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orientalplane
12-23-2009, 05:24 PM
ex: when I was in college, I went to the clinic one day because of insomnia. I'd had it on and off since childhood. The nurse gave me all sorts of suggestions, hot baths, etc... but the doctor barely spoke to me and just prescribed a muscle relaxant and pushed me out the door. I decided to take her advice and never swallowed a single pill. Then I started running every day and *poof* insomnia gone for good. Daily exercise was all the stress relief I needed.

I'm glad this has worked for you. :)

Unfortunately, insomnia doesn't always respond well to exercise. The more exercise I take, the worse my insomnia becomes. I am pretty active at the moment and it's very bad; I think exercising energises me and leaves me less able to calm down.

Of course everyone's different.

orbitz
12-23-2009, 05:28 PM
Of course, I'm not famous, so chances are good that you won't be talking about me. :slinkaway

If you have something really outrageous in your home when you die then your death will make the news. If that happens then you betcha we'll talk about you ;) ... although most likely we won't know its 'skaternum' though.
(ok... this is kind of morbid)

mrr50
12-23-2009, 05:29 PM
DO NOT FLUSH UNUSED MEDICATIONS. Your local government officials do not want you to, nor the DNR nor your neighbors. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose. There are areas which actually are testing positive for medications.

Yes, I see others have brought this up but I'm all for reinforcement.

IceAlisa
12-23-2009, 05:51 PM
Is this some of what she was prescribed?

Some of what has reportedly found in her home. Whether they are all prescribed and to whom, I could not tell you.

This thread got me thinking about what the authorities would find if I ever died in my home -- and how those findings might be interpreted.

I practically have a pharmacy in my house. I've had 5 knee surgeries of various sorts (some quite nasty). My husband has arthritis and a couple of surgeries of his own, including a UPPP, and he takes a cocktail of antidepressants and stabilizers to keep his episodic depression under control. His last episode of depression was accompanied by anxiety and insomnia (not uncommon). We generally keep our unused medication around until it expires.

So if one of us dropped dead, the authorities would find a variety of hardcore pain killers, anti-depressants, sleep aids, anxiety medication, etc. If we were famous, what would you guys be saying about us? :eek: If all the Rx's are legitimately prescribed and neither one of you has a history of what has been called in Brittany's case "erratic behavior" and other indicators of Rx drug abuse, and especially if neither dies an untimely, medically unexplained death, I really don't see why this would be a problem. :confused:

talulabell
12-23-2009, 06:33 PM
This thread got me thinking about what the authorities would find if I ever died in my home -- and how those findings might be interpreted.

I practically have a pharmacy in my house. I've had 5 knee surgeries of various sorts (some quite nasty). My husband has arthritis and a couple of surgeries of his own, including a UPPP, and he takes a cocktail of antidepressants and stabilizers to keep his episodic depression under control. His last episode of depression was accompanied by anxiety and insomnia (not uncommon). We generally keep our unused medication around until it expires.

So if one of us dropped dead, the authorities would find a variety of hardcore pain killers, anti-depressants, sleep aids, anxiety medication, etc. If we were famous, what would you guys be saying about us? :eek:


Some of what has reportedly found in her home. Whether they are all prescribed and to whom, I could not tell you.
If all the Rx's are legitimately prescribed and neither one of you has a history of what has been called in Brittany's case "erratic behavior" and other indicators of Rx drug abuse, and especially if neither dies an untimely, medically unexplained death, I really don't see why this would be a problem. :confused:

Because TMZ would get hold of the info that the person was young (45), healthy, and died unexpectedly with a "large number of prescription pain killers on hand". Hell, they'd probably say you were surrounded by a plethora of pain killers, even if they were all in your bathroom medicine cabinet.

(this is, of course, going on the theory that TMZ would report on the untimely demise of skating board posters. :watch: )

It's an interesting point, because it just goes to show how many assumptions are made by the media in the first moments after something happens. Sure, sometimes they get things right, but when they dont, you never hear anything about correcting the stories.

berthesghost
12-23-2009, 07:33 PM
It's an interesting point, because it just goes to show how many assumptions are made by the media in the first moments after something happens. Sure, sometimes they get things right, but when they dont, you never hear anything about correcting the stories.I don't think they make assumptions. I think they report on the facts, and the facts they chose to report are geared toward generating interest in the story. Once the cause of death is found, they will report it, just as they have reported all of the other info released by the family and the government agencies.

cruisin
12-23-2009, 09:06 PM
Unused or expired medications (not just prescriptions) really should be returned to a pharmacy not just flushed. They dispose of them properly.


Please don't flush them! That will send them into the nearby waterways (endangering animals) and possibly back to the city water. Yes, wastewater is filtered, but the filters may not be set up to filter out these things, depending on the size they break down to.

When I got rid of my drugs after my neck surgery, the pharmacy was happy to take them back to dispose of them safely.


DO NOT FLUSH UNUSED MEDICATIONS. Your local government officials do not want you to, nor the DNR nor your neighbors. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose. There are areas which actually are testing positive for medications.

Yes, I see others have brought this up but I'm all for reinforcement.

You are all right! I didn't know I could bring them back. But flushing, clearly, is not the best solution :duh:! Thanks for pointing that out :). If it makes you feel better I've only done it twice, and won't again.

skaternum
12-23-2009, 09:09 PM
If all the Rx's are legitimately prescribed and neither one of you has a history of what has been called in Brittany's case "erratic behavior" ...

Have you ever seen me jacked up on Christmas cookies?! :lol: ETA: Or one of Sandra Lee's sugary cocktails!

skaternum
12-23-2009, 09:10 PM
I don't think they make assumptions.

No, they make insinuations, which is far worse IMO.

laurenjm
12-23-2009, 09:15 PM
The article does not say if all of the above named drugs were prescribed to her. It was originally stated that prescriptions were found in her name, her husband's name, and her mother's name.

There are quite a few psychiatric drugs, and doubles of types (though some do work differently). Ativan and Klonopin, both pretty strong anti-anxiety. Fluoxetine (Prozac) is the only designated anti-depressant, but Topamax is also prescribed for depression, OCD, bi-polar, psychosis, though it is actually an anti-seizure drug. Granted, it is not unusual to use anti-anxiety with anti-depressants for some psych disorders. Two forms of Vicodin. The Propranolol could indicate that there was some underlying heart/vascular issues, it lowers blood pressure (though that could be her mother's). If she was drinking with that drug cocktail, whew!

skaternum, I throw all pain meds away as soon as I am done with them. I don't like to take them, but I have had a lot of oral surgery lately. I will take one or two of the 20+ they give me and then flush them. You never know if one of your kid's friends might go looking for something in the medicine cabinet. But I'm neurotic and OCD, so....

Thanks, that's why I asked! I know that sometimes Doc's prescribe more than one psychotropic drug to treat a person, but I would suggest that these medications along with a probable anorexia disorder, diabetes which can cause a whole host of vascular disease and the probability that she mixed this with whatever could have lead to acute cardiac arrest and possibly pulmonary failure too.

Whatever it is, dying suddenly at 32 is not normal!

Lurking Skater
12-23-2009, 10:20 PM
To dispose of unused meds, you can crush them up and throw them in a plastic bag with coffee grounds, kitty litter or some other undesireable substance. Then close up the bag and toss them in the garbage. That's what every Pharmacist that I've worked with recommends.

slicekw
12-23-2009, 10:26 PM
Topamax is currently only labelled for seizures and migraines. It did a number on my brain, and I'm glad I'm off it (migraines). It's being used off-label for bipolar and depression and in some cocktails.

The presence of the Topamax along with the actual mood-related drugs (anxiety and depression) makes me wonder if she was being treated for bipolar or some other mood-related disease. Or -- Topamax is a serious anorectic. Easy enough to get it, and it's part of the new weight-loss concoction that is getting approved.

I used to have a friend that was on a cocktail for bipolar, it switched but often contained some of the drugs found in her house.

All I'm on right now is allergy meds and I'm thankful.

numbers123
12-23-2009, 11:31 PM
To dispose of unused meds, you can crush them up and throw them in a plastic bag with coffee grounds, kitty litter or some other undesireable substance. Then close up the bag and toss them in the garbage. That's what every Pharmacist that I've worked with recommends.

The safest way for me is to take them to the pharmacy. They will dispose of them for you.

I have a lot of medications in my cabinet. Some are current medications, some are medications that I do not discard because I use them on an occasional basis - migraine meds (I have several to go in a progression if one does not relieve it, Midrin A, reglan, pherngan, etc.), vertigo meds - starting with antivert and going forward if no relief, prevised for ulcer flareups, asthma medications, etc. Due to the high cost of medications, my physicians recommend that I keep them on hand.

If I should die unexpectedly, the doctor's records, my pharmacy records, etc. would identify which prescriptions I have and how many were dispensed.

I think that it is premature to speculate anything.

IceAlisa
12-23-2009, 11:40 PM
Have you ever seen me jacked up on Christmas cookies?! :lol: ETA: Or one of Sandra Lee's sugary cocktails!

:lol: No, but I will take your word for it.

Brittany was reported to lay down on the floor, with a napkin over her face during a junket because she reportedly was tired of people looking at her.

She was also "disruptive" on movie sets and was fired from her latest movie where she was supposedly "in and out of consciousness" and chaperoned by her husband.

Back to the meds: propanolol is a beta blocker that can be used for migraine prophylaxis. May be she had migraines considering the number of meds that treat them found.

Angelskates
12-24-2009, 12:25 AM
This thread got me thinking about what the authorities would find if I ever died in my home -- and how those findings might be interpreted.

I practically have a pharmacy in my house.

Me too.


To dispose of unused meds, you can crush them up and throw them in a plastic bag with coffee grounds, kitty litter or some other undesireable substance. Then close up the bag and toss them in the garbage. That's what every Pharmacist that I've worked with recommends.

Mine have also suggested looking for organisations that need medications for 3rd world countries. They'll either use them or throw them out safely.