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Jenny
07-05-2010, 02:37 PM
I found an easier way! I have one of those rotary cheese graters they have at restaurants where you put the cheese in and turn a handle and the cheese comes out the side (like this (http://www.amazon.com/Zyliss-Classic-Rotary-Cheese-Grater/dp/B000FDZJG2)).. works like a hot damn! Make sure you get one that comes apart though because it still gets stuck in the grater part. I think it's because the warmth of your hand isn't softening it as you're grating.

I have one of these for parmesan and romano - will try!



We went on vacation last week, while there I bought some salsa from a Mexican restaurant because it was so good. It was sold by the jar. I assumed it was jarred and sealed but it turns out they just scooped some into a jar and put on the lid. It was not sealed air tight.


Salsa can definitely go bad - the way to test is to dab a tiny bit on your tongue, and if it's tingly, it's bad. To be safe, you might want to toss it anyway and instead concentrate on figuring out what made it so good.

We have a really good fresh brand around here (sold in the refrigerator section) but too often it was bad before its due date, so we just started making our own with ripe tomatoes, bit of salt to get the juices going, bit of onion, hot pepper to taste, squeeze of lime, and cilantro. Tiny bit of garlic powder optional. If you experiment a little I'm sure you can come up with your own version that's better than anything you can buy. :)

re miso soup - this is something we want to try as it's apparently so good for you, and we've had it in restaurants. We bought some organic white miso, but I confess we are still a bit hesitant on the dashi and sea vegetables (baby steps!) so the plan is to make it with mushrooms, spinach and green onions to start, and see if we like it. We're not big on tofu either, but if we like the soup, will try sea vegetables. (We are fortunate in our city to have access to just about any ethnic ingredients you can name - including a chain of very large Asian markets.)

Other thoughts welcome!

BigB08822
07-05-2010, 04:10 PM
Thanks for the advice, I am just going to throw it out. I wish they had told me it wasn't sealed, we had a fridge in the room but I didn't think it was necessary. I have made my own salsa before and love it. I just really liked theirs, I never think my stuff is as good as other's.

mkats
07-18-2010, 08:16 PM
Does anyone have some great eggplant recipes to share? My eggplants are coming in quickly and we are getting tired of the one and only eggplant recipe this family seems to know :drama:

LordCirque
07-18-2010, 08:18 PM
I have discovered my Food Porn, from the Pastry Chef at Eric Riperts, Le Bernadin

http://michaellaiskonis.typepad.com/

http://mlaiskonis.typepad.com/workbook/

Holley Calmes
07-18-2010, 10:02 PM
Does anyone have some great eggplant recipes to share? My eggplants are coming in quickly and we are getting tired of the one and only eggplant recipe this family seems to know :drama:

If you like Indian.....peel and chop a medium eggplant into 1" pieces and soak in salt water for 30 minutes to remove the bitter taste (if it's really fresh, you might be ok. If the seeds look at all dark, soak!)

Chop a medium onion, garlic to taste, and a hot pepper-jalapeno, serrano etc...whatever you can handle heat-wise. Saute these in 2 tblsp olive oil until begining to carmelize. Then add your eggplant and a couple of peeled chopped tomatoes. Cook until well blended and the eggplant is soft. Then add a 1/2 can of unsweetened coconut milk and a tablespoon of curry powder. If you have some garam masala, add a teaspoon or so of that too. And, if you wanted to use sweetened coconut milk....go for it!

Of course you can always dip eggplant medalions in egg wash and breadcrumbs and saute in butter. I eat these with sour cream/dill sauce, but you can also use them for the basis of an eggplant lasagne.

Now I need a recipe.....anybody got a good tomato pie recipe? I haven't ;looked upthread, so forgive if I'm being repetitive, but I have a longing to make something tomatoey and cheesey and fattening.

Thanks for the coconut cream pie, Prancer. That's going to happen this week at my house! Yum!

Ajax
07-19-2010, 01:34 AM
Now I need a recipe.....anybody got a good tomato pie recipe? I haven't ;looked upthread, so forgive if I'm being repetitive, but I have a longing to make something tomatoey and cheesey and fattening.


Ask and you shall receive :) I haven't tried this recipe yet but I've made other ones from this food blogger and they always turn out great so I feel pretty comfortable recommending it:
http://www.davidlebovitz.com/archives/2010/05/french_tomato_tart_recipe.html

Japanfan
07-19-2010, 09:07 AM
Two experiments at plank grilled fish on the charcoal BBQ have been disappointing. My goal is to make a fabulous salmon dinner when my niece and her hubby visit in a couple of weeks.

The mistake is probably that I didn't want to fork out the $$ for wild sockeye so instead bought a rainbow trout (experiment #1) that was probably farmed and frozen/defrosted. The second experiment was with frozen/defrosted salmon fillets that Mr. Japanfan got on sale - they are good when breaded and pan fried but plank grilling was less satisfactory.

Tomorrow I'm going to try the plank grilling with fresh wild sockeye fillets. But I am yet to be convinced that the currently trendy plank grilling method. The whole fish had a steamed rather than charcoal flavour although it was certainly had a smoke taste the day after cooking (but was still not very good, quite bland..

In fact, I'm wondering if the plank method is not much more than a marketing gambit. I did a whole salmon stuffed with wild rice and bacon on the electric grill once and it was fabulous. Basically I'm not sure that the plank is any improvement over typical barbequed fish.

And I'm wondering if it actually better to leave the lid on the charcoal BBQ up, to avoid the steaming effect.

Ajax
07-19-2010, 02:51 PM
I don't like the plank grilling method at all. The change in flavor is not enough to justify purchasing the plank and soaking it for hours. If you want to grill salmon, brush the flesh with some dijon mustard and just put the filet directly on the oiled grill grate, skin-side down, over high heat. This will make the skin deliciously crispy. After a few minutes, flip it over and cook a bit more til it's done. Not too sure about timings but the whole thing shouldn't take more than 10 minutes.

emason
07-19-2010, 05:31 PM
Does anyone have some great eggplant recipes to share? My eggplants are coming in quickly and we are getting tired of the one and only eggplant recipe this family seems to know :drama:

Well, if your one family recipe IS NOT ratatouille, then go for that. It's not difficult to make, you get to use up your bumper crop of zucchini at the time, and there are dozens of recipes for it. I use one from one of the Silver Palate cookbooks myself.

pat c
07-19-2010, 06:47 PM
I've never bought the plank to bbq salmon on. This is what I do, I put tinfoil down on the grill (I punch holes in it so that steam doesn't gather under it, sprinkle the salmon with olive oil or butter, sea salt, lemon juice and drill. And I put the lid down for the beginning, take it off at the end. But everyone does this a little bit different. Experiment until you get it the way you want. That's usually the best way to find out how you like things. :)


I've also just wrapped the salmon in tinfoil and use the above ingredients. I just keep turning it so it doesn't dry out on one side.

mkats
07-20-2010, 01:27 AM
Well, it your one family recipe IS NOT ratatouille, then go for that. It's not difficult to make, you get to use up your bumper crop of zucchini at the time, and there are dozens of recipes for it. I use one from one of the Silver Palate cookbooks myself.

OMG :swoon: great idea!! in googling for ratatouille, I found this: :swoon:

http://smittenkitchen.com/2007/07/rat-a-too-ee-for-you-ee/

succubus
07-20-2010, 03:02 AM
Coconut Cream Pie for Coconut Cream Pie Lovers



I am going to make this. And then I am going to eat it. And then I am going to become your slave. :swoon:

Prancer
07-20-2010, 06:27 AM
I am going to make this. And then I am going to eat it. And then I am going to become your slave. :swoon:

You might want to actually try it before submitting yourself to my eville dominion.

Christina
08-06-2010, 02:35 AM
My coworker brought in a coconut cake about two months ago. It was fabulous. It was very moist, almost like she poured something over the cake part, with fluffy white icing and coconut on it. :encore: His sister-in-law made it. She won't give up the recipe. I've tried to entice her with homemade pickles (they're yummy) but no dice.

Any recipes out there? I made one recently that called for coconut in the cake, but this one didn't have that. It was sooooo good, it has to have about a jillion calories per slice.

acraven
08-06-2010, 06:08 AM
My coworker brought in a coconut cake about two months ago. It was fabulous. It was very moist, almost like she poured something over the cake part, with fluffy white icing and coconut on it...
Any recipes out there?

The moistness was probably the result of sprinkling coconut milk over the cake layers after baking. I know my (southern) grandmother did that, and her coconut cake was fabulous. I foolishly never asked for her recipe, but I bet you can find something online that includes coconut milk. I'm pretty sure my grandmother used fresh coconut milk (personally, I've never figured out how to get it out of the coconut). I know she used a traditional boiled (7-minute) frosting. Shouldn't be a problem to find the latter online.