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Skittl1321
04-04-2010, 02:31 AM
I think the issue of the stir fry is that Jamie measured 1 1/3 cup or whatever per serving before cooking, and the woman was eyeing-balling post-cooking, where it would be signfignatly less than that.

Or the stupid USDA guidelines require that the vegetable is seperate.

KatieC
04-04-2010, 12:44 PM
I thought the kookiest part was considering a french fry a vegetable. :confused: That's like saying a sundae counts for fruit because of the cherry on top.

bobalina77
04-04-2010, 04:35 PM
Or counting strawberry jello as fruit because it has fruit flavouring.

Prancer
04-04-2010, 07:14 PM
I wouldn't give up on them yet - if there are good reviews, it's worth a shot.

Four retired farmers told me yesterday that they use them and get bushels of great tomatoes, so someone must be having some success with them.

MacMadame
04-06-2010, 05:57 AM
Or they could work the way my family worked - if I didn't like what was served, I didn't eat.
That's how we do it at my house.

I don't think forcing kids to eat things they claim not to like is a good idea if you want your kids to grow up with a healthy relationship with food. But some parents just can't stand the idea of their kids going hungry so they do cater to them and keep trying to make things they like. This is a bad idea too IMO as it just changes the battle, but it still makes food and eating a battlefield.


My husband was disgusted by the kids' lack of knowledge of vegetables until Jamie held up the eggplant. Hubby turned to me with a blank look on his face and shrugged. :rofl:
I wanted them to show a leek. My kids actually know what that is! But I have to admit that I don't know what a lot of the more exotic veggies are. I have recipe books that talk about stuff that I have no idea what it is and I have to look them up on the internet before I go shopping! :lol:


From what I've read, part of the problem is that school districts slashed their food service budgets in order to save money. As a result, they no longer hire enough cafeteria staff to prepare meals from scratch. Instead they rely upon prepared foods the cafeteria staff merely need to heat before serving.
That's how it worked at my kids' public school. The food was awful -- lukewarm grilled cheese sandwiches, "burritos" what were just beens and tortillas ... I met my kid for lunch a lot and ate the food too and I was appalled. But a lot of the stuff that ends up in packed lunches wasn't that hot either. Plus kids wouldn't necessarily eat what they brought. A LOT of food ends up in the trash or traded around.

Just like on the show.

I remember being unimpressed with the food in my cafeteria when I was a kid - bland, overcooked, too much starch and fat, etc. -- but it was 100x better than what they are serving these days.

I'm actually glad to hear that a lot of what we are seeing is staged. I was just appalled at some of the resistance Jamie was getting and it's nice to know that the people weren't quite that moronic!

Anita18
04-06-2010, 06:14 AM
That's how we do it at my house.

I don't think forcing kids to eat things they claim not to like is a good idea if you want your kids to grow up with a healthy relationship with food. But some parents just can't stand the idea of their kids going hungry so they do cater to them and keep trying to make things they like. This is a bad idea too IMO as it just changes the battle, but it still makes food and eating a battlefield.
I don't think forcing a picky kid to eat something causes any real long-term damage. Now that I think about it I was a pretty headstrong kid at times and sometimes went to bed hungry or ate things I didn't like. But I eat anything pretty freely now and I don't think the whole thing did me much harm. My sister's the same way. She used to hate seafood so much she used to throw shrimp under the table at restaurants. :rofl: She still dislikes seafood but is more open-minded to it.

IMO the real harm is using unhealthy foods as rewards (especially to get the kid to eat the stuff they're picky about), or the parents having an unhealthy relationship with food themselves (whether they overeat or diet excessively). Kids pick up on that, especially when the parents have an unhealthy relationship with food.


I wanted them to show a leek. My kids actually know what that is! But I have to admit that I don't know what a lot of the more exotic veggies are. I have recipe books that talk about stuff that I have no idea what it is and I have to look them up on the internet before I go shopping! :lol:
We went to the Santa Monica Community Gardens this weekend and I was so giddy I got to see an artichoke coming out of a plant. :rofl:

And I still don't know what a lot of the vegetable plants look like. I can only identify it if it's got something familiar growing on it.

bobalina77
04-06-2010, 05:26 PM
I was never forced to eat things I didn't like. I was a pretty picky eater but mom never made me something different, she just made sure there was something incorporated in the meal that I did like so I at least ate something. She usually made a variety of veggies though because not everyone in the family likes the same thing.. sometimes I liked all of the veggies (if it was broccolli and carrots) and ate all of them and sometimes I only liked some of them (like if it was carrots and brussel sprouts.. even to this day I don't like brussel sprouts).. but at least I was getting veggies. She never made a whole different meal for me though.

KatieC
04-07-2010, 12:30 AM
I was never forced to eat things I didn't like. I was a pretty picky eater but mom never made me something different, she just made sure there was something incorporated in the meal that I did like so I at least ate something.

... even to this day I don't like brussel sprouts).. but at least I was getting veggies. She never made a whole different meal for me though.

Still won't eat Brussel sprouts - they're revolting! :)

My mum was pretty much the same - I was a notorious "picky" eater but my mum made sure that at least one vegetable was one I would eat - like corn, carrots, peas or green beans. My sister held Thanksgiving dinner at her place one year, she served turkey, cauliflower, squash, broccoli and mashed potatoes - on white plates. Since I only liked the white meat and the mashed potatoes, the plate looked so hideous my aunt went into the kitchen and boiled up some frozen peas in a pot! :)

My mum did try to force me to eat fish and eggs - by making me sit at the table until the plate was empty, but there was a ledge under the kitchen table that could hold some food, and a hungry cat under there too. That wonderful cat (named Prancer!) ate my fish and eggs. I still don't eat either of them.

oleada
04-07-2010, 01:43 AM
I was the picky eating child from hell. HELL. I was one of those kids who would starve rather than eating anything I dislike. I honestly feel bad for some parents because although it's rare, this model of child does exist and I was one. My mom is an incredibly healthy eater, a fantastic cook and my brother will eat anything you serve him but she was baffled by my picky eating and to this day doesn't know how she got through it. Every meal was a battle. Honestly, it got to the point where I got made a special meal because I just would not eat. The only things I liked until age 8 or so were: grilled chicken, plantains (the only thing resembling a vegetable that would even touch), eggs, pizza, orange juice (but only with no pulp), meatballs (but not any kind of red meat - not even burgers), lasagna (but not any other kind of pasta), cheese and yogurt. Things I didn't like: all fruits, beans, red meat, fish, spaghetti, salads, hamburgers, hot dogs...the list goes on and on.

However, even though my mom gave in and made me a separate meal, it wasn't junk food. It was eggs for breakfast, grilled chicken and plantains or rice and a sandwich or something else like that for dinner. They still made really good food for themselves and the option for me to eat it was always there. As I grew older, I grew out of my pickiness and now I'll try anything and like a lot of different things. But like I said, my mom was always a great cook, made meals for us and taught us how to eat healthily. And that's clearly not the case in this show.

Jenny
04-07-2010, 01:33 PM
One of the best tips I read was in a women's magazine decades ago: in this woman's family, every person (including mom and dad) were allowed to have 3 things that they never had to eat, and the list was posted on the fridge for all to see. She noted that the interesting thing was that as she introduced new foods to her family, they'd change the list and decide that the thing they used to hate wasn't so bad after all.

escaflowne9282
04-07-2010, 03:06 PM
I'm watching this tonight while I try to decide what I want for dinner...Sonic? McDonalds? Wendys? How awful....

I'd have picked Sonic if I were you ...:P

Habs
04-07-2010, 04:11 PM
I've already made three recipes out of my brand new JO Food Revolution cookbook! All have been fantastic! :cheer:

bobalina77
04-07-2010, 04:33 PM
One of the best tips I read was in a women's magazine decades ago: in this woman's family, every person (including mom and dad) were allowed to have 3 things that they never had to eat, and the list was posted on the fridge for all to see. She noted that the interesting thing was that as she introduced new foods to her family, they'd change the list and decide that the thing they used to hate wasn't so bad after all.

That wouldn't have worked with me.. I was beyond stubborn about the things I didn't like and it was extremely hard to get me to try new things as a kid. I'm still a little reluctant to try new things but I'm much better than I was as a kid. I personally think that some kid's palates just aren't mature enough to handle some things. In fact I wasn't even a kid the first time I tried asparagus and didn't like it, I was in my late teens.. and now it's one of my fave veggies.

I must say that most of my issues with food was texture related more than anything.. and it still is. For example I can eat onion in something as long as it's cooked really really well (so it's super soft) because I don't like the crunch they make. If I don't know they're there I can eat them. Same with mushrooms. They seem slimy to me. So.. if mom was making something with either of those she either cut them up super tiny so I couldn't see them or, if the recipe didn't permit that, really big so I could pick them out :lol:

Lurking Skater
04-07-2010, 08:03 PM
I've already made three recipes out of my brand new JO Food Revolution cookbook! All have been fantastic! :cheer:

I haven't has a chance to use my FR cookbook yet. So many things sound fab, though!

I wish that he'd put that chicken and veggie stir fry recipie that he served to the HS kids this past episode up on his site. That looked delicious.

Habs
04-07-2010, 08:27 PM
I wish that he'd put that chicken and veggie stir fry recipie that he served to the HS kids this past episode up on his site. That looked delicious.

I had the exact same thought. I read the cookbook cover to cover looking for that recipe. I wuzrobbed. :drama: