PDA

View Full Version : So Many Books, So Little Time (The Reading Thread)



Pages : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 [8] 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67

zaphyre14
10-08-2009, 02:49 PM
I just finsihed "Echo" over the weekend and while I enjoyed it, i confess that the "ending" felt more like the pre-quel for the next book: while a lot of old threads got tied up, a lot didn't and there's a whole new hank o' yarn thrown in to start new patterns. Too bad that it will be two or three years before the next book comes out.

So I've Switched gears to Jeannine Frost's vampire saga "Destined for an Early Grave." I enjoyed the first volumes but this one is taking a turn that reminds me a little too much of the way Laurel K Hamiliton's Anita Blake series went downhill when she shifted focus away from the mysteries. I'm only halfway through "Destined.." though so I'm hoping that the soap-opera histrionics will be taking a back seat soon and we'll get back to some kind of plot.

In the car I have Catherine Cioulter's "Blindside" going and I'm enjoying it. I'd read a couple of her historicals in the past and didn't care for them but this contemporary is holding my interest. The two kids are especially cute.

rfisher
10-09-2009, 02:01 AM
Normally, I read Gabaldon's books straight through, but I'm only managing a chapter a day with the latest. I've read another whole book in the meantime. Oh, and Holly, the soft porn ends in book 3 :( That was the best parts. :lol: Ms. Gabaldon thinks she's much too literary to write sex scenes any more. :drama:

I just finished a funny OTT book described as House meets the Sopranos which is pretty accurate. It's Beat the Reaper by Josh Bazell. If you work in medicine, you'll laugh out loud. If you work for the mob, maybe you'll laugh.

Prancer
10-09-2009, 02:55 AM
I just finished a funny OTT book described as House meets the Sopranos which is pretty accurate. It's Beat the Reaper by Josh Bazell. If you work in medicine, you'll laugh out loud. If you work for the mob, maybe you'll laugh.

I just read that one. The medical stuff is :yikes:. I laughed, but it was all just a little too true to be too funny.

I give my fibula a little pat every now and then, because even if it's useless, I'm still quite fond of it and want it to stay right where it is.

Wyliefan
10-09-2009, 04:19 AM
This novel (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/booker-prize/6271036/Hilary-Mantel-health-or-the-Man-Booker-Prize-Id-take-health.html) about Thomas Cromwell looks interesting, and it just won the Man Booker Prize. (Man Booker Prize? I thought it was just "Booker Prize.") I like the author's quote about how Henry VIII would have gladly taken credit for her work. :)

Apologies if this was mentioned already. I haven't kept up with the thread very well.

Holley Calmes
10-09-2009, 04:36 AM
Thanks for the advice rfisher, but I gave up on Outlander. There just wasn't any plot, and if I want to read the hoochie parts for some thrills, I'll just graze through and find them like I used to do as a kid with those, uh, more mature books my friend and I found in her Dad's closet.

I started the new Debra Crombie instead and find it such refreshment after days of wandering about the Highlands. I also bought a new Mo Hayder. Glad to return to crime, murder, and detection.

rfisher
10-09-2009, 12:20 PM
I just read that one. The medical stuff is :yikes:. I laughed, but it was all just a little too true to be too funny.

I give my fibula a little pat every now and then, because even if it's useless, I'm still quite fond of it and want it to stay right where it is.

I've known interns and medical students like those in the book. That was the scary part. I hope he writes a sequel.

Prancer
10-09-2009, 07:27 PM
I've known interns and medical students like those in the book.

The part where he checks charts and every single patient has normal TPR and BP, including the dead patient and the guy who is septic?

And when the med students kill the patient trying to save him because they aren't being properly supervised and are trying to show initiative?

Been there; lived that. :scream: Knew some pill poppers, too.

Like I said, I laughed at a lot of it, but I was wincing at the same time.

rfisher
10-10-2009, 01:48 AM
The part where he checks charts and every single patient has normal TPR and BP, including the dead patient and the guy who is septic?

And when the med students kill the patient trying to save him because they aren't being properly supervised and are trying to show initiative?

Been there; lived that. :scream: Knew some pill poppers, too.

Like I said, I laughed at a lot of it, but I was wincing at the same time.

I suspect the author drew on his own experiences in med school, albeit, exaggerated. At least you know how to defend yourself if you have no weapons at hand, assuming you don't bleed to death first. :lol:

I have to say, the flashback technique worked to provide the back story, and I didn't predict the whole grandparent thing, although when I finished the book, I realized he'd given clues all along. I was just caught up enough in the story to not pick up on all the hints.

This is a book I could reread.

Prancer
10-10-2009, 02:37 AM
I have to say, the flashback technique worked to provide the back story, and I didn't predict the whole grandparent thing, although when I finished the book, I realized he'd given clues all along. I was just caught up enough in the story to not pick up on all the hints.

I wondered about the tattoo thing when I read it; it really jumped out at me, but I didn't get what it meant.

I did see the weapon coming, but I kept hoping I was wrong about that one :yikes:.

I had to have my car serviced today, so I hiked down to Border's to wait and started reading Pipsqueak (http://www.amazon.com/Pipsqueak-Dell-Mystery-Brian-Wiprud/dp/0440241871), which was just about perfect "waiting for the car to be finished" reading.

I don't know when I'll finish it with all the spreadsheets now calling my name, but it's one I will get back to.

rfisher
10-10-2009, 12:11 PM
I had to have my car serviced today, so I hiked down to Border's to wait and started reading Pipsqueak (http://www.amazon.com/Pipsqueak-Dell-Mystery-Brian-Wiprud/dp/0440241871), which was just about perfect "waiting for the car to be finished" reading.

I don't know when I'll finish it with all the spreadsheets now calling my name, but it's one I will get back to.

That looks amusing. I have a Border's coupon to spend.

IceAlisa
10-10-2009, 06:13 PM
I've known interns and medical students like those in the book. That was the scary part. I hope he writes a sequel.

I am guessing you and Prancer have read The House of God which is my favorite book about medicine ever.

mila19
10-10-2009, 09:29 PM
I'm curious to read Madeleine Albright's books. Didn't know she actually sent messages through her pins and it made me smile when I read it somewhere as I remembered my mother was in perpetual awe of her brooches :lol:

jeffisjeff
10-11-2009, 07:15 AM
I'm curious to read Madeleine Albright's books. Didn't know she actually sent messages through her pins and it made me smile when I read it somewhere as I remembered my mother was in perpetual awe of her brooches :lol:

I saw that in a news story and was :rofl: :


After being called an “unparalleled serpent” by the Iraqi press in 1994, Madeleine Albright met the country’s officials wearing a snake brooch.

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601070&sid=aYymlox3k_Dk

Wyliefan
10-12-2009, 01:21 AM
I'm now reading Wanting by Richard Flanagan, but I'm afraid I can't recommend it. Some of the clunkiest prose I've read in a long time. The dialogue is particularly cringeworthy, of the "Here, have a nice heaping helping of exposition!" type.

IceAlisa
10-12-2009, 01:41 AM
I saw that in a news story and was :rofl: :



http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601070&sid=aYymlox3k_Dk

That's one way to get me to read a political memoir--talk about jewelry! I would love to read this book.