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Robeye
04-30-2010, 02:22 AM
To say that Kim's performances at Vacouver "changed the face of figure skating forever" is a little bit OTT. How did those performances changed figure skating?

While "forever" may be a bit of a stretch, I'll put my Nostradamus cap on and predict that in ten years time (and perhaps as early as the next couple of seasons), the Kween's words will be vindicated. Just as Michelle was hugely influential for so many of the skaters that came after her, Yuna, whether she continues eligibility or not, is IMO going to be the prototype for those who eventually emerge as top-level skaters, whether they be Korean, Russian, Chinese, North American, European, or perhaps even Japanese.

The prototypical characteristics will include:
-body type. Long-limbed and wide shouldered but slim, and great lower body strength (although it has been said that Yuna's proportions are a kind of freak of nature for women that aren't fashion models, I could definitely envision, say, a Russian skater along these lines over the next few years).

-physical explosiveness. The body type mentioned above lends itself to generating speed and height (think Usain Bolt or a great NFL wideout like Randy Moss), resulting in ice coverage and +GOE jumps.

-authoritative jumps. The focus on GOE will become widespread. Not only great height and coverage, but also complex transitions, correct edges, confident landings, and great speed and flow in and out. If all this sounds familiar, it's because Yuna is the skater in whom the ideal that CoP had been groping for first came to mature fruition.

-musicality and expressiveness. IMO, this aspect has become one of Yuna's greatest strengths under Orser/Wilson. If you've ever seen her dance, you can see that her sense of rhythm and pace on ice is no accident (I would love to see her on DWTS at some point; I think she'd blow the field away, including Nicole :P). And the way she uses her arms, head, body as instruments of expressiveness has been rightly praised by Sonia Bianchetti as superlative. This combination of musicality and expressiveness, so hard to describe but immediately recognizable as a Yuna signature, is in my view going to be just as influential as her jumps.

Of course, I believe in the truism that no skater is perfect. Toe-point fetishism notwithstanding :shuffle: (is the smilie here showing the correct technique, I wonder?), I agree with the many who say that she could improve her stretch and line. But if I had to, ah, point to one ladies skater as the probable model for the next generation of elite skaters, I'm betting it will be Yuna.

Robeye
04-30-2010, 02:24 AM
Not meant to be critical at all. However, if I may, Kween's remark could be more than a praise for an occasion. Champions are role-models in a sense that kids learn from them -- be it about technique, style, etc. They influence the figure skaters of next generation. If Yuna embodies certain qualities, those qualities will be emulated by the young skaters, and her accomplishment at the biggest stage does amplify the influence.

Of course, it is not really about the color of the medal but about performance as it was Michelle Yuna tried to emulate -- you still see a good deal of Michelle in Yuna's skating. Yuna's performance might have inspired a few as Michelle's did Yuna.

Apologies, key65man. You beat me to the punch. Guess your post went up while I was writing mine. :lol:

key65man
04-30-2010, 02:34 AM
Apologies, key65man. You beat me to the punch. Guess your post went up while I was writing mine. :lol:

Actually, my compliment to you for making a great point. Thoroughly enjoyed it. :)

Yazmeen
04-30-2010, 02:39 AM
Nicely put, both of you!

jaws12345
04-30-2010, 05:58 AM
Not meant to be critical at all. However, if I may, Kween's remark could be more than a praise for an occasion. Champions are role-models in a sense that kids learn from them -- be it about technique, style, etc. They influence the figure skaters of next generation. If Yuna embodies certain qualities, those qualities will be emulated by the young skaters, and her accomplishment at the biggest stage does amplify the influence.

Of course, it is not really about the color of the medal but about performance as it was Michelle Yuna tried to emulate -- you still see a good deal of Michelle in Yuna's skating. Yuna's performance might have inspired a few as Michelle's did Yuna.

Figure skating is just like any other art forms; music, painting,... in a sense that one generation's greats inspire and influence those in the next generation. Soon-to-be stars - Murakami, Gao, Nagasu, Kwak, and more - either they said they want to be like Yuna or we already see a little bit of her in their performances.

Simone411
04-30-2010, 06:18 AM
Congratulations to Yuna and hats off to the Kween. Job well done, Michelle. :respec:

eyh201
04-30-2010, 09:30 AM
While "forever" may be a bit of a stretch, I'll put my Nostradamus cap on and predict that in ten years time (and perhaps as early as the next couple of seasons), the Kween's words will be vindicated. Just as Michelle was hugely influential for so many of the skaters that came after her, Yuna, whether she continues eligibility or not, is IMO going to be the prototype for those who eventually emerge as top-level skaters, whether they be Korean, Russian, Chinese, North American, European, or perhaps even Japanese.

The prototypical characteristics will include:
-body type. Long-limbed and wide shouldered but slim, and great lower body strength (although it has been said that Yuna's proportions are a kind of freak of nature for women that aren't fashion models, I could definitely envision, say, a Russian skater along these lines over the next few years).

-physical explosiveness. The body type mentioned above lends itself to generating speed and height (think Usain Bolt or a great NFL wideout like Randy Moss), resulting in ice coverage and +GOE jumps.

-authoritative jumps. The focus on GOE will become widespread. Not only great height and coverage, but also complex transitions, correct edges, confident landings, and great speed and flow in and out. If all this sounds familiar, it's because Yuna is the skater in whom the ideal that CoP had been groping for first came to mature fruition.

-musicality and expressiveness. IMO, this aspect has become one of Yuna's greatest strengths under Orser/Wilson. If you've ever seen her dance, you can see that her sense of rhythm and pace on ice is no accident (I would love to see her on DWTS at some point; I think she'd blow the field away, including Nicole :P). And the way she uses her arms, head, body as instruments of expressiveness has been rightly praised by Sonia Bianchetti as superlative. This combination of musicality and expressiveness, so hard to describe but immediately recognizable as a Yuna signature, is in my view going to be just as influential as her jumps.

Of course, I believe in the truism that no skater is perfect. Toe-point fetishism notwithstanding :shuffle: (is the smilie here showing the correct technique, I wonder?), I agree with the many who say that she could improve her stretch and line. But if I had to, ah, point to one ladies skater as the probable model for the next generation of elite skaters, I'm betting it will be Yuna.

ITA! :respec: Again, congratulations to Yuna!

Plus, Kwan = class!

Is it the first time for a skater to be included in 'Time 100 Most Influential' list?

clara00
04-30-2010, 09:40 AM
Wow, congratulations!! Yuna :cheer:

Kwan is so nice :saint:

shine
04-30-2010, 09:46 AM
nvm.

barbk
04-30-2010, 04:43 PM
To say that Kim's performances at Vacouver "changed the face of figure skating forever" is a little bit OTT. How did those performances changed figure skating?

Well, since the end of figures, we haven't had too many OGM ladies winners who won both the SP & the LP at the Olympics with outstanding technical performances:

1992 - Kristi - won with a fall
1994 - Baiul -- I defy anyone to call her technical performance outstanding
1998 - Tara - didn't win the SP
2002 - Sarah - didn't win the SP and actually rather bombed it
2006 - Shizuka -- did not deliver an outstanding LP technical performance
2010 - Kim -- by my count the first woman to win both SP & LP with really outstanding tech performances.

French Quarter
04-30-2010, 09:22 PM
To say that Kim's performances at Vacouver "changed the face of figure skating forever" is a little bit OTT. How did those performances changed figure skating?

Ask Kwan. I'm sure she knows about figure skating better than you do.

Rock2
04-30-2010, 09:56 PM
While I believe the feelings and thoughts reflected in the quote are sincere, I'd bet 25 bucks that the quote was written or highly edited by someone other than MK. She's a smart and I'm sure deep-thinking woman, but there is nothing I've ever heard her say that leads me to believe she can be that eloquent without a lot of help.

tkhm
04-30-2010, 10:02 PM
While I believe the feelings and thoughts reflected in the quote are sincere, I'd bet 25 bucks that the quote was written or highly edited by someone other than MK. She's a smart and I'm sure deep-thinking woman, but there is nothing I've ever heard her say that leads me to believe she can be that eloquent without a lot of help.

As a MK fan I take offense.

skatesindreams
04-30-2010, 10:07 PM
Why must some here find reason to belittle/doubt whatever Ms. Kwan does?
I'm sure that someone who is working on a Master's degree can write a cogent statement in honor of another person!

FSUSF
04-30-2010, 10:09 PM
While I believe the feelings and thoughts reflected in the quote are sincere, I'd bet 25 bucks that the quote was written or highly edited by someone other than MK. She's a smart and I'm sure deep-thinking woman, but there is nothing I've ever heard her say that leads me to believe she can be that eloquent without a lot of help.

Feel sour? eh?