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View Full Version : So Many Books, So Little Time (The Reading Thread)



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rfisher
06-22-2010, 01:39 PM
OTOH I think there's been some pressure on her to release her books before the season starts for publicity reasons.

Probably, although books like hers and Evanovich's are good summer reads so the publishers often release them in late May or in June to hit readers on their way to vacation.

Speaking of JE, her latest Plum comes out today. The price is being deeply discounted. Borders is knocking it down 45%. I'm certain B&N is doing the same. It never made it to the top of Border's top 10 pre-order list, unlike Jean Auel's new Earth Children's book which isn't even due out until next year. And, the latest in the motormouth series actually has her daughter Alex listed as co-author. The thought is that Alex has written the last 3 Plums under her mother's name which is part of the reason they've been so bad.

I'm using my 33% off coupon for the latest Carolyn Haines which is also out today. :cheer2:

I've discovered C.J. Box's Joe Picket series. I listened to one on audio book from the library and have bought some of the earlier books in the series. Picket is a Wyoming game warden who inadvertently finds himself involved in the usual homicide. Box throws in a lot of Wyoming history, biology, ecology and info about the Game and Fish so they're similar to Nevada Barr's Anna Pigeon series, but Joe isn't as annoying as Anna can be.

I'm also reading my way through Margaret Maron's Deborah Knott series set in North Carolina. Oddly, most of the books aren't really focused on Deborah, although, she manages to be placed in mortal danger by stumbling into things. Since you know that's going to happen, you just overlook the *mystery* and focus on the character development. :lol:

zaphyre14
06-22-2010, 03:28 PM
I finished "Abraham Lincoln, Vampire Hunter" with a shrug for it's mediocrity, and polished off Tracy Chevalier's "Remarkable Creatures" with an "it's okay" mental rating. I'm now almost done with Elaine Viets' "Killer Cuts" Dead End job pseudo-mystery. It reads like Miss Marple and the Keystone Kops Take Miami - not much character development and the main subplot is Helen's Super Budget wedding planning.

In the car I'm still on the Women's Murder Club kick.

Wyliefan
06-22-2010, 04:48 PM
It reads like Miss Marple and the Keystone Kops Take Miami

:rofl: Awesome description. I hope you're a book reviewer in real life. If you're not, you should be.

Rex
06-22-2010, 08:37 PM
I've started on a bio on Vivien Leigh, which is actually based on letters between her and her first husband, with whom she remained friends with even after their divorce and her marriage to Sir Olivier. I love bios written by Brits - they are always extra-long with lots of dishy footnotes.

When I'm done with that - Truman Capote. I've always found him insufferable but interesting. Maybe it will inspire me to read more of his stuff.

Prancer
06-23-2010, 01:59 AM
I didn't even try. Let me know if I should. Ms. Cain is a seriously distrubed young woman. Yet she looks so normal in her jacket shot. :lol:

I'm trying, really I am, but the first few chapters have been so sick that I keep putting the book down and picking something else up. Then I see it and remember that I want to know what happens to Archie, so I read a few more pages. Then I do it all again.


There's a reviewer at ew.com who takes issue with what she sees as Larson trying to have his feminist cake and eating the public's appetite for salacious violence against women too in his writing.

I think there's truth in that, but I think the real appetite-whetter in his books is Salander's violence against men, which is presented in a rather glowing way even if a few of the characters in the book occasionally point out that Salander has problems.


Larson's writing reminds me A LOT of Dick Francis in his heyday. That's not a slam - I love me some Dick Francis. But the not-particularly-handsome, practically egoless everyman who nonetheless gets the girl (or five) while fighting the good fight and remaining insanely ethical in the face of a slew of personal affronts and all-out attacks...those are so central to all of Francis' books he should have trademarked them. All the Millenium trilogy needs is for the Vangers to have owned thoroughbreds or for Salander to have taken advantage of her small stature to become Sweden's plucky girl-jockey-with-a-past and it could be the Dick Francis very adult line of books.

I had never made that association before, but you're right--only I like Francis's heroes, while I find Mikael really boring--in part, I think, because he is such an autobiographical creation that he isn't allowed to be interesting. Francis's heroes are so hard on themselves that you know their ethics come at personal price, but Mikael pretty much sails along without ever looking into his own abyss. Or maybe he does in the third book; he certainly doesn't in the first two.

Grannyfan
06-23-2010, 02:20 AM
I'm finishing up John Hart's The Last Child. I'd recommend it to those who like crime thrillers.

genevieve
06-23-2010, 02:39 AM
I had never made that association before, but you're right--only I like Francis's heroes, while I find Mikael really boring--in part, I think, because he is such an autobiographical creation that he isn't allowed to be interesting. Francis's heroes are so hard on themselves that you know their ethics come at personal price, but Mikael pretty much sails along without ever looking into his own abyss. Or maybe he does in the third book; he certainly doesn't in the first two.
True - Francis's protagonists always seem vaguely autobiographical, but perhaps an extension of how DF wanted to be, rather than how he really saw himself (which is def how I see Mikael). Plus, Francis did a lot of research into whatever non-horsy elements he brought to the books (small plane pilot, winemaking, detective, writer of adventure travel books, banking, etc), and that usually added another element to the character, whereas Mikael is just...Mikael. Although the fact that he's such a blank slate compared to the highly volatile Salander is one of the things I think works in the books. It's almost like we're invited to see the story through his eyes because there's so little about him to actually see.

IceAlisa
06-23-2010, 03:09 AM
Started Anchee Min's Empress Orchid.

Melly80
06-23-2010, 07:45 AM
Started Anchee Min's Empress Orchid.

Good book! I read it some years ago, it's really fascinating. I diddn't know much about Chinese history and culture/traditions before, so it was really interesting.

rfisher
06-23-2010, 11:31 AM
I'm trying, really I am, but the first few chapters have been so sick that I keep putting the book down and picking something else up. Then I see it and remember that I want to know what happens to Archie, so I read a few more pages. Then I do it all again.
.

That's what I was afraid of. This has to be the last one. Archie simply has to jump off a tall bridge or something and take that monster with him. You really have to wonder at the mind of the author.

Prancer
06-23-2010, 12:23 PM
Archie simply has to jump off a tall bridge or something and take that monster with him. You really have to wonder at the mind of the author.

I think she just tries to think of the grossest thing she can and then tries to make it grosser.

But I have predicted a certain ending for the book and I want to see if I am right--plus things have improved a bit now that she's gotten the attention-grabbing shocker intro out of the way.

And with that, I think we get a new thread. http://www.fsuniverse.net/forum/showthread.php?t=74050