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michiruwater
09-27-2011, 01:35 AM
I really love using parchment paper. Pick an assortment of veggies you enjoy, put them in the center of parchment paper, season with any herbs, salt, pepper, etc., and then fold up (bring up the long sides and roll down to the vegetables, then fold under the parts that aren't enclosed) and bake at 350 for 10 minutes or so until warm and crisp. Delicious. You can throw a salmon filet in there on top of the veggies and cook it the same way as well. It all just steams inside the bag.

Jenny
09-27-2011, 02:37 PM
I have turned into a HUGE zucchini fan. We use it in tons of things. Last night we had a spaghetti sauce we made with lots of eggplant and seasonings and we grilled some chicken tenders to add to it. Instead of making pasta we took a zucchini and cut it into very long thin strips to mimic pasta. We just heated that in the microwave for 3-4 minutes in some chicken broth until it wasn't so raw. Then we put the "noodles" down and topped it with our spaghetti sauce. It was delicious. Much more flavorful than pasta but works the same way in your mouth. Delicious and healthy.

This sounds fabulous!


salt (maybe not if your doctor said watch the sodium),

The major sources of salt tend to be processed and fast foods - Big Macs, potato chips, canned soups, even things that you don't consider salty are full of salt. If you are making most of your meals, adding a bit of salt while cooking or at the table shouldn't have a detrimental effect.

If you like eggplant, this recipe caught my eye in Food & Wine this month: Speedy Ratatouille with Goat Cheese. (http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/speedy-ratatouille-with-goat-cheese) You could easily leave the lemon out I think.

Might be worth picking up a couple of new cookbooks too - Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall (who is all about "real" food) just came out with River Cottage Veg Everyday, and an even better choice if you just want one might be Mark Bittman's Food Matters Cookbook (not Food Matters with a few recipes, but the newer version that is all recipes). What I like about Bittman, other than his very sensible approach to food, is that his recipes always include alternate ideas so that you can mix and match your favourite flavours and easily expand your repertoire.

My favourite quickie veg dish is to cut up any mix of zucchini, yellow squash, peppers, onions and cherry tomatoes into chunks, dress with olive oil, hot pepper flakes and s&p, then roast in the oven at 400 for about half an hour or until the tomatoes split. Then toss in fresh herbs - parsley, basil, whatever you like. Good on its own, topped with fresh romano, tossed into a pasta, eaten the next day as a stew or base for a soup.

One of our favourite sandwiches is sort of an Italian sub - we saute or bbq peppers and onions (with hot peppers or red pepper flakes if you like) and then put that on ciabatta with a layer of chopped fresh herbs (basil, parsley, oregano, thyme, rosemary - whatever you like but it should be fresh to form almost a lettuce layer), and provolone cheese. Hubby also adds sauteed mushrooms to his, and I will sometimes add a layer of fresh sliced tomatoes. Dress with your best olive oil.

mkats
09-28-2011, 12:20 AM
Ooh, that ratatouille looks fabulous!

What are y'all's favorite food magazines? Boyfriend got me a subscription to the Food Network magazine and I love it - nothing too fancy or special, but I get some good ideas and fun things to try out of it every month. (Except this month. I hate pumpkin and so does Boyfriend, so we're out :lol: ) We get a subscription to Bon Appetit at work and it's always fun to read through: everything's :swoon: but the recipes are usually way more complicated - anything more than 2-3 hours of prep time is too much time and work for me, unfortunately.

BigB08822
09-28-2011, 12:36 AM
Another veggie dish we are doing tonight. Stuffed tomatoes. We hollowed out a tomato and in a sautee pan we cooked a little bacon, onions and garlic. Then we threw in some spinach until it wilted nicely and took it off the heat while we melted in a handful of mozzarella cheese. It is a little fattening but 3 tomatoes has only 2 pieces of bacon total and less than half a cup of cheese so I don't think it is so bad per serving. We are roasting these in the oven with some asparagus and serving it along side some grilled chicken tenders in an alfredo sauce.

Artemis@BC
09-28-2011, 12:44 AM
What I had last night to use some new crop yams: yam salad. Cubes of cold, cooked yams/sweet potatoes, tossed with a little olive oil and some balsamic. Mix in some crumbled chèvre, some diced sundried tomato, some roasted garlic, some caramalized onion, and some toasted walnuts or pinenuts .... deeelish!

Jenny
09-28-2011, 02:57 PM
Ooh, that ratatouille looks fabulous!

What are y'all's favorite food magazines?

I love Food & Wine - can be a little daunting for newer cooks, but the recipes are solid. They're current without being overly trendy.

Saveur is good if you like to read about food - histories, regions, personal memories etc. Good recipes too, but again with ingredients and techniques that may be challenging.

Bon Appetit got a new editor in the spring, and after some initial missteps, they seem to be settling in. Probably the most accessible of the three.

For easy, inexpensive recipes, Taste of Home is great. Sometimes relies to heavily on processed or premade ingredients, but they always work.

Mark Bittman has a really good regular column in the Sunday New York Times magazine that's definitely worth looking - I think it's online too.

Stefanie
09-28-2011, 03:00 PM
I made chicken pot pie for the first time last night and can't figure out why the filling was kind of soupy when it came out of the oven. Maybe I didn't give it enough time on the stove after I added the cream. Or perhaps I need to add more flour than the recipe called for. It tasted great, though.

Stefanie
09-28-2011, 03:03 PM
What are y'all's favorite food magazines?

I subscribe to Cooking Light have made a few of the recipes from there, mainly their salads as they always have good ideas. My coworker passes on his old copies of Cook's Illustrated, and I haven't actually made anything from there but I love reading the articles.

Jenny
10-07-2011, 02:17 PM
If you like eggplant, this recipe caught my eye in Food & Wine this month: Speedy Ratatouille with Goat Cheese. (http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/speedy-ratatouille-with-goat-cheese) You could easily leave the lemon out I think.

Bumping up this thread as I finally got around to trying this recipe last night - it was fabulous!

It takes a bit of time as you cook the veggies in three batches before combining, but if you cut everything up ahead, you've got only 30 mins at the stove and you can multi-task while cooking. Hubby doesn't like goat cheese so he had fresh parmesan, but I thought the goat cheese was perfect.

Great vegetarian recipe; vegan if you don't top with cheese.

emason
10-07-2011, 05:14 PM
I subscribe to Cooking Light have made a few of the recipes from there, mainly their salads as they always have good ideas. My coworker passes on his old copies of Cook's Illustrated, and I haven't actually made anything from there but I love reading the articles.

The one and only time I have ever made pot roast, I used a Cook's Illustrated recipe and it was perfect; it totally erased all memories of the dried out, over-cooked pot roast my grandmother used to make.

Artemis@BC
10-07-2011, 05:17 PM
Our family Thanksgiving has been postponed til the end of the month, so I have a bit of a reprive from trying to come up with something for me (vegetarian) and my cousin (vegan) to eat. I'm bored with tofurky, and I've done more variations on nut loaf and stuffed squash than I can count.

Any brilliant ideas? It's not like I don't cook vegetarian all the time, but I like to do something that "goes with" everyone else's bird & trimmings.

There are a million web sites with ideas, but am looking for something tried & true.

TIA

Vash01
10-07-2011, 05:31 PM
I am not a vegan (I am a vegetarian) but I am wondering if there are any easy vegan cake recipes? Last month I was looking to order a vegan cake for a coworker who was retiring, but had a hard time finding a bakery that could make it. I heard that one that makes it is very expensive. I am not much of a cook, and I rarely bake, but if there is something easy, I might try making it.

Artemis@BC
10-07-2011, 05:48 PM
^ Cake is pretty easy to make vegan as even "regular" recipes don't need eggs or dairy. I've made some of the cakes in the How It All Vegan series of cookbooks, and they've all been delicious. This recipe (http://www.instructables.com/id/The-BEST-chococlate-cake-ever...that-happens-to-be/) is very similar to one of those. It's the vinegar that makes it light & fluffy.

Jenny
10-07-2011, 06:00 PM
The one and only time I have ever made pot roast, I used a Cook's Illustrated recipe and it was perfect; it totally erased all memories of the dried out, over-cooked pot roast my grandmother used to make.

The key to roast beef or roast anything is a meat thermometer - no guessing on doneness, perfect every time.


Our family Thanksgiving has been postponed til the end of the month, so I have a bit of a reprive from trying to come up with something for me (vegetarian) and my cousin (vegan) to eat. I'm bored with tofurky, and I've done more variations on nut loaf and stuffed squash than I can count.

Any brilliant ideas? It's not like I don't cook vegetarian all the time, but I like to do something that "goes with" everyone else's bird & trimmings.

This is a version of a wonderful recipe from Balthazar restaurant in New York, which also appears in their cookbook in slightly more complicated form. Hubby has made this a dozen or more times - goes with turkey, and many other roasts and braises too. Nice colourful look on the table and plate. Even people who claim to dislike some of these veggies gobble (!) it up. It's vegetarian, but you could easily leave out the butter and make it vegan.

Pan Roasted Root Vegetables

1/4 cup olive oil
3 garlic cloves, crushed, skins removed
1 celery root, peeled and diced small
2 medium carrots, peeled and diced small
2 parsnips, peeled and diced small
2 sprigs of thyme
2 tablespoons of unsalted butter
1/2 teaspoon of salt
1/4 teaspoon of black pepper
2 tablespoons chopped flat leaf parsley

Heat the olive oil in a large skillet over a medium flame. Add the crushed garlic cloves and saute for 2 minutes, until the cloves just start to take on color. Add the diced vegetables and thyme and cook over high heat, stirring frequently with a spatula, for 5 minutes. Lower the flame and continue to cook, still stirring frequently, for another 10 minutes. Add a splash of water midway through the cooking time to provide some steam. Just before the end of the cooking time, add the butter. Season with salt and pepper and stir in parsley. The vegetables should be tender.

Vagabond
10-07-2011, 06:02 PM
Our family Thanksgiving has been postponed til the end of the month, so I have a bit of a reprive from trying to come up with something for me (vegetarian) and my cousin (vegan) to eat. I'm bored with tofurky, and I've done more variations on nut loaf and stuffed squash than I can count.

Any brilliant ideas? It's not like I don't cook vegetarian all the time, but I like to do something that "goes with" everyone else's bird & trimmings.

There are a million web sites with ideas, but am looking for something tried & true.

TIA

Have you considered making a soup? It's something everyone can share as a starter, and your cousin and you can turn it into your main course.

Here's a link to some vegan recipes from France that are great for this time of year, including an apple-parsnip soup that is delicious. http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/11/08/joan-nathans-french-inspired-thanksgiving/?scp=3&sq=joan%20nathan&st=cse

(I recommend substituting a quince for one of the apples if you can find quinces in your local markets.)