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cailuj365
04-10-2010, 05:50 PM
Well, I'm going to go see him skate at the end of this month for the opening performance of Ice Theatre in NYC. I don't know if he has anything planned after that.


OMG Johnny and Adam Lambert at the same event? Now that would be epic. :D

Yes. Yes, it would.

jlai
04-10-2010, 06:14 PM
Even nowadays, he looks very out of shape in his gala performances.

Do you mean he looks labored and slow or he has trouble with his jumps? A curious mind wants to know. :)

igniculus
04-10-2010, 06:49 PM
Do you mean he looks labored and slow or he has trouble with his jumps? A curious mind wants to know. :)

Yes, I got that impression. I mean, I only watched the clips on youtube as I was obviously not present at these galas, but he did looked like he needed a lot of effort to perform. I'd bet my money he is not even training anymore regularly.

pairsskater
04-10-2010, 07:16 PM
Well, I saw him in Bensenville, and thought he looked pretty good considering he was in Moscow the day before and had just stepped off a plane 6 hrs. before he skated. He wasn't perfect, but he was exhausted.

It really didn't matter to that crowd anyway----screaming all the way. Camera flashes constantly throughout both his programs, he could have been a human zamboni (and he wasn't) and they would've loved him.

RebeccaCP
04-11-2010, 11:34 AM
Thank you again, overedge. Now that Johnny has tweeted that there's a book in his future, I can sit back and mentally comment back, "Well, I can hope, but there are a lot of steps to get through first!"

In the meantime, I hope he "publishes" another blog soon, since he was working on a blog for his site last night, according to his Twitter.

Holley Calmes
04-11-2010, 10:44 PM
One last publishing-like question: Would someone who may or may not have written a few chapters of an autobiography and is "shopping a book" have an book/literary agent? Should they?

..... If you were dead serious on getting a deal, would you want/need a book agent during the "shopping" process? Would he be taken more seriously?

If you aren't a celeb, I can guarantee you would need a literary agent. A good friend of mine is published by Knopf-she's had four young adult novels published over the past ten years or so, and they've won awards, etc, so she is a serious and respected author. I have gone on the journey with her, so to speak. Her experience was quite the norm, she says.

She had to have two complete manuscripts to submit to the best literary agents, and then it took her awhile to find an agent who was really in sync with her style and what she wanted to do. It's almost like a marriage....It took her over two years to land this agent, but it's been worth it.

This agent also keeps asking for new manuscripts to shop different publishing houses. Sometimes she will reject a whole manuscript or have her rewrite parts. She helps her think through things-not as an editor but almost, to me, like a "pre-editor." Or like a marketing person to help her make a work more attractive for her to shop.

I think maybe in some genres you can submit a few chapters to entice agents or publishers. I'd like to think so because I'd like to do it! Maybe with mysteries-the pulp variety, and romances. But serious lit, political commentary, biography with serious publishers, I'm not so sure. Maybe someone who has broader experience can tell us, but I did want to relate my friend's experiences.

I've written a whole murder mystery, but it needs work....

The other route is self publishing, but that is not taken seriously by reviewers and bookstores, with a few notable and rare exceptions like "The Shack." I have another friend at Barnes and Noble who laughs about self-publishing authors who think they can come into a B&N store and have their own book signing and sell their books!

But I'm sure Johnny's general agent will take very good care to make sure he's published! That's part of her job, too, I should think-to link him to literary people.

Prancer
04-11-2010, 10:57 PM
I think maybe in some genres you can submit a few chapters to entice agents or publishers. I'd like to think so because I'd like to do it! Maybe with mysteries-the pulp variety, and romances. But serious lit, political commentary, biography with serious publishers, I'm not so sure. Maybe someone who has broader experience can tell us, but I did want to relate my friend's experiences.

I used to help run a writer's workshop where we had professional writers come in and advise people on writing and how to get published. The process described was always so arduous and rather haphazard that I wondered how it was that so many people who really can't write ever end up being published. You'd think that only the few, the brave, the really talented and the compulsive would make it through.


The other route is self publishing, but that is not taken seriously by reviewers and bookstores, with a few notable and rare exceptions like "The Shack."

I think that to some degree that is changing, as the number of successful self publishing authors grows. It's still not the way I would go, and a vanity press is usually a good way to end up with a box of dusty books sitting in your attic that make for (un)enthusiastically received Christmas gifts, but self-publishing is not quite the last resort of the desperate hack that it used to be.

Holley Calmes
04-11-2010, 11:07 PM
Ah, so there's hope for me after all, eh Prancer? :lol:

My husband published a book of his dance photos (2 actually) on blurb.com, and we've done well with them. But that's a really specialty, art book kind of thing, and he has a built-in following. It was done just to say "he did it." But to be honest, although I'm not impressed with the binding, the printing and overall quality are quite good! Printing has changed so much.....

Thanks Prancer-I'm glad to know the publishing world is evolving.

Wyliefan
04-11-2010, 11:21 PM
I think that to some degree that is changing, as the number of successful self publishing authors grows. It's still not the way I would go, and a vanity press is usually a good way to end up with a box of dusty books sitting in your attic that make for (un)enthusiastically received Christmas gifts, but self-publishing is not quite the last resort of the desperate hack that it used to be.

I agree, the stigma isn't quite as bad as it was, especially with the option of online publishing (Lulu.com, etc.). Which is great for me, as my first book didn't find a publisher (despite having an agent) and I'm looking into that option now!

Prancer
04-11-2010, 11:34 PM
I agree, the stigma isn't quite as bad as it was, especially with the option of online publishing (Lulu.com, etc.). Which is great for me, as my first book didn't find a publisher (despite having an agent) and I'm looking into that option now!

Good luck! :)

It's much harder to write a book than most people think. It's not just putting words together well, which is something that many people can do; it's controlling the overall structure and maintaining cohesion that is :scream:.

azskatefan
04-12-2010, 12:23 AM
I hope he has someone other than his agent helping him with this book... or else it will never happen.

BreakfastClub
04-12-2010, 12:44 AM
Hello people...

... if a no name like Jon Jackson could get the sometimes rambling and inconsistently written "On Edge" published, Johnny Weir should have no trouble finding an agent and getting a deal for a scathing skating tell-all.

Can't wait to get my hands on it the second it's published! :cheer2:

REO
04-12-2010, 04:20 AM
I think being a celeb, even just a skater, would be a pass on alot of the stuff the average Joe has to go through to get published. Johnny has fans which are ready made customers for the book. I have no idea how many people follow him on Facebook or Twitter and Johnny's Angels alone number over 1000 or close to it. It's all about the bottom line for any publisher. I wonder how many books sold is considered a success.

made_in_canada
04-12-2010, 05:36 AM
Hello people...

... if a no name like Jon Jackson could get the sometimes rambling and inconsistently written "On Edge" published, Johnny Weir should have no trouble finding an agent and getting a deal for a scathing skating tell-all.

Can't wait to get my hands on it the second it's published! :cheer2:

Lol... I just finished reading that book. Got it in a 99 cent bin! That is one terribly written book!

Prancer
04-12-2010, 05:41 AM
I think being a celeb, even just a skater, would be a pass on alot of the stuff the average Joe has to go through to get published.

I have no trouble at all thinking Johnny has a real publisher, and probably a pretty big one, as opposed to the now-defunct imprint Jon Jackson went through.

The problem will be actually writing the book. Most people think they could do it; few actually can. And like I said before, it's not because they can't write, exactly, more that they can't write a book.

I don't know if Johnny can do it or not, so that's no reflection on him. A lot of people who write very well cannot write books; a lot of people who don't write very well at all can.

It's one of those things that make a lot of people with unpublished manuscripts grind their teeth.


I wonder how many books sold is considered a success.

That depends on how much they pay the author to write the book, how many copies they print and how many of those copies sell without being returned. For publishers, the most important thing is "sell-through," or profit made after returns are accounted for.

This kind of explains it: http://www.pubassist.com/sellthrough.asp

So it's not so much numbers sold, as numbers sold relative to other factors.