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BigB08822
12-16-2009, 03:21 PM
Nice! I like the glass bowl, I wonder if I can buy just the bowl and use it with my mixer.

Habs
12-16-2009, 04:13 PM
I know! First thing I did this morning was run down to the kitchen to look at it, and maybe caress it just a little ...

Um.... I do that too.
And I named her Scarlett. :shuffle:

LordCirque
12-16-2009, 06:49 PM
:wuzrobbed of a KitchenAid!

Jenny
12-16-2009, 07:22 PM
Um.... I do that too.
And I named her Scarlett. :shuffle:

Mine is Betty, after Betty Crocker, who nearly singlehandedly made cake a staple at American tables for decades, and whose favourite colour was red. :o

And yes I am aware Betty wasn't a real person - it's actually a rather interesting story of evolving American cooking and the art of promotion, if you happen across the book by Susan Marks.

skaternum
12-16-2009, 09:01 PM
Now I feel like I need to name my KA. Only mine is white, so I guess it'd have to be something like June (for June Cleaver, one of the whitest white women on TV). :lol:

Habs
12-16-2009, 09:06 PM
Now I feel like I need to name my KA. Only mine is white, so I guess it'd have to be something like June (for June Cleaver, one of the whitest white women on TV). :lol:

A friend of mine has the pink KA stand mixer and named it Nadia :lol:

neptune
12-17-2009, 01:53 AM
I had posted a recipe earlier in this thread in response to Japanfan's request for a recipe for savory cheesecake. But at the time, I couldn't find the original recipe, so I posted a close approximation from the Web.

Anyway, I finally found the original recipe. It comes from Best of Cooking Light's Holidays, a newsstand publication from 1997. Of course, that means it's a great recipe for the holiday season.

Interestingly enough, the recipe doesn't say to drain the canned corn. Personally, if I made this again, I would use regular cottage cheese, thawed frozen corn (and add some water if necessary), and 3 eggs, among other things. In addition, spinach can be substituted for the watercress. Anyway, here is the recipe:

Savory Cheesecake

Serve this dish as an appetizer, an entrée for brunch, or a side dish with roast turkey.

Cooking spray
1/4 cup finely crushed onion melba toasts (about 9 pieces), divided
3 Tbsp. minced shallots
2 1/2 cups trimmed watercress
1/4 tsp. freshly ground pepper
2 cups 1% low-fat cottage cheese
3 oz. shredded provolone cheese or Gruyère cheese
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 tsp. salt
1 (11-oz.) can no-salt-added whole–kernel corn
2 large eggs
2 large egg whites
Watercress sprigs (optional)

Coat bottom of an 8-inch springform pan with cooking spray and sprinkle with 2 tablespoons melba toast crumbs; set aside. Preheat oven to 325 degrees.

Coat a medium nonstick skillet with nonstick spray and place over medium-high heat until hot. Add shallots; sauté one minute. Add trimmed watercress and pepper; sauté 2 minutes more.

In food processor, combine remaining melba toast crumbs, cottage cheese, and next 6 ingredients. Process until smooth, and then add watercress mixture and process until chopped.

Pour mixture into prepared pan and bake at 325 degrees for one hour and 15 minutes, or until almost set. Remove from oven and cool 15 minutes. Cover and chill 2 hours. Serve at room temperature. Garnish with watercress sprigs, if desired. Yield: 6 servings (serving size: 1 wedge).

Note: Make cheesecake up to 2 days ahead, if desired. Cover with foil; place in a zip-top plastic bag and refrigerate. Serve at room temperature.

Note: One (10-oz.) package frozen chopped spinach, thawed and well-drained, may be substituted for trimmed watercress, if desired.

Jenny
12-17-2009, 02:12 PM
So yesterday Betty and I cooked together for the first time. First, we made lussekatter, a traditional Swedish bread flavoured with saffron made for the holidays (recipe in this month's Saveur). The beauty of this recipe is that it requires both the paddle *and* the dough hook, whee!! Total perfection. To give you a sense of Betty's power, the dough was so heavy that when I went to scrap it out of the bowl, I actually broke a wooden spoon. The lussekatter turned out perfectly - texture was just right, absolutely delicious. A bit too brown on the bottom, but that could be my oven. As I've said, baking is not something I've really done since I was a kid.

Second item, while the dough for above was rising, was pimiento cheese. Food & Wine had a simple recipe from the Food Network Neelys this month as a quick hot appetizer on crostini sprinkled with bacon. What caught my eye was the instruction to use a stand mixer ... so I went to my favourite source of all things Southern, Martha Hall Foose's Screen Doors and Sweet Tea, and made her more complex recipe, only with Betty's help. Again, perfect. Didn't even get a chance to do the crostini, because after I "tested" it on a cracker, hubby and I ended up eating most of it and forgot to make dinner. :P

I woke up in the night trying to think of an excuse to use the wire whip. :rollin:

Habs
12-17-2009, 04:03 PM
I woke up in the night trying to think of an excuse to use the wire whip. :rollin:

I made a beautiful dessert a few nights ago when we had company over for supper... it featured both meringue AND whipped cream, and the wire whip was glorious for both.

Scarlett and I are going to have a long, meaningful relationship.... ;)

shan
12-18-2009, 08:01 PM
We got the anniversary model, red with glass bowl: http://www.kitchenaid.com/flash.cmd?/#/product/KSM158GBCA/

ooh pretty!! I love red!


This isn't a recipe, but I was reading the article about Kristi Y. on the Today Show website and found this article about food.

10 trends to watch in 2010 (http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/34448435/ns/today-today_food_and_wine/)

Some of them are very interesting. I don't know if I'm too keen on the whole idea butchering meat, but hey to each his own!

sk8pics
12-18-2009, 08:10 PM
So.... a question for everyone. I've been asked to bring an appetizer to Christmas dinner. Dinner is an Italian-style meal, more northern Italian than anything I suppose. Said appetizer has to travel well (about 2 1/2 hours in the car) and not involve too much work. Does anyone have any suggestions?

Jenny
12-18-2009, 09:20 PM
This isn't a recipe, but I was reading the article about Kristi Y. on the Today Show website and found this article about food.

10 trends to watch in 2010 (http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/34448435/ns/today-today_food_and_wine/)

Interesting - thanks for sharing!


So.... a question for everyone. I've been asked to bring an appetizer to Christmas dinner. Dinner is an Italian-style meal, more northern Italian than anything I suppose. Said appetizer has to travel well (about 2 1/2 hours in the car) and not involve too much work. Does anyone have any suggestions?

I'm no expert on regional Italian cuisines, but what about something simple such as blanched asparagus wrapped in proscuitto with a bit of oil and pepper? Not exactly seasonal though, so what about a selection of antipasti - get a few jars or deli items such as cold grilled veggies, peppers stuffed with goat cheese, olives, breadsticks? You could arrange them on a platter and make that a gift to the hostess. Similarly, you could get some nice bakery breads with 1-2 fancy olive oils (bonus if you flavour it yourself!) and balsamic vinegar.

sk8pics
12-19-2009, 02:17 PM
Thanks Jenny --those are good suggestions. In the meantime, I suggested to my cousin that I could make some mini-quiches, so that we could just pop them in the microwave when it's time, and they're travel well. She agreed very enthusiastically. I'm going to do a dry run this week when I have dinner company just to make sure they'll be okay. So if they're not so great I'll do something like what you suggested.

Jenny
12-19-2009, 03:49 PM
I don't know how Italian quiche is, but you can certainly make it Italian with flavourings. We have a quiche most weekends, so I've tried many combos and one of the best has been chopped up mortadella, sliced and lightly softened onions and hot peppers (or you could save a step with hot mortadella), and mozzarella cheese. Add a bit of parsley or basil and you have the colours of the Italian flag, and it's delicious!

Latest: We had dinner with friends at a new restaurant by one of our city's celebrity chefs, and had his signature Singapore Slaw among many other totally fabulous dishes. It's absolutely :swoon:, so we were trying to figure out all the ingredients. A quick search this morning turned it up on the FN site, and naturally it has 33 ingredients, several of which are not only difficult to find, but that I haven't even heard of! But I am determined to rise to this challenge, and am already planning a trip through the Asian markets to hunt it all down ...

sk8pics
12-19-2009, 05:24 PM
What a good idea! Thanks Jenny! I was going with quiche because I figured it would work out and would travel well, but all the better if it sort of fits in with the rest of the evening.