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Anita18
05-05-2011, 11:29 PM
The triple axel sounds...unlikely, to be charitable, and unwise given the stress fracture. Not getting hooked in with a new coach this summer in the Palo Alto area sounds even less desirable.

But as for the labs -- many Stanford athletes major in sciences, and somehow Stanford manages to make the labs work for them. I don't see that Flatt's experience should be different than any of the swimmers who regularly get sent to international competitions during Stanford's school year.
Yeah, but at the same time, you gotta wonder how much of the Stanford experience she'd get if she was always got exceptions for classes and labs. You're surrounded by super-smart people, a huge part of the experience there is spending time with them.

My sister went to Stanford and the only athletes she was close with were the male volleyball players. (They won the NCAA title the year after she graduated.) Most of them didn't major in the sciences, I think only one person on the team did.

reese
05-05-2011, 11:30 PM
But as for the labs -- many Stanford athletes major in sciences, and somehow Stanford manages to make the labs work for them. I don't see that Flatt's experience should be different than any of the swimmers who regularly get sent to international competitions during Stanford's school year.

Phil Hersh published an article in the weeks before Worlds where he interviewed the athletic director at Stanford and the director said Rachael would really not be getting special treatment, as she's not a Stanford athlete. She won't be, for example, getting any preferential treatment re: training facilities. I would also imagine she won't get the same slack Stanford athletes get when it comes to classes vs. competitive commitments.

madm
05-05-2011, 11:34 PM
I study chemical engineering! Wow, I admire her for doing this AND figure skating at the same time. I don't know how it works at Stanford, but where I study you spend whole afternoons in the lab, and you fluke if you don't attend...

When will she have time to skate? During the night and weekends? I suppose she could skip lectures and group studies and just read those things up on her own...

My daughter is a college student and high level skater too majoring in biology, and she has always been able to sign up for evening lab sessions to accomodate skating in the afternoons. Her professors and lab assistants figure out a way for her to make up labs or attend another lab section when she goes to Nationals and Sectionals. It's certainly do-able. And during freshman year a lot of the classes are fulfilling general requirements so the lab load shouldn't be too bad the first year.

barbk
05-05-2011, 11:35 PM
Phil Hersh published an article in the weeks before Worlds where he interviewed the athletic director at Stanford and the director said Rachael would really not be getting special treatment, as she's not a Stanford athlete. She won't be, for example, getting any preferential treatment re: training facilities. I would also imagine she won't get the same slack Stanford athletes get when it comes to classes vs. competitive commitments.

Stanford made some schedule adaptations for Debi Thomas, and I believe that they've also done so for some other athletes who competed in sports Stanford doesn't offer. I don't think Stanford has an ice arena, so I am not sure what training facilities would be meant. The regular (available to any Stanford student) gym facilities are rather nice and ought to be quite suitable for off-ice conditioning and training. Stanford has had other elite skaters in the recent past, and I haven't heard of insurmountable problems. Rachel is clearly quite smart and has already demonstrated great time management skills. I doubt that will change.

Anita18
05-05-2011, 11:37 PM
Phil Hersh published an article in the weeks before Worlds where he interviewed the athletic director at Stanford and the director said Rachael would really not be getting special treatment, as she's not a Stanford athlete. She won't be, for example, getting any preferential treatment re: training facilities. I would also imagine she won't get the same slack Stanford athletes get when it comes to classes vs. competitive commitments.
Probably wouldn't get exceptions to SKIP labs or classes, but you'd be surprised at how accommodating some professors are if you show commitment. Then again I went to a very small school where my organic chemistry prof would know who was missing during a test (seriously - she'd look into the lecture hall and know who was missing) and call our dorm rooms. :rofl: I don't think it's quite the same as Stanford, but I'm sure you can get some leeway if you show commitment.

OlieRow
05-06-2011, 12:07 AM
But as for the labs -- many Stanford athletes major in sciences, and somehow Stanford manages to make the labs work for them. I don't see that Flatt's experience should be different than any of the swimmers who regularly get sent to international competitions during Stanford's school year.

In undergrad, I was a D1 athlete taking pre-med courses (although not at Stanford :)) and while it's doable, it won't be easy. As an official student athlete (meaning competing for the school) I was always in the first group of students to register for classes which helped me get the labs that were the best for my practice schedule. Had I been a regular freshman/sophomore, I would have had last pick of the labs for bio/chem/o-chem. Having all of our training on campus was also a huge advantage that Rachel won't have. A 30-60 min. commute to the rink will really eat into her time and take away from the "normal" aspects of college life. I've been told I "missed out" on parts of that, although I wouldn't change a thing.

She seems to have the drive to make it work, but it'll be a big challenge to balance chemical engineering with competing at the elite level.

Triple Butz
05-06-2011, 12:17 AM
Triple axel? :lol: Maybe she should put out a 3-3 first..

Or maybe instead of wasting the summer practicing ridiculously hard jumps that cause injury (see all of her past summer training ideas) she should work with a dancer or trainer to improve her posture and take edge classes to learn how to actually skate and move across the ice with flow.

ETA: AFA training and going to school, I managed to get two degrees out of Yale while working two jobs, one in Delaware, one in Las Vegas. It's certainly difficult, but most professors are excited for you and will do their best to accommodate. I would imagine Rachael is even more driven than I am, so I don't think the schedule will be her main problem. I know she will do the work, my question is, will she have someone guiding her in the right direction or not?

Pikachuusb
05-06-2011, 12:23 AM
I think she should let her leg heal, forget about a triple axle and study well at Stanford. I wish her luck in her future endeavors.

stjeaskategym
05-06-2011, 12:23 AM
College without extracurricular activities can be very dull and boring. Granted, high level skating is not a regular activity by any means, but I don't think Rachael should be in a state of panic about trying to balance academics with athletics. There are plenty of students who will balance school, sports, and jobs. I doubt Rachael will be getting a job, so hopefully that will leave her with enough free time. For her sake, hopefully she will have professors who are understanding and willing to help her with any scheduling conflicts. I'm sure chemical engineering is a very demanding major, but every kid is different in terms of how much time and effort they need to put into school to do well. The kids who barely have to study for exams to get A's make me jealous. :lol:

RD
05-06-2011, 12:29 AM
Full course load in chemical engineering at Stanford goes with the GP series about as well as a tibia fracture of the push-off leg goes with World Championships.

Yeah...that.

Seriously, if she can manage that...manage to stay competent in skating...she HAS to be given mad props. But I don't think it will happen.

reese
05-06-2011, 12:32 AM
New article: http://www.gazette.com/articles/stanford-117566-broadmoor-done.html Flatt has officially "severed ties" with Tom Zzzzzzzz, as expected. No new info.

ETA: This might have been posted here earlier today. Sorry if I missed it.

Cheylana
05-06-2011, 12:43 AM
Or maybe instead of wasting the summer practicing ridiculously hard jumps that cause injury (see all of her past summer training ideas) she should work with a dancer or trainer to improve her posture and take edge classes to learn how to actually skate and move across the ice with flow.
That sounds like a great idea. Hopefully her new coach (whoever that will be) will nudge her in that direction.


Worlds were “definitely bittersweet” and “definitely sad” for Flatt, not because of a stress fracture in her right tibia that gave her a “lack of belief” in her routines. It marked her last competition under Zakrajsek, who praised Flatt for “continuing to move forward,” as she deferred admission to Stanford for a year. “She has had her best international season.”
Let's see, disastrous last place at GPF + disastrous 12th place showing at Worlds = best international season? Must be that new Zakrajsek math :rolleyes:

IceAlisa
05-06-2011, 01:03 AM
Or maybe instead of wasting the summer practicing ridiculously hard jumps that cause injury (see all of her past summer training ideas) she should work with a dancer or trainer to improve her posture and take edge classes to learn how to actually skate and move across the ice with flow.

Ya think? :wall:

MoreIce
05-06-2011, 01:09 AM
I am still wondering who she will find in the stanford area as a coach? My hopes are with Ponomarenko and Klimova only because they could definitely help the skating aspect of her skating!

chipso1
05-06-2011, 01:35 AM
Let's see, disastrous last place at GPF + disastrous 12th place showing at Worlds = best international season? Must be that new Zakrajsek math :rolleyes:

To be fair, he was probably referring to her two GP medals (a first for Rachael) and her qualificaiton to the GPF (also a first for her).