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altai_rose
02-09-2010, 03:18 PM
A Chinese comfort food is steamed eggs. It's pretty healthy (2-3 eggs, water, and whatever sauce you want to put over it... I usually use black rice vinegar, soy sauce, sesame oil, and a homemade ground, dried hot peppers sauce). Looks something like this (http://a3.vox.com/6a0100a7f6f29c000e011017b30b9b860e-500pi)

Ajax
02-09-2010, 04:40 PM
A Chinese comfort food is steamed eggs. It's pretty healthy (2-3 eggs, water, and whatever sauce you want to put over it... I usually use black rice vinegar, soy sauce, sesame oil, and a homemade ground, dried hot peppers sauce). Looks something like this (http://a3.vox.com/6a0100a7f6f29c000e011017b30b9b860e-500pi)

Oooh, altai_rose, that actually looks delicious! Is the consistency kind of custardy, because that's what it looks like, or lighter? Can you elaborate on how to make it?

mkats
02-09-2010, 05:40 PM
My mom used to make that stuff for my sister when she was a baby. Some of my Chinese friends here have made it in the microwave :lol:

FiveRinger
02-10-2010, 01:29 AM
Yesterday, I finally found the lid to my crockpot. I had been wanting to try this recipe for Chicken Taco Soup.

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Slow-Cooker-Chicken-Taco-Soup/Detail.aspx

So, because we were expecting 4" of snow, I decided to make it for tonight. This is really good. I did add extra cumin and chili powder in at the end to give it a kick. I also substituted the beer for chicken stock. And because my can opener stopped working while I was preparing this, I used frozen corn instead of canned. I have to say it's delicious and there's plenty to eat over the next few days. A great low-cal option that has lots of protein and fiber.

Jodi
02-10-2010, 02:05 AM
I usually buy local free-range eggs from my greengrocer :rollin: Or, when I can, from a farm shop where they will tell you what day they were laid if you like :D It's freshness that makes the biggest difference I think, and you just can't get that from a supermarket in the same way.

altai_rose
02-10-2010, 04:38 AM
Oooh, altai_rose, that actually looks delicious! Is the consistency kind of custardy, because that's what it looks like, or lighter? Can you elaborate on how to make it?
It's lighter than a custard.

Here's how I make it. It's really simple, but you need something like the metal thing in this pot: steamer stand? (not sure about the name) (http://steamykitchen.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/matsutake-dobin-mushi-mushroom-recipe-019.jpg) You may be able to make it just by putting a bowl directly into a pot or with a microwave.

1. Beat 3 eggs with 1 tbs of water in a heat-proof bowl.
2. Add 1/2-3/4 cup of water and a dash of salt to the bowl. Beat.
3. Put the "steamer stand" into a large pot and fill the pot with water. Put the bowl with the eggs on top of the "steamer stand." The water level should be about 1/3 the way up the sides of the bowl.
4. Put the pot lid on, and steam on high heat for 15-20 min. Resist the temptation to open the lid!
5. Put sauce over it (I use soy sauce, vinegar, spicy ground red peppers, sesame oil)

While we're on the topic of steaming... one of my favorite ways of preparing Chinese-style fish is steamed fish stuffed with scallions, ginger, and oyster mushrooms. So good, so easy, and so healthy!

FiveRinger
02-10-2010, 04:42 PM
I have a question about making chicken soup.

I was in a restaurant on vacation and had the best chicken soup ever. It was really clear, which impressed me. It had chicken, carrots, celery and pasta (not noodles--I'm not really familiar with all of the different pastas. This one was a short pasta, not orzo or penne).

Anyway, my question is what did they do to the soup to make it so clear? I would love to try to make my own version. Is there a special technique?

Cupid
02-10-2010, 05:09 PM
^They probably strain the broth through a couple thicknesses of cheesecloth, refrigerate and then skim off the fat? Or they may just purchase a clear chicken broth and add cooked items to it and simmer.

neptune
02-10-2010, 05:35 PM
^They probably strain the broth through a couple thicknesses of cheesecloth, refrigerate and then skim off the fat?

Exactly, Cupid. You can also go one step further:

http://www.soupsong.com/bstock.html

Clarifying Stock!

[...]

For each quart of stock, you will use one slightly beaten egg white and one crumpled egg shell.

Either have the stock at room temperature, or cool down with ice cubes.

In a cooking pot, stir the egg whites and egg shells into the stock. Put the pot on a simmering heat and very slowly, without stirring, bring the mixture just to a simmer. As the sediments coagulate with the egg whites, a thick scum will rise to the surface of the liquid.

Don't succumb to the temptation of skimming the pot. Just push the scum aside so you can keep an eye on the simmer of the stock--anything close to a boil will disturb the clarifying process.

Simmer for about 10-15 minutes, then carefully remove the pot from the heat and let stand for anywhere from 10 minutes to an hour.

When you are ready to collect the stock, just push the scum aside and ladle the stock through a sieve lined with a cloth that has been dipped in hot water and wrung out. Let the stock cool to room temperature uncovered, then tightly close and refrigerate until you are ready to use it.

neptune
02-10-2010, 05:43 PM
I usually buy local free-range eggs from my greengrocer :rollin:

I used to think that "free range" really meant what it said. In fact, all the term means is that the hens aren't caged (or at least not full-time). They may never go outside their entire lives. Of course, those eggs are still better than "regular" eggs.


Or, when I can, from a farm shop where they will tell you what day they were laid if you like :D It's freshness that makes the biggest difference I think, and you just can't get that from a supermarket in the same way.

ITA, Jodi. :respec: Eggs are so much better when the hens are allowed to run around outside in the sunshine and eat grass, bugs, etc. The yolks are a lot brighter too. Chickens are not vegetarians! Lately, I've been getting eggs from a local farmer. She pencils a date on every single one. One time, she was an egg or too short, so she said, "Do you want to wait around about 30 minutes to see if one of the girls lays one?" Talk about fresh. :lol:

Ajax
02-10-2010, 05:50 PM
It's lighter than a custard.

Here's how I make it. It's really simple, but you need something like the metal thing in this pot: steamer stand? (not sure about the name) (http://steamykitchen.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/matsutake-dobin-mushi-mushroom-recipe-019.jpg) You may be able to make it just by putting a bowl directly into a pot or with a microwave.

1. Beat 3 eggs with 1 tbs of water in a heat-proof bowl.
2. Add 1/2-3/4 cup of water and a dash of salt to the bowl. Beat.
3. Put the "steamer stand" into a large pot and fill the pot with water. Put the bowl with the eggs on top of the "steamer stand." The water level should be about 1/3 the way up the sides of the bowl.
4. Put the pot lid on, and steam on high heat for 15-20 min. Resist the temptation to open the lid!
5. Put sauce over it (I use soy sauce, vinegar, spicy ground red peppers, sesame oil)

While we're on the topic of steaming... one of my favorite ways of preparing Chinese-style fish is steamed fish stuffed with scallions, ginger, and oyster mushrooms. So good, so easy, and so healthy!

Thank you! I'm trying to steam more food to be healthier so will definitely try this.
Steamed fish is also one of my favorites :)

FiveRinger
02-10-2010, 07:48 PM
Exactly, Cupid. You can also go one step further:

http://www.soupsong.com/bstock.html

Clarifying Stock!

[...]

For each quart of stock, you will use one slightly beaten egg white and one crumpled egg shell.

Either have the stock at room temperature, or cool down with ice cubes.

In a cooking pot, stir the egg whites and egg shells into the stock. Put the pot on a simmering heat and very slowly, without stirring, bring the mixture just to a simmer. As the sediments coagulate with the egg whites, a thick scum will rise to the surface of the liquid.

Don't succumb to the temptation of skimming the pot. Just push the scum aside so you can keep an eye on the simmer of the stock--anything close to a boil will disturb the clarifying process.

Simmer for about 10-15 minutes, then carefully remove the pot from the heat and let stand for anywhere from 10 minutes to an hour.

When you are ready to collect the stock, just push the scum aside and ladle the stock through a sieve lined with a cloth that has been dipped in hot water and wrung out. Let the stock cool to room temperature uncovered, then tightly close and refrigerate until you are ready to use it.

Thank you both!

I'm a little afraid of the clarifying process. When I work up my nerve, I'll give it a try and let you know how it works.

neptune
02-10-2010, 08:07 PM
Thank you both!

You're welcome, FiveRinger.


I'm a little afraid of the clarifying process.

It's OK--those egg whites won't jump out of the broth and hurt you or anything, as long as you're nice. ;)


When I work up my nerve, I'll give it a try and let you know how it works.

Yes, please do.

Jenny
02-10-2010, 08:20 PM
neptune and Jodi, you might enjoy these two books if you haven't already: The Omnivore's Dilemma by Michael Pollan contains a whole section on chicken farming and eggs that is most enlightening, and Animal Vegetable Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver also includes a section on the family's efforts to raise chickens and the young daughter's growing egg business.

Jodi
02-10-2010, 09:16 PM
I've been thinking for a while I should read Michael Pollan's books as the extracts and articles I've read online speak so much to what I've been feeling for years.


I used to think that "free range" really meant what it said. In fact, all the term means is that the hens aren't caged (or at least not full-time). They may never go outside their entire lives. Of course, those eggs are still better than "regular" eggs.
In the UK the requirements for free-range include outdoor access. Eggs from hens kept indoors but uncaged are sold as barn eggs. I'm aware it's still a mass-production system unless you seek out the small producers/suppliers, though.