be files or emails), if you were reading or accessing information you weren't given permission to, it would be considered worse than reading FSU.

I think BaileyCatts' HR department is not trying to see if they can fire BaileyCatts for the breach, more likely they are trying to cover their arses in case they're sued, like Prancer mentioned. Whether BaileyCatts read all of the emails she gave herself access to or not, I don't know if it's able to be determined, but she could have - and that is a massive legal headache for HR.

Cupid, what an employer can see is dependent on them. But they can't access passwords etc. unless they have access to your computer and you click 'remember me' which means anyone who uses your computer can, but even then they don't know your password, but they can log on.

my little pony
05-25-2010, 12:53 AM
Per my employers, using non approved websites on their computer exposes them, their proprietary software and their clients to hackers, viruses, malware etc. My point is, some people are rather down on the OP and she did ask for opinions. But I find it ironic to criticize one type of action when some posters are clearly guilty of other infractions their employers would also frown on. And which is the worst offense will vary based on the employer.