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View Full Version : So Many Books, So Little Time (The Reading Thread)



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IceAlisa
06-09-2010, 04:02 AM
I liked it more than the other two.

PrincessLeppard
06-10-2010, 04:41 PM
Paging PrincessLeppard!

Have you ever read The Adoration of Jenna Fox (http://www.amazon.com/Adoration-Jenna-Fox-Mary-Pearson/dp/0805076689)? It sounds like your sort of YA book.

I got it today and will read it on the plane tomorrow. However, if you continue to mock my hobbies via rep the thing that can't be named, I won't tell you how it is :drama:

IceAlisa
06-10-2010, 05:25 PM
Speaking of summer reading piles, mine is as follows:

Harlot's Ghost by Norman Mailer
The Last Empress and Empress Orchid both by Anchee Lee (love stories about strong women and by strong women, this is about the Chinese Empress Ci Xi)
A Bloodsmoor Romance by JCO (thanks to Prancer and my friend IRL for the rec)
The Gravedigger's Daughter by JCO
Faithful Place by Tana French (out in July)
Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh (a sure thing since mlp recommends it ;))

I will make more additions later but these are definitely on. I tend to lighten up my reading material in the summer, somewhat.

What's yours?

IceAlisa
06-10-2010, 05:33 PM
Sorry for the double post: a friend has been raving about "World Without End"by Ken Follett. Now this is a friend with a highly questionable taste--she is a hard core Twilight fan in her late 30s. :scream: Sorry, Twilight fans.

So I don't immediately trust her recommendations. Apparently this is a sequel to "The Pillars of The Earth".

What do you bookworms think? Prancer if you know about these, do you think I would like it?

Another friend whose tastes coincide with mine more recommended "The Piano Teacher" and "Cutting for Stone" by Abraham Verghese. Opinions?

immoimeme
06-10-2010, 10:40 PM
Pillars of the Earth and World Without End are two very good books.

immoimeme
06-10-2010, 10:41 PM
Noooooooo! I just bought that one for my summer reading pile!
Well put it at the bottom of the pile. Nothing bad will happen if you never get around to reading it. :P

Jenny
06-10-2010, 10:53 PM
I haven't been engaged in this thread for awhile, so please forgive if this book has come up before ... but I just finished The Bolter by Frances Osborne, and highly, highly recommend.

It's the life of Idina Sackville, infamous queen bee of Kenya's Happy Valley set in the 1920s and 1930s, and ex wife of Lord Erroll, whose murder was notably documented in James Fox's White Mischief and the subsequent movie in the 1980s.

It's very well written, with a nice personal without being boastful/snobby spin as it's written by her great granddaughter. Almost novel-like at times, totally fascinating.

I have the author's first book, Lilla's Feast about another great grandmother, shipping from Amazon today. :)

Michalle
06-11-2010, 12:48 AM
Brideshead Revisited is spectacular, and if you like that, his book "A Handful of Dust" is really good as well. Warning - both have quite a melancholy tone although the latter mixes that with a lot of humor.

jeffisjeff
06-11-2010, 02:01 AM
Well put it at the bottom of the pile. Nothing bad will happen if you never get around to reading it. :P

I'm reading it now and like it, but it isn't the page turner the others were. Several people (all women :lol: ) have come up to me, having seen me reading it, and said "Oh, it is such a good book. You'll be up all night." Well, it has been 3 nights and I've had plenty of sleep. ;) Still, I am enjoying it.

I had meant to read World Without End when it first came out, but then forgot about it. I'll have to order it. I really liked Pillars of the Earth.

IceAlisa
06-11-2010, 02:12 AM
Brideshead Revisited is spectacular, and if you like that, his book "A Handful of Dust" is really good as well. Warning - both have quite a melancholy tone although the latter mixes that with a lot of humor.

I have read "A Handful of Dust" as as well "Scoop" and "The Loved One"--all three were good.

Prancer
06-11-2010, 02:56 AM
However, if you continue to mock my hobbies via rep the thing that can't be named, I won't tell you how it is :drama:

Since you took your good old time about it, I already bought it and it's on my reading pile already. The kids won't need a book for a while yet.

So there. Check your User CP :P


What do you bookworms think? Prancer if you know about these, do you think I would like it?

I've read only one Ken Follett book (Eye of the Needle) and it was so long ago that I don't remember much about it. I did like it.


Well put it at the bottom of the pile. Nothing bad will happen if you never get around to reading it. :P

I am pretty sure that it would cause a rift in the space-time continuum, or at the very least make me crazy and take up an awful lot of space at relatively great expense for nothing.

Evilynn
06-11-2010, 09:56 AM
I finished 'Sundiver' and I don't feel particularly compelled to buy the other two books in the Uplift War. It wasn't horrendous, but it was clunky and kinda meh and while I like twisty plots I'm not as enamoured by multiple Deus Ex Machinas.

I moved on to Charles de Lint, who's aeons better stylistically ('Spirits in the Wire (http://www.amazon.com/Spirits-Wires-Newford-Charles-Lint/dp/0312869711/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1276246516&sr=8-1)') and I'm giving audio books another go by finally listening to Neil Gaiman read 'Coraline (http://www.amazon.com/Coraline-Neil-Gaiman/dp/006051048X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1276246539&sr=1-1)'. Listening comprehension apparently isn't my forte, because I keep zoning out, and it's not because of Gaiman's reading (which is brilliant), I just have a hard time absorbing info through my ears only. :(

rfisher
06-11-2010, 12:10 PM
I've read John Sandford's Prey series intermittently but have decided to read them all since listening to an interview with him. He cheerfully admits he wrote them to make money. :lol: I like that in an author. He studied the genre and picked the qualities most likely to appeal to women readers and wrote away. 17 books later he's made a lot of money. While most successful authors clearly have done so, he's not the least bit coy.

I also listened to one of CJ Box's Joe Picket novels and liked it so I'm buying some of them. (Border's has another 25% off everything coupoun this weekend :cheer: ) Picket is a game warden in Wyoming.

These will be good to sit by the pool and protect the new puppy from being dragged around the yard by the big Poodle.

IceAlisa
06-11-2010, 05:23 PM
Added Eye Of The Needle by Ken Follett to the summer list.



Listening comprehension apparently isn't my forte, because I keep zoning out, and it's not because of Gaiman's reading (which is brilliant), I just have a hard time absorbing info through my ears only. :(
I hear ya, no pun intended. I am much better visually and don't own a single audio book. Plus I really enjoy the reading experience, sitting down quietly with a real book. I don't have a Kindle either. I am so old-fashioned in that respect. :shuffle:

Jenny
06-11-2010, 05:36 PM
I really enjoyed Ken Follett's earliest novels, Paper Money and The Modigliani Scandal.