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View Full Version : So Many Books, So Little Time (The Reading Thread)



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zaphyre14
06-16-2010, 02:00 PM
I stopped into the library last night to orsder more of the Marcia Muller audio books, and the one Lindsey Davis Falco book I can't locate anywhere (well, Amazon has it but I'm not paying $22.95 for a paperback), "A Dying Light in Cordoba".

While idly waiting to check out I scanned the New Fiction shelf and picked up "Abraham Lincoln, Vampire Hunter." I started it last night; while the concept is intriguing, I can't say I'm thrilled with the writing but I'll read it anyway.

Prancer
06-17-2010, 07:17 AM
More disturbing than Chelsie Cain's stuff? I couldn't read the 3rd book. The relationship with Archie was freaking me out.

Did you try to read the third one or did you skip it because you were too squicked out by the second one?

I got the third one from the library today. I'm going in.

jen_faith
06-17-2010, 10:21 AM
While idly waiting to check out I scanned the New Fiction shelf and picked up "Abraham Lincoln, Vampire Hunter." I started it last night; while the concept is intriguing, I can't say I'm thrilled with the writing but I'll read it anyway.


Heh... I just read that one. An interesting conceit that started off not too bad then kind of degenerated into a bit of a hackneyed story. At least the vampires aren't sparkly and consumed with angst and the photoshopped photos were a nice touch.

Finally gave in and started reading the Steig Larsson (sp) books. Got part way through the first one (Dragon Tattoo) then skipped masses of the middle with all the incest, rape, serial killing because I hate books like that--not so much because that sort of stuff is part of the plot but because it irks me that pretty much any book these days that is considered a DEEP or INTERESTING book has that sort of stuff as part of its plot. It's like the authors go through a checklist rape - yup (preferrably homosexual rape and if we can squeeze in homosexual child rape then we can check off two boxes at once :rolleyes:); murder - serial gruesome murder would be even better - check; angst - check; dysfunctional family - yup; lotsa sex - yup etc etc .

Obviously I am a boor when it comes to "literature" but I don't care anymore. My free time is so limited, I don't want to waste it by plodding through formulaic plots.

Grumble...

rfisher
06-17-2010, 11:58 AM
Did you try to read the third one or did you skip it because you were too squicked out by the second one?

I got the third one from the library today. I'm going in.

I didn't even try. Let me know if I should. Ms. Cain is a seriously distrubed young woman. Yet she looks so normal in her jacket shot. :lol:

Prancer
06-17-2010, 03:10 PM
Obviously I am a boor when it comes to "literature" but I don't care anymore.

Steig Larson isn't literature. :lol: But he was a self-proclaimed feminist and, like most feminists, had a rather passionate interest in issues involving women and violence and how his particular society condones and even promotes the mistreatment of women while patting itself on the back for it's enlightenment. His books are generally considered more than your ordinary formulaic thrillers because of the social critique aspect of the works....but that doesn't mean you have to like them :lol:.


I didn't even try. Let me know if I should.

I'm hoping that Archie either experiences a miracle or dies in some sort of redemptive way, because no one as damaged as he is should be condemned to live.

Wyliefan
06-17-2010, 03:14 PM
Oh boy, new book about Beethoven's Ninth (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/06/16/AR2010061605096.html)! I read the review an hour ago, and I've now got it reserved at Borders and got my 40 percent coupon printed out.

You know, they really need to declare a temporary moratorium on publishing, just to give me a little time to catch up. :D

genevieve
06-20-2010, 05:00 AM
Finished Hornet's Nest a couple of days ago. There are some nice 'full circle' moments, but I'm bummed that the intended 10-part series will never come to pass (well, not by the original author, anyway). I was convinced after book 2 that we'd have Lisbeth's sister in the third book...alas only a few brief mentions toward the end to make sure we remember there is a sister who would have eventually been brought into the series. sigh.



Steig Larson isn't literature. :lol: But he was a self-proclaimed feminist and, like most feminists, had a rather passionate interest in issues involving women and violence and how his particular society condones and even promotes the mistreatment of women while patting itself on the back for it's enlightenment. His books are generally considered more than your ordinary formulaic thrillers because of the social critique aspect of the works....but that doesn't mean you have to like them :lol:.


There's a reviewer at ew.com who takes issue with what she sees as Larson trying to have his feminist cake and eating the public's appetite for salacious violence against women too in his writing. I enjoy his books a great deal, but admit that in the third book, when Berger's house is broken into and she realizes that the sex tape she made with her hubby and another man was among the items taken it crossed the threshold of believability for me.

Larson's writing reminds me A LOT of Dick Francis in his heyday. That's not a slam - I love me some Dick Francis. But the not-particularly-handsome, practically egoless everyman who nonetheless gets the girl (or five) while fighting the good fight and remaining insanely ethical in the face of a slew of personal affronts and all-out attacks...those are so central to all of Francis' books he should have trademarked them. All the Millenium trilogy needs is for the Vangers to have owned thoroughbreds or for Salander to have taken advantage of her small stature to become Sweden's plucky girl-jockey-with-a-past and it could be the Dick Francis very adult line of books.

genevieve
06-20-2010, 05:07 AM
Whee, I'm going to annoy myself by posting after my own post :P

I have a friend who lends me a lot of books at once, things she thinks I'll like. Sometimes it takes me a while :shuffle: Since I finished Hornet's Nest, I've been jonesing for a new book (and still not up for Chronic City, which stares at me balefully from my bedside table), so last night I fished around one of my bookshelves and came up with The Intuitionist by Colson Whitehead. Started it before going to sleep last night and I was hooked. Woke up today to find that he has a new book out and did a reading last night at a book store 6 blocks from my house :wuzrobbed Also found out that he was doing a reading at another bookstore tonight north of the city, so I took the bus up there to see him - he was very entertaining. I bought his newest book, Sag Harbor, which is next on my list once I finish the current one. I think he's got 3 other books as well.

Michalle
06-20-2010, 08:33 AM
Steig Larson isn't literature. :lol: But he was a self-proclaimed feminist and, like most feminists, had a rather passionate interest in issues involving women and violence and how his particular society condones and even promotes the mistreatment of women while patting itself on the back for it's enlightenment. His books are generally considered more than your ordinary formulaic thrillers because of the social critique aspect of the works....but that doesn't mean you have to like them :lol:.


I didn't like the first book because I thought in some ways that was what he was doing - condemning violence against women while writing about it in a rather exploitative manner - the drawn out descriptions of really grotesque sexual violence that I thought were to some extent meant to titillate.

With regard to Colson Whitehead, mentioned elsewhere on the thread, The Intuitionist is a stunning book, but I was disappointed by John Henry Days (his next book) to the extent that I almost wondered if he'd written it first and then only managed to get it published b/c of the success of The Intuitionist. It seemed less sophisticated, less interesting.

Holley Calmes
06-20-2010, 09:10 PM
Along that same line is Karen Slaughter's new book "Broken." It hits the bookstores June 22, but I got a copy because I had the pleasure of interviewing Karen again this year. She starts her book tour near my home on the 22nd, though I can't go see her this time. I was once again blown away by her depth, intelligence...and her fabulous personality. Big girl crush.

In discussions with her, she has stated that almost all her work touches on violence against women...but also children and also MEN....because men can be brutalized too. "Broken" is really good-finished it last night. It's not as gorey as most of her others, and she carries on the Grant County/Atlanta theme and characters with good effect. I really love her books.

She recommended her friend Mo Hayder to me last year, and I tried to read these as well, but they creeped me out too much, and for me, that's saying a lot. Anybody else read Hayder?

PrincessLeppard
06-20-2010, 10:51 PM
I finished Terry Pratchett's Unseen Academicals on the flight home. Some great moments, but overall, it felt....stretched?

And while Vimes and Angua make cameo appearances, I really miss the Watch. I wish he'd write another one with Carrot and the gang. Oh, and the Luggage shows up briefly as well.

Isn't Pratchett very ill? eta: Alzheimer's. http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/1986843/posts

IceAlisa
06-20-2010, 11:45 PM
Almost done with Blonde. It is quickly climbing the charts as one of my favorite books.

Here's a discussion of the novel: http://www.harpercollins.com/author/authorExtra.aspx?isbn13=9780060934934&displayType=readingGuide

Evilynn
06-21-2010, 02:39 PM
Isn't Pratchett very ill? eta: Alzheimer's. http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/1986843/posts

The last I heard was that he thought (and hoped) he had a couple of more books in him. UA probably wasn't written when I read that though. :(

I read Charlaine Harris' 'Dead in the Family (http://www.amazon.com/Dead-Family-Sookie-Stackhouse-Book/dp/0441018645/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1277127533&sr=8-1)' over the weekend, and it seemed even more illogical and filled with plot holes than usual. :lol: I wonder if she feels she has to crank them out faster with True Blood nipping at her heels.

rfisher
06-21-2010, 03:04 PM
The last I heard was that he thought (and hoped) he had a couple of more books in him. UA probably wasn't written when I read that though. :(

I read Charlaine Harris' 'Dead in the Family (http://www.amazon.com/Dead-Family-Sookie-Stackhouse-Book/dp/0441018645/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1277127533&sr=8-1)' over the weekend, and it seemed even more illogical and filled with plot holes than usual. :lol: I wonder if she feels she has to crank them out faster with True Blood nipping at her heels.

I think she's only planning 3 more at the most. She's out of storylines. I doubt True Blood would last long enough to get through all the existing books. :lol: The fad for vamps will be over before that happens.

Evilynn
06-22-2010, 01:17 PM
I think she's only planning 3 more at the most. She's out of storylines. I doubt True Blood would last long enough to get through all the existing books. :lol: The fad for vamps will be over before that happens.

TB are pulling in parts of later books into the earlier seasons, so I doubt it'd be one season per book anyway. :) (in the case of some of the books I'm quite glad, the last one for instance isn't anyway near substantial enough to warrant a whole season). OTOH I think there's been some pressure on her to release her books before the season starts for publicity reasons.