PDA

View Full Version : Recipes thread (continued)



Pages : 1 2 3 4 5 [6] 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67

emason
10-20-2009, 02:58 PM
The recipe I'm using has a genius way to handle the butter - as you know it must be very cold, and then worked into the dry ingredients quickly.

This recipe suggests that you use a box grater to grate the cold butter into pea-sized pieces, quickly toss it in the flour like a salad, and then easily turn it into a dough because the pieces are so small, without overworking it. For good measure, I've been putting the box grater in the fridge to cool it down before I use it.

Works like a charm, and both times the crust has come up really flaky - and I'm a novice at best!

This sounds like a great idea; I'm going to give it a try the next time I make a pie.

JILEN
10-20-2009, 03:19 PM
Thanks Jenny. Sounds like a great tip. I can't accomplish a flaky dough no matter how hard I try so I shall give your technique a try.

Last night was my first try at "Chicken Francese". I can't even pronounce this dish (somebody help me out :))but Shabarros got me hook I always eat it from their menu...so last night I googled and it turned out it wasnt so hard to make at all. My slightly fried chicken breast looked and tasted great. My lemon butter sauce even without the wine was a hit, only thing is I did not make enough to smother the pasta noodles that I cooked to go along with the chicken.

Jenny
10-20-2009, 03:59 PM
Gotta give credit where credit is due - the pastry recipe (and my new pizza dough recipe) is from Earth to Table by Jeff Crump and Bettina Schormann: http://www.amazon.com/Earth-Table-Seasonal-Recipes-Organic/dp/0061825948/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1256050575&sr=8-1

Which, btw, is a gorgeous book focused on local, seasonal eating but not in a slam it down your throat way. The authors are based at a country restaurant in Ontario, so it's a nice change for those of us who do not have the benefit of living in the bounty that is California :)

Highly recommended.

Jodi
10-20-2009, 09:19 PM
I find pie crust to be harder to make than yeast bread, or maybe more nervewracking.
Most definitely! Pastry is the only thing in baking that I'm really not good at or keen on. Someone told me once it's down to whether you have a tendency to warm or cool hands - makes sense to me, and people do always say "Ooh, you're so warm!" if they touch my hand :lol:

Choux pastry is another matter, of course :D I'd heard it spoken about with such mystery and yet it was a great success the first time I tried it, I found it dead easy. But a basic half fat to flour and water to mix pastry? It's the only thing I bake where it sometimes comes out such that the best thing that can be said for it is "edible." :/

The sainted Delia (though I don't actually like her myself) suggests the grating method, she puts the butter in the freezer for a while first. I have thought about trying it but I have such a history of grater injuries that I cringe and ball my fingers into protective fists at the thought of it :yikes: I have done pastry by sticking the butter and flour into a food processor until the butter's chopped up before, with results no different to rubbing it in by hand, but without the finger cramping at least.

Nigella Lawson's easy Danish pastry *did* work really well for me - back to the yeasted doughs again! I made a version as the flaky pastry for sausage rolls last Christmas, replacing half the butter with lard and the milk with water, and that was amazing :swoon:

emason
10-20-2009, 09:29 PM
Pastry is the only thing in baking that I'm really not good at or keen on.

Everyone in my family has a sweet tooth, and when I was a child my mother an I were constantly in the kitchen making something sweet: fudge, brownies, eclairs, cookies, cakes, etc.

However, my mother could never make a pie crust; she just couldn't get it. As a result, she developed a repertoire of pies that used graham cracker or cookies crust. Mom could turn out a chocolate pudding pie or Brandy Alexander pie or Grasshopper pie at the drop of a hat.

I can make a decent pie crust, but my specialty is baking powder biscuits, which is a different technique altogether. I think sometimes we can be good at one thing and just not get the other.

bobalina77
10-20-2009, 09:37 PM
Mmmm Grasshopper pie :swoon:

Maybe I'd be okay at making pastry cause unlike Jodi people usually tell me "OMG your hands are so COLD!". All this time I thought it was a curse :lol:

Jenny
10-21-2009, 01:59 PM
Everyone in my family has a sweet tooth, and when I was a child my mother an I were constantly in the kitchen making something sweet: fudge, brownies, eclairs, cookies, cakes, etc.

My first memories of cooking are baking too - much more kid friendly than making veggies I guess :)

I used to help with the Christmas cookies every year, and then we'd have a decorating party with another family featuring a messy table full of coloured icings and sprinkles, lots of fun.

In second grade, we made butter (which I have never done again - must try that), and something we called bonbons. For years, I had a stained recipe for it and we made them on sleepovers, but we lost it long ago. It had both icing sugar and corn syrup :eek: and you kneaded the mixture by hand, adding flavouring and food colouring for different kinds.

The first non-sweet thing I made was the meatloaf from the old Betty Crocker Recipe Card File (anyone remember that?) - it's the recipe I still use.

Jenny
10-23-2009, 03:35 PM
Friday night is casual dinner night in our house, and that often means sandwiches. Tonight I will be attempting banh mi for the first time.

My Spice House order arrived the other day - it was like Christmas unwrapping each new item, including my spanking new microplane :rollin: New favourite condiment: Vulcan's Fire Salt.

Aimless
10-23-2009, 07:49 PM
Cooks Illustrated made a breakthrough when they came up with a recipe that substitutes vodka for part of the water. The vodka adds moisture and keeps the dough easy to handle but does not toughen like water does. The alcohol will bake away in the oven. And the two-step addition of the flour ensures flakiness. I've had excellent results with it.

Ingredients
2 1/2 cups (12 1/2 ounces) unbleached all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon table salt
2 tablespoons sugar
12 tablespoons (1 1/2 sticks) cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/4-inch slices
1/2 cup cold vegetable shortening, cut into 4 pieces
1/4 cup cold vodka
1/4 cup cold water
Procedure
1. Process 1 1/2 cups flour, salt, and sugar in food processor until combined, about 2 one-second pulses. Add butter and shortening and process until homogeneous dough just starts to collect in uneven clumps, about 15 seconds (dough will resemble cottage cheese curds and there should be no uncoated flour). Scrape bowl with rubber spatula and redistribute dough evenly around processor blade. Add remaining cup flour and pulse until mixture is evenly distributed around bowl and mass of dough has been broken up, 4 to 6 quick pulses. Empty mixture into medium bowl.
2. Sprinkle vodka and water over mixture. With rubber spatula, use folding motion to mix, pressing down on dough until dough is slightly tacky and sticks together. Divide dough into two even balls and flatten each into 4-inch disk. Wrap each in plastic wrap and refrigerate at least 45 minutes or up to 2 days.

Jenny
10-23-2009, 08:42 PM
Seriously?? Sounds like my kinda bread!

Question for bakers: butter vs shortening vs lard - thoughts?

Prancer
10-25-2009, 09:02 PM
Since so many people are sick or know someone who is, I thought I would post this very easy recipe for chicken soup for cold and allergy sufferers. It's full of vitamins C and A, and the ginger helps clear the nose.

If you don't like ginger or lime, you won't like this. You can really taste them both. My husband loves this when he has a bad cold, though, because he CAN taste them both.

Gingeriffic Chicken Soup

2 quarts chicken broth
About 1.5 pounds boneless, skinless chicken cut into bite-sized pieces
1 pound baby red potatoes, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
2 cups baby carrots, cut in chunks
4 oz. fresh shitake mushrooms or 1 oz dried shitakes, rinsed and chopped
Zest and juice of one lime
2-in piece of ginger, peeled and thinly sliced
1 tsp. salt.
1 tsp. freshly ground black pepper

Put all ingredients in a large soup pot. Simmer over medium-low heat with a lid slightly ajar for about 40 minutes or until the chicken is cooked through.

This soup freezes well, or so the recipe says.

Rex
10-25-2009, 09:08 PM
What exactly ARE the healing properties in chicken soup? I have heard several different theories. Is it the spices? Is it the actual marrow from the bone in the chicken....is that true?

Prancer
10-25-2009, 09:15 PM
What exactly ARE the healing properties in chicken soup? I have heard several different theories. Is it the spices? Is it the actual marrow from the bone in the chicken....is that true?

Well, there's this:

http://archives.cnn.com/2000/HEALTH/diet.fitness/10/17/chicken.soup.reut/

BrokenAnkle
10-25-2009, 10:42 PM
Seriously?? Sounds like my kinda bread!

Question for bakers: butter vs shortening vs lard - thoughts?

I think the recipe with vodka refers to pie crust, not bread.

I always use butter myself, I think it has the best flavor.

Jenny
10-26-2009, 12:51 PM
Since so many people are sick or know someone who is, I thought I would post this very easy recipe for chicken soup for cold and allergy sufferers. It's full of vitamins C and A, and the ginger helps clear the nose.



Thanks Prancer for sharing this - never thought of ginger and lime in chicken soup, and it sounds like just the thing.

Will file in case needed this season.