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RFOS
06-23-2010, 02:27 PM
Yes, and people think they are giving it a French pronunciation. And when I say "umlaut," no one knows what I mean or why it matters.


I can't believe I'm questioning Prancer on this, but isn't it a trema, not an umlaut? :shuffle:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Umlaut_(diacritic)

*Runs and hides* ;)

pumba
06-23-2010, 02:28 PM
IMHO any standardization in language (names in particular) is harmful for culture. Why changing something that has been developed through generations and is a peculiarity of a certain region? I don't mind my country being called Russia, when it is Rossiya, and I hope e.g. the German people don't mind being called Nemtzy. Differences make life more interesting to explore :)
The good old Anais :)

cruisin
06-23-2010, 02:41 PM
IMHO any standardization in language (names in particular) is harmful for culture. Why changing something that has been developed through generations and is a peculiarity of a certain region? I don't mind my country being called Russia, when it is Rossiya, and I hope e.g. the German people don't mind being called Nemtzy. Differences make life more interesting to explore :)
The good old Anais :)

I'm not making a judgement, it just seems peculiar. It would seem to me that formal names would be the same in all languages. Less confusing :D. I spent a few minutes with a friend looking at a map of Italy. She couldn't find Florence. She had no idea that Firenze was Florence. Possibly, with some, it started with misspellings. As in Russia may have been how English speaking people thought Rossiya was spelled. Then the pronunciation shifted with the spelling. But some are so different, that spelling can't explain it.

pumba
06-23-2010, 03:02 PM
Sure there are several linguistic processes that lead to a complete change of spelling. On some maps you will never find Beijing and will see Peking instead and vice versa (in Russian it also starts with P, so searching for this city on an English map can really be confusing). In other cases - say Montenegro - the names are simply translated. In English you don't call this country "The Blackmountain" translating it from French, or whatever it is, but in Russian it will be Tchernogoria - a translation... Sometimes the names have nothing to do with the "right" ones at all, and certain cultures have their own words to call nationalities and countries (see Nemtzy) - this is due to historical background (wars, trade, religion, etc..). I am not actually arguing, but probably trying to show that after a couple of minutes of simple research - the "problem" can be solved + bringing certain satisfaction from knowing something new :COP:.

Cyn
06-23-2010, 05:18 PM
In south Georgia, there's a town named "Albany." People get confused all the time by pronouncing it like one would Albany, NY, but the way it's said by locals (and most Georgians I know), it's Al (like the name) - Benny.

Most Yankees I've talked with think it's :rofl: . Locals from that area, not so much :lol: .

Prancer
06-23-2010, 08:10 PM
Whether or not it's a deliberate pronunciation, it's still funny to those who know how it is pronounced in the original language.

In NJ we say Newark - New-erk, In DE they say New-ark. They say it right in DE. That doesn't change the way we say it in NJ, but we're wrong.

Well, no, you aren't wrong. That's how you pronounce the word. Language is not that hard and fast.


I can't believe I'm questioning Prancer on this, but isn't it a trema, not an umlaut? :shuffle:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Umlaut_(diacritic)

*Runs and hides* ;)

:lol: Um, yeah.

vesperholly
06-23-2010, 11:33 PM
Something I've always wondered about: Why do we have different names for foreign countries and cities? Eg: Why do we call Italia Italy? Why do we call Firenze Florence? Why do we call Espana Spain? Why don't we just call them by their rightful names? this is not just in English, every language has a version of country/city names that are not what they are called in that place. It seems odd that it's not standardized.

Angelicization (translation into English) used to be very popular, so most countries and cities were given Angelicized names, like Rome instead of Roma and Finland instead of Suomi. It's not so popular nowadays. A recent case that comes to mind is India they've rejected Angelicization. Bombay is now Mumbai and Madras is now Chennai.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anglicisation

IceAlisa
06-27-2010, 05:32 AM
An article on unusual scents from yahoo: http://shopping.yahoo.com/articles/yshoppingarticles/388/eau-no-the-strangest-scents-ever/

IceAlisa
07-04-2010, 07:22 AM
I was at a friend's house today who is a perfume junkie like me and we had a great old time going through her gigantic sample collection.

Her tastes run towards the classic fragrances--I saw samples of Hermes Caleche, Chanel No. 5.

And of course being true to myself, I fell in love with yet another Angel clone. :duh: This time it was Le Baiser Du Dragon by Cartier. It is so grown up and elegant that I can only picture a super sophisticated gown, sleek hair and heels to go with it. The patchouli is rather prominent as well as a strong impression of sandalwood which will prevent me from buying a bottle for myself.

Notes: top notes of amaretto accord, neroli blossom, and gardenia; a heart of iris, cedar, musk, and Bulgarian rose; and base of vetiver, patchouli, benzoin, and amber.

My friend also had a sample of Laila. It is exactly how I imagined it: very clean and straightforward. American almost, if I can say that without trying to offend. Dragon is very French to me, OTOH and Pink Sugar is very Italian (I am aware that Laila is not an American scent but that's just my impression, if scents had nationality).

So if you are a fan of patchouli and woody scents, Le Baiser du Dragon (Dragon's Kiss) is a rather sexy oriental that has a classic but not stuffy quality.

Didn't love Caleche, that was a bit too classic for me.

Prancer
07-04-2010, 09:42 AM
My friend also had a sample of Laila. It is exactly how I imagined it: very clean and straightforward. American almost, if I can say that without trying to offend. Dragon is very French to me, OTOH and Pink Sugar is very Italian (I am aware that Laila is not an American scent but that's just my impression, if scents had nationality).

:lol: I just read a long rant a couple of days ago on the subject of Americans and their obsession with clean scents and how it is ruining perfume.

The Norway house at DisneyWorld/EPCOT passes out free samples of Laila and it's very popular with Americans. I actually like the light, white floral of it, but that sharp watermelon is too much for me, even though it calms a bit during the dry down.

cruisin
07-04-2010, 03:38 PM
:lol: I just read a long rant a couple of days ago on the subject of Americans and their obsession with clean scents and how it is ruining perfume.

The Norway house at DisneyWorld/EPCOT passes out free samples of Laila and it's very popular with Americans. I actually like the light, white floral of it, but that sharp watermelon is too much for me, even though it calms a bit during the dry down.

Watermelon? Really? Never heard of the fragrance. Is is soft?

Twilight1
07-04-2010, 03:53 PM
I am CK type of girl, Obsession, Eternity and Escape in particular. But I also love fruity scents esp Cherry, Strawberry and Peach. As a teen I loved getting Dewberry (from the Body Shop). That was my favourite.

IceAlisa
07-04-2010, 05:45 PM
:lol: I just read a long rant a couple of days ago on the subject of Americans and their obsession with clean scents and how it is ruining perfume. Well, that's silly. It's not like the clean frags are killing other types of scents--that's been accomplished by the fruity florals. So it's the tweens and tweens-at-heart all around the world who are ruining perfume.


The Norway house at DisneyWorld/EPCOT passes out free samples of Laila and it's very popular with Americans. I actually like the light, white floral of it, but that sharp watermelon is too much for me, even though it calms a bit during the dry down.
It seemed pretty well behaved to me but perhaps the sample was old.

Prancer
07-04-2010, 08:13 PM
It seemed pretty well behaved to me but perhaps the sample was old.

I really dislike melon smells, so the watermelon in it leaps right out at me at first. Once it dries down, it's not too bad, but I can still smell it every now and then.

And why is watermelon in a perfume that is supposed to be the essence of Norway, anyway?


Watermelon? Really? Never heard of the fragrance. Is is soft?

It's a pretty clean and simple scent, very summery. It's also supposed to be a scent you can wear around people who have allergic reactions to perfume: http://www.essortment.com/all/perfumeallergy_rvtl.htm

IceAlisa
07-04-2010, 08:31 PM
I really dislike melon smells, so the watermelon in it leaps right out at me at first. Once it dries down, it's not too bad, but I can still smell it every now and then.

And why is watermelon in a perfume that is supposed to be the essence of Norway, anyway?
Weird, I didn't get watermelon at all. It was just a very clean, cold and very mild white floral. I agree that a watermelon note hardly belongs in a Scandinavian fragrance. Le shrug.