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skaternum
01-12-2010, 08:28 PM
Ok, so how to I figure out which is my broiler w/o setting my whole kitchen on fire?

Tell us what make and model your stove/oven is. Maybe we can help.

Ajax
01-12-2010, 08:34 PM
The Village Idiot, in most standard American electric ovens, the broiler is at the top of the oven. If you're having trouble figuring out where it is, put a slice of bread on a rack in the middle of your oven and turn on the broiler. After 3-5 minutes, whichever side of the bread is getting black, that's the side your broiler is on :)

If your broiler is at the top of the oven, then you need to set the oven rack at the top 1/3 of the oven for proper boiling. Broiling is a fantastic way of cooking certain vegetables and fish. You can easily make roasted red peppers or roasted eggplant with your broiler for example.

For roasted red peppers, seed the peppers and cut each pepper into 3-4 pieces that would lie flat. Lay them skin-side up on a parchment or foil covered oven tray and place the tray on a rack as close to the broiler as possible. Broil until most of the skin is blackened and blistered. When done, place the peppers in a bowl or pot and cover tightly. Letting them stand 5 minutes like that will loosen the burnt skin, which you can then easily peel off. Ta-da, roasted red peppers :)

For eggplant, cut into 1/4-1/2 inch slices, brush on both sides with oil, again on tray covered with foil or parchment, broil 5-7 min each site until lightly browned. Much healthier and quicker than frying each slice in oil!

Couple of links:

A really good broiled salmon recipe: http://find.myrecipes.com/recipes/recipefinder.dyn?action=displayRecipe&recipe_id=1054902

An excellent Mark Bittman article on broiler cooking:
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/31/dining/31mini.html

Jenny
01-12-2010, 08:43 PM
Ajax, great tips! Just wanted to add that when I do roasted peppers, I put them in a paper or plastic bag and seal it up, the same way you do it with a bowl or pot, and it works perfectly.

Chopping/mashing roasted red peppers into mayo is a great way to elevate an ordinary sandwich, and one of my favourite cracker spreads/mushroom stuffings couldn't be simpler: roasted red peppers mixed into cream cheese (no salt or pepper required).

The Village Idiot
01-12-2010, 08:47 PM
The Village Idiot, in most standard American electric ovens, the broiler is at the top of the oven. If you're having trouble figuring out where it is, put a slice of bread on a rack in the middle of your oven and turn on the broiler. After 3-5 minutes, whichever side of the bread is getting black, that's the side your broiler is on :) Even if it's in the drawer under the oven? [/do not understand mechanics of stove]

FWIW, I have a Frigidaire gas stove. Not sure of the model, but it's fairly new (past 2 years or so).

mysticchic
01-12-2010, 09:11 PM
Cuban sandwiches....:inavoid:. I don't have a sandwich press, so I am using a brick wrapped up in aluminum foil, it seems to do the trick. Tonight will be the last night, as I am running out of French Bread and pickles.

hahahah Rex...your so cute. I got 2 pannini grills for Christmas. I'm going to return one of them, but that is very creative.

Ajax
01-12-2010, 09:56 PM
Even if it's in the drawer under the oven? [/do not understand mechanics of stove]


I don't have much experience with gas stoves or broilers in the drawer.... but I think it should work the same way? Just put the bread in the drawer (you can place it on foil if you don't have a rack in there. I assume if there's a drawer the broiler would be over it so the top of the bread should be the side that browns...

sk8pics
01-12-2010, 10:18 PM
I've posted this one before, but it's worth repeating - it's from Martha Stewart, an easy as can be tomato soup that tastes creamy and delicious, but actually contains no cream or milk. I've been making it for a couple of years now.

http://www.marthastewart.com/portal/site/mslo/menuitem.fc77a0dbc44dd1611e3bf410b5900aa0/?vgnextoid=064bd13cc97a7110VgnVCM1000003d370a0aRCR D&backto=true
I have made this a couple times now, since you first posted the link in this thread, and it's fabulous!:encore::encore: So thanks for posting it the first time!

I am about to get an actual roasting pan with a rack and am looking forward to trying it out soon, especially with all these helpful tips here.

piano18
01-12-2010, 11:02 PM
One time, I was *trying* to make pineapple upside down cake, when I ran out of pineapple juice, so I used some tropical fruit juice instead...and the result purely disgusting :mad::blah::blah:

The Village Idiot
01-13-2010, 12:51 AM
Update: broiler is in the oven (so pots can go back in the drawer - yippee!). I couldn't tell what was smoking, but I figured smoke = bad so I turned it off. wheee - fire! Kinda nifty. Pork chops were perfectly done. And the neighborhood is still standing. :)

Ajax
01-13-2010, 02:45 AM
Congrats!! :40beers:

Rex
01-13-2010, 03:11 AM
hahahah Rex...your so cute. I got 2 pannini grills for Christmas. I'm going to return one of them, but that is very creative.

I think I saw either Alton Brown or Tyler Florence do it....it's an old trick. But a sandwich grill would be better. LOL, I'll take your old one.

The Village Idiot
01-13-2010, 05:04 AM
Congrats!! :40beers: *curtsy* Thank you, thank you very much. I'm rather proud myself. :)

Japanfan
01-13-2010, 11:47 AM
I'm looking for some easy soup recipes? I like Crab bisque (sp), tomato, Mushroom, veggie soup. Any suggestions?
I have a great one for easy barley and ground beef to trade

You can make a cream soup with any vegetable (leek and potato is one of my favourites) - cook the vegetable, then mix flour with melted butter and add cream for a thick creamy sauce, and whisk in the vegetable/vegetable stock. Of course add garlic, onions and spices as you desire. Sprinkle with cheese and croutons for additional flair.

I also like to make a stock from prime rib beef bones I get at the local green grocer. All I do is simmer the bones with onions, garlic and a bit of wine. These are extremely fatty bones so they need to be removed and the consomme has to chill, so you can remove much of the fat.

The stock is always delicious and the meat on the bones is always tender - you can put them back in the soup, but they usually don't last that long in this house, between myself and the :dog:

Rex
01-13-2010, 02:21 PM
I have to go all the way down to the Italian Market to get bones if I want them. My local supermarket won't do jack. They throw away all of their bones and won't give them to anyone for legal reasons :mad:. I make my own chicken stock; I'd love to get some beef bones for some real beef stock.

FiveRinger
01-14-2010, 05:34 AM
I have to go all the way down to the Italian Market to get bones if I want them. My local supermarket won't do jack. They throw away all of their bones and won't give them to anyone for legal reasons :mad:. I make my own chicken stock; I'd love to get some beef bones for some real beef stock.

Would beef marrow bones work? I used to buy them cut up, season them and roast them in the oven just to give them to the dog because they were so cheap. (Can you tell that I don't do a lot of cooking?;)