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View Full Version : So Many Books, So Little Time (The Reading Thread)



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Matryeshka
06-07-2010, 04:51 AM
Ooh, I loved Mulholland Drive. Do the two go hand in hand? :lol:

:scream: I guess they must.

I'm on a Sara Paretsky kick right now. Just started Ghost Town. I read Bleeding Kansas and really liked it, so I'm going back after a loooong hiatus and picking up the VI Warshowski novels again. It's funny--having read Bleeding Kansas, I can see the idea for it germinating in Ghost Town,, which was published before it.

shells
06-07-2010, 05:10 AM
:P I would make a horrible book store employee. I'd sit in the corner reading all day, not wanting to be disturbed.

I thought that too, except....you know what's more fun than sitting and reading? Talking to other people about the books you love! I can't even describe how awesome it was when people would take a suggestion and then come back for more. I even had a customer who called several different stores looking for me for more suggestions after I moved from one store to another. That was pretty great, I have to say.

IceAlisa
06-07-2010, 05:37 AM
I thought that too, except....you know what's more fun than sitting and reading? Talking to other people about the books you love! I can't even describe how awesome it was when people would take a suggestion and then come back for more. I even had a customer who called several different stores looking for me for more suggestions after I moved from one store to another. That was pretty great, I have to say.

That IS really great. :respec: I have a tradition of going to the same tiny bookstore on the East Coast every summer where the service is so personalized and the recommendations are right on. It's exactly like The Little Bookshop Around The Corner in that You've Got Mail movie, except for adults.

That's how I discovered Kate Atkinson and Tana French. Lately, it's been the other way around--I've been recommending the books to the owner.

May be when I retire I will take a job in a bookstore a few times a week. Thanks for the suggestion! :)

Prancer
06-07-2010, 11:51 AM
I liked Child 44, but there were some definite :scream: parts in that book. Made worse in that many of them were true.

Let me know how the sequel is.

Okay, I recommend it, with the following caveats. It’s not as good as Child 44. Child 44 was an ambitious book; this one is even more so, and at times the story suffers because of the demands of the plot. Credulity is sometimes strained and characters aren’t quite as developed as they could be. And your favorite character, the annoying teenager whose reckless, self-centered behavior sets off a chain of disasters, is a feature. Some of the story is quite predictable, especially where the annoying teenager is concerned. Smith still does that irritating –italics dialogue.

However, once the story gets going, it gallops right along. There is a lot of action (and lots of violence) and suspense. Leo once again has convinced himself that he is redeemed and once again gets to face the realization that he has not even fully recognized the depth and breadth of his sins or begun to grasp the broader implications, but that part of the story kind of fizzles out because he has more important things to do than brood. There is a potentially interesting subplot about Leo and revenge, but it sort of slips off the radar.

You will have a slightly new take on Mafia Wars after this :P. And if you are anything like me, you will have a near-religious gratitude that you did not have to live in the Soviet Union under Stalin.

There is a third book due to come out soon.


More disturbing than Chelsie Cain's stuff? I couldn't read the 3rd book. The relationship with Archie was freaking me out.

Yes, book one was okay, if gruesome, but book two was just :scream:.

They're very different. Child 44 was about an MGB officer officer under Stalin who truly believes that he is doing the right thing by ferreting out enemies of the state. When children's bodies begin to turn up and he begins to suspect that there is a serial killer on the loose, he is faced with a tricky political situation. The state is unwilling to allow the investigation of the child murders because that would mean that there is a deviant in their society, and that simply isn't possible. But Leo's conscience is bothered by one family's suffering, and this triggers a long and complex chain of events that completely transfoms his life. Nothing is what he believed it to be.

The murders are based on a real case (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrei_Chikatilo) (although somewhat displaced time-wise) and of course so are all the activities of the secret police, which are described in some detail. It's not what you would call a fun read, but it's gripping.

I have a book in my TBR pile you might like: The Crossing Places (http://www.amazon.com/Crossing-Places-Ruth-Galloway-Mystery/dp/0547229895) by Ellie Griffiths. You can tell me if the archeology in it is any good; the author used to work in publishing, but her husband is an archeologist, so there's hope :). The mystery is supposed to be so-so, but the writing and the characters have gotten a lot of raves.

Evilynn
06-07-2010, 12:20 PM
Ooh, I loved Mulholland Drive. Do the two go hand in hand? :lol:

It's quite possible, I already outed myself as a David Lynch fan earlier in this thread, I think. :lol:

I realized part of the reason why Sundiver sits badly with me, it was published in 1980, so it has that Old Sk00l SF style that I've never much liked. I ended up re-reading Pär Lagerkvist's 'The Hangman' and George RR Martin's 'A Song for Lya' on Sunday, rather than finishing Sundiver. :shuffle:

Southpaw
06-07-2010, 04:40 PM
If you're actually serious about this? Try Borders or Barnes & Noble. I have no idea if they let staff borrow the books like I used to be able to, but at the very least they must offer an employee discount. Cheap books are nice too.

I got burned on that policy once. The book got wet and I had to buy it. Grrrr.... :angryfire

I started reading "Mysteries" by Knut Hamsun this weekend. Bunch o' freaks in that tale! This is me :fan:, except I'm holding a book instead of a computer.

zaphyre14
06-07-2010, 05:32 PM
While waiting for the next three Falco books to show up in my mailbox, I'm reading "Interred with their Bones" by Jennifer (?) Lee Carroll. Someone reccommended it here, I think, way back (probably Prancer). I like it better than most of the DaVinci Code-style mysteries I've been reading but I'm finding it hard to believe that the narrator has so much in-depth knowledge about Shakespeare's life and political ties just residing on the top of her head so she can lecture her companions over coffee at the drop of a hat. And there is a lot of lecturing... I can't say I'm disappointed with it, though and I may pass it off to another English major friend when I'm done.

As a change of pace, I read Joanna Bourne's "The Spymaster's Lady" on a recent plane flight and liked it enough to pick up her second book as well. There's a time for lusty histoprical romance and for me, planes are the place. :)

Prancer
06-07-2010, 05:42 PM
While waiting for the next three Falco books to show up in my mailbox, I'm reading "Interred with their Bones" by Jennifer (?) Lee Carroll. Someone reccommended it here, I think, way back (probably Prancer).

I read it, but IIRC, I didn't recommend it. :shuffle:

Maybe I'm thinking of a different book. I know it's all about some :rolleyes: Shakespeare conspiracy, which is all good fun and all (but I dread the day someone decides to do a paper on it), but isn't this also the one where the heroine is always hearing the rasp of a steel blade being drawn from its sheath as she runs away from the shadowy killer? The first time she's by the Thames and actually hears it echo? And at some other point she's running around through the stacks at Harvard? And then there's at least one and I think two more occasions where this occurs?

It IS better than the Da Vinci Code, I'll give it that.

rfisher
06-07-2010, 06:08 PM
I read it, but IIRC, I didn't recommend it. :shuffle:

Maybe I'm thinking of a different book. I know it's all about some :rolleyes: Shakespeare conspiracy, which is all good fun and all (but I dread the day someone decides to do a paper on it), but isn't this also the one where the heroine is always hearing the rasp of a steel blade being drawn from its sheath as she runs away from the shadowy killer? The first time she's by the Thames and actually hears it echo? And at some other point she's running around through the stacks at Harvard? And then there's at least one and I think two more occasions where this occurs?

It IS better than the Da Vinci Code, I'll give it that.

Only marginally. :lol: You knew who the killer was really early. I just wanted them to get on with it.

zaphyre14
06-07-2010, 07:37 PM
I read it, but IIRC, I didn't recommend it. :shuffle:

Maybe I'm thinking of a different book. I know it's all about some :rolleyes: Shakespeare conspiracy, which is all good fun and all (but I dread the day someone decides to do a paper on it), but isn't this also the one where the heroine is always hearing the rasp of a steel blade being drawn from its sheath as she runs away from the shadowy killer? The first time she's by the Thames and actually hears it echo? And at some other point she's running around through the stacks at Harvard? And then there's at least one and I think two more occasions where this occurs?

It IS better than the Da Vinci Code, I'll give it that.


That's it. :) Maybe I'm enjoying it a little more because I've been to some of the sites they race through, like Harvard's libraries and the (new) Globe Theatre. Last night I got to the part where they're prying open Shakespeare's tomb, though, which stretched credibility to infinity and beyond. I'm also wondering how these people can get plane tickets (direct flights!) all around the globe at a moment's notice without running into a waitlist or a line of any kind.

But I've read worse. And all the arguments about Shakespeare's identity reminds me of late-night college debates in the dorm lounge when I was supposed to be studying something else. :) Literature fanatics are just as looney as the Kwaniacs and Weir-dos are here. :wall:

immoimeme
06-08-2010, 02:18 PM
So I am almost thru with Hornet's Nest and all I can say is there is Not Enough Salander in it to suit me. She is by far the most interesting character of the lot. HOWEVER I can understand that if the author had been able to complete his 10 book series why he bothered to create all these other somewhat less interesting characters. BUT--I also understand that in a way, the author is using Salander much in similar ways as the characters in the book.

Maybe there is something WOWOWOW at the end of this book?

Prancer
06-08-2010, 02:36 PM
That's it. :) Maybe I'm enjoying it a little more because I've been to some of the sites they race through, like Harvard's libraries and the (new) Globe Theatre.

I found my old post about it and it seems I did recommend it :shuffle: as a beach read in paperback.

It isn't a bad book, but I think that it had a certain paint-by-numbers feel to it and I think the author could do better--although maybe not in the same genre.


I have a book in my TBR pile you might like: The Crossing Places (http://www.amazon.com/Crossing-Places-Ruth-Galloway-Mystery/dp/0547229895) by Ellie Griffiths.

I started this one and already I think a lot of people here might like it. The protagonist is a rather snarky almost 40 year old professor who weighs more than she likes, lives alone and likes it, owns cats, has born-again Christian parents who annoy her by wanting her to be saved........I'm just sayin' :shuffle:

Although zaph, if that tempts you, fair warning--it's written in present tense. :P

zaphyre14
06-08-2010, 06:27 PM
I found my old post about it and it seems I did recommend it :shuffle: as a beach read in paperback.

It isn't a bad book, but I think that it had a certain paint-by-numbers feel to it and I think the author could do better--although maybe not in the same genre.



I started this one and already I think a lot of people here might like it. The protagonist is a rather snarky almost 40 year old professor who weighs more than she likes, lives alone and likes it, owns cats, has born-again Christian parents who annoy her by wanting her to be saved........I'm just sayin' :shuffle:

Although zaph, if that tempts you, fair warning--it's written in present tense. :P

Thank you for the warning; I cannot read present tense books so I'll pass.

Carrell has a sequel to "Interred..." that I'm going to track down. Another Shakespearean mystery with the same heroine - "Haunt Me Still." It's summer and while I'm not going to the beach anytime soon, I can deal with some lazy-mind reading.

immoimeme
06-08-2010, 11:31 PM
I finished Hornet's Nest. Meh. There might as well have been the words "To Be Continued" printed at the end, because it was obvious that was the intention. I wish I hadn't bought this book. It's not a keeper for me.

Prancer
06-09-2010, 03:16 AM
I finished Hornet's Nest. Meh. There might as well have been the words "To Be Continued" printed at the end, because it was obvious that was the intention. I wish I hadn't bought this book. It's not a keeper for me.

Noooooooo! I just bought that one for my summer reading pile!