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Lanie
11-23-2011, 05:38 PM
I'm going to make a blueberry pie today for tomorrow. Should I get it ready and not bake it, or bake it today then reheat it tomorrow? I've always made it the day of for Thanksgiving.

IceAlisa
11-23-2011, 05:40 PM
I made chicken noodle soup from scratch today and it was :swoon: . Perfect for a cold rainy day :)

Realized I forgot - does anyone add eggshells when making stock? Our discussion upthread got me interested in stock recipes and I saw that a bunch of people swear by eggshells for extra calcium. I might try that next time... not that I'll really be able to tell the difference :lol:

Just add chicken bones (or beef if it's beef stock).

skatesindreams
11-23-2011, 06:16 PM
The eggshells also help to clarify the stock

Stefanie
11-23-2011, 06:35 PM
And can you give the recipe for the white choc pumpkin cookies? Those sound delicious!


2 1/4 cups flour
1 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. baking soda
1 tsp. ground cinnamon
2 tsp. pumpkin pie spice (I make my own because I already have the spices)
1/2 tsp. salt
1 stick of butter, softened
1 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 cup Pumpkin Puree (I used the stuff in the can)
1 egg
1 tsp. vanilla extract
1 1/2 cup white chocolate chips

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Whisk the dry ingredients and set aside. Cream the butter and sugars. Add the pumpkin, egg, and vanilla and combine thoroughly. Slowly add the dry ingredients (I usually add it in thirds so as not to make a mess). Stir in the white chocolate chips. Drop spoonfuls of dough onto cookie sheet lined with parchment paper. Bake 10-12 minutes.

You may find the amount of white chocolate chips to make the cookie too rich. I didn't, but I'm a big fan of white chocolate. :) Enjoy!

Jenny
11-23-2011, 07:07 PM
Several people in another thread asked for this recipe to be posted here - an easy, delicious pie crust:

There’s a ton of butter in this – but it’s the holidays, no? But almost zero sugar, and if you let your fruit’s own natural sweetness shine through, you need no more than a teaspoon in the filling.

Flaky Pie Dough – makes enough for two open pies, or one double crust

2 ½ cups flour
2 tsp salt (seems like a lot to me, so I use half this amount)
½ tsp sugar
1 cup (two sticks) unsalted butter, chilled in the freezer for a few minutes before using
¼ - ¾ cup ice water

Before beginning, place a mixing bowl, plate and box grater in the fridge until they are nice and cold, along with the water.
Add dry ingredients to the cold mixing bowl, and then wash your hands in cold water and bring out the cold ingredients and utensils.
Using the box grater on the cold plate, grate the cold butter and then add to flour mixture. Toss with hands lightly to coat all the pieces of butter, like it’s a salad.
Gradually add ice water and knead the dough until it comes together. You may not need all the ice water.
Divide the dough in two, and form them into flat discs (easier to roll later). Wrap in plastic or pop into a ziploc, squeezing out the air before sealing, and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes and as long as a day or two before using.
Then proceed as per recipe.


For apple pie, I assemble the pie with raw dough with slits in the top to let out steam and a brush of cream and very light dusting of sugar. Bake at 375 for 50-55 minutes.

(For the apple filling, I use spartans, about 4-5 of them with no skins, with a bit of fresh lemon juice, a teaspoon of sugar and about a tablespoon of flour to thicken it. The only spice I use is a Middle Eastern blend called baharat that I order from thespicehouse.com. It smells like Christmas, but is actually quite spicy, made from black pepper, coriander, cumin, cloves, cinnamon, cardamom, paprika and Chinese chile peppers. Sounds odd but I get raves for it every time! You could easily use standard apple pie seasoning of course, or even just cinnamon.)

BittyBug
11-23-2011, 07:36 PM
Jenny - you've mentioned this technique before and I find it quite intriguing, but which side / setting of the box grater do you use? Mine has 4 sides, each leading to different sized shreds. Most recipes usually say "pea-sized" chunks, but the lady on the NY Times just did a video on pie crust and she said "lima bean" sized chunks, so I'm curious what sized butter chunk you target.

JAF
11-23-2011, 07:41 PM
I just made a pie crust using vodka/water recipe, it's suppose to make rolling out easier and a more flaky crust.

Dough is in the fridge resting now, so have to let you know the results later.

Anyone make this pie crust recipe?

BittyBug
11-23-2011, 07:47 PM
Does the vodka go in the crust or the chef? ;)

JAF
11-23-2011, 07:56 PM
Does the vodka go in the crust or the chef? ;)
In the crust :) and since I take medication I don't drink at all. :P
Reviews say the best crust ever - we shall see.

Here is the recipe:
Pie Crust Vodka
2 1/2 cups (12 1/2 ounces) unbleached all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon table salt
2 tablespoons sugar
12 tablespoons (1 1/2 sticks) cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/4-inch slices
1/2 cup cold vegetable shortening, cut into 4 pieces
1/4 cup cold vodka
1/4 cup cold water

1. Process 1 1/2 cups flour, salt, and sugar in food processor until combined, about 2 one-second pulses. Add butter and shortening and process until homogeneous dough just starts to collect in uneven clumps, about 15 seconds (dough will resemble cottage cheese curds and there should be no uncoated flour). Scrape bowl with rubber spatula and redistribute dough evenly around processor blade. Add remaining cup flour and pulse until mixture is evenly distributed around bowl and mass of dough has been broken up, 4 to 6 quick pulses. Empty mixture into medium bowl.
2. 2
Sprinkle vodka and water over mixture. With rubber spatula, use folding motion to mix, pressing down on dough until dough is slightly tacky and sticks together. Divide dough into two even balls and flatten each into 4-inch disk. Wrap each in plastic wrap and refrigerate at least 45 minutes or up to 2 days.

Jenny
11-23-2011, 08:02 PM
Jenny - you've mentioned this technique before and I find it quite intriguing, but which side / setting of the box grater do you use? Mine has 4 sides, each leading to different sized shreds. Most recipes usually say "pea-sized" chunks, but the lady on the NY Times just did a video on pie crust and she said "lima bean" sized chunks, so I'm curious what sized butter chunk you target.

I use the large holed side, so you end up with thick shreds about a half inch long. Sorta like squished out peas :)

I just find it really easy to do, and you don't need to over work the dough as I always found using forks or a pastry cutter, which tended to blend the butter into the flour too much. It's the pockets of butter that make the crust flaky - and this one is super flaky.

Love the vodka idea though, but am :scream: about shortening. Wonder if it would work with the butter version? There's always a bottle of vodka in the freezer any way :shuffle: so I think I might try that next.

The other thing I've done for savoury pies is add some herb or spice like fresh thyme or cayenne pepper to it. Colourful, and tasty :)

BittyBug
11-23-2011, 10:05 PM
In the crust :) and since I take medication I don't drink at all. :P
Thanks. Please let us know how it comes out.


I use the large holed side, so you end up with thick shreds about a half inch long. Sorta like squished out peas :)Excellent. I am going to try it. :)

Habs
11-23-2011, 10:25 PM
I use the large holed side, so you end up with thick shreds about a half inch long. Sorta like squished out peas :)



I tried this technique when Jenny mentioned it awhile ago, and it is brilliant. :kickass:

JAF
11-23-2011, 11:30 PM
I just made a pie crust using vodka/water recipe, it's suppose to make rolling out easier and a more flaky crust.

Dough is in the fridge resting now, so have to let you know the results later.

I made little pie crust squares topped with sugar and cinnamon to use as an example so I could report back to FSU (the sacrifices I make for FSU ;) ).

The pie crust is super yummy - so flaky and short. When some of the sugar caramelized on the squares you have crunchy, flaky and short all at once - what a taste, texture combination. My daughter had stopped in and I ask her to try one, she said forget the pies makes these.

Well, I'm going to make pies, I will have to report on crust in a pie after turkey day since it's hard to explain a slice out of each pie.

As for rolling out the dough - rolled between two sheets of wax paper - no problem. It seemed the dough wanted to stick to the wax paper but it didn't.
Maybe the next time I will try without paper.

Rex
11-23-2011, 11:43 PM
The new 1st class petty officer in the galley today made a crab and asparagus bisque that was one of the best soups I've tasted there. Really amazing. He has been thinking outside the box and has brought some really fine recipes to the command.

BittyBug
11-24-2011, 12:04 AM
I made little pie crust squares topped with sugar and cinnamon to use as an example so I could report back to FSU (the sacrifices I make for FSU ;) )........My daughter had stopped in and I ask her to try one, she said forget the pies makes these.Would you mind making them for us, too, please? :saint: Sounds divine.

I just lifted Jenny's box grater butter method for a crumb topping I'm making. Obviously that's not supposed to be flaky, but I thought it might make it easier to cut in the butter, and indeed it did. :)

FSU rocks! :respec: