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rfisher
06-01-2010, 09:05 PM
I always figured her for another Jodi Picoult. I may have to read on of her books. I'll see if the library has any on audio for my trip to AR this weekend. Dark is better than the syrupy sweetness of Picoult. :yikes:

Prancer
06-01-2010, 09:30 PM
What creeps you out?

"In the Warehouse," for one. I don't see it online anywhere. But :scream:. I had dreams about that story for years.

ETA: Try this: http://books.google.com/books?id=gC3djqIMqnIC&pg=PA181&lpg=PA181&dq=Joyce+Carol+Oates+%22In+the+Warehouse%22&source=bl&ots=1SEWCOg2FA&sig=TiW2BeHDQcgyK2Ob_VxddBWlmVc&hl=en&ei=jmwFTP3eJMT_lgfdsYHXBg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=7&ved=0CDEQ6AEwBg#v=onepage&q=Joyce%20Carol%20Oates%20%22In%20the%20Warehouse% 22&f=false

Scroll down past the first page to see the text.

Most of the stories in Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been. Take, for example, the title story (http://jco.usfca.edu/works/wgoing/text.html).


I always figured her for another Jodi Picoult. I may have to read on of her books. I'll see if the library has any on audio for my trip to AR this weekend. Dark is better than the syrupy sweetness of Picoult. :yikes:

Picoult writes popular books; Oates writes dense, dark literary works that are often about evil and violence and twisted lives. Not always, but often.

IceAlisa
06-01-2010, 11:09 PM
"In the Warehouse," for one. I don't see it online anywhere. But :scream:. I had dreams about that story for years.

ETA: Try this: http://books.google.com/books?id=gC3djqIMqnIC&pg=PA181&lpg=PA181&dq=Joyce+Carol+Oates+%22In+the+Warehouse%22&source=bl&ots=1SEWCOg2FA&sig=TiW2BeHDQcgyK2Ob_VxddBWlmVc&hl=en&ei=jmwFTP3eJMT_lgfdsYHXBg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=7&ved=0CDEQ6AEwBg#v=onepage&q=Joyce%20Carol%20Oates%20%22In%20the%20Warehouse% 22&f=false

Scroll down past the first page to see the text.

Most of the stories in Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been. Take, for example, the title story (http://jco.usfca.edu/works/wgoing/text.html).


Thanks for the links. I read Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been . In The Warehouse is only partially available.

Cree-eepy. But very good and demonstrates another facet in her talent. Although there are plenty of adjectives in Where Are You Going..., the clipped rhythm reminds me of Hemingway.

Blonde creates a different impression in terms of style, particularly the stream of consciousness chapters. I am not a particular fan of the stream of consciousness but I really liked this.

ETA: check out what I found on Wiki:

Oates taught in Beaumont, Texas for a year before moving to Detroit in 1962, where she began teaching at the University of Detroit. Influenced by the Vietnam war, the 1967 Detroit race riots, and a job offer, in 1968 Oates moved with her husband to teaching positions at the University of Windsor, Canada.[3] In 1978, she moved to Princeton and began teaching at Princeton University.
In 1995, Princeton undergraduate Jonathan Safran Foer took an introductory writing course with Oates,[16] who took an interest in Foer's writing, telling him that he had "that most important of writerly qualities, energy".[17] Foer later recalled that "she was the first person to ever make me think I should try to write in any sort of serious way. And my life really changed after that."[17] Oates served as the advisor to Foer's senior thesis, an early version of his novel Everything Is Illuminated, which was published to wide acclaim in 1999.

shells
06-01-2010, 11:42 PM
I once tried to read a book by Oates and didn't get past the second chapter. Listening to all this discussion about her it makes me glad I decided to give up on it. :)

I started The Girl Who Kicked The Hornets Nest this morning. I'm glad it picked up where The Girl Who Played With Fire left off. I'm pretty sure I'd have been bummed not knowing how that turned out.

Prancer
06-02-2010, 12:21 AM
In The Warehouse is only partially available.

I believe the entire story is there. I can't find a copy of it anywhere, but I think that's it, as long as what you see starts out with Ronnie being a big girl and the narrator being a skinny little dark one, and ending with the narrator wanting to write stories for television.

IceAlisa
06-02-2010, 12:30 AM
After a few pages it turns into another story by a different writer. It says "pages 186-190 are not shown in this preview." Then it goes straight to page 191.

rjblue
06-02-2010, 12:31 AM
:( In memory of Jeanne Robinson (RIP), I may just re-read Stardance, and maybe some of the Callaghans Saloon short stories.Aww, poor Spider. They seemed like such a devoted couple

Prancer
06-02-2010, 02:40 AM
I once tried to read a book by Oates and didn't get past the second chapter. Listening to all this discussion about her it makes me glad I decided to give up on it. :)

She's definitely not for everyone.


After a few pages it turns into another story by a different writer. It says "pages 186-190 are not shown in this preview." Then it goes straight to page 191.

Weird. I can see pages 182-188, which is the whole story.

Google Books does strange things like that.

Oh, well. I guess I will have my nightmares alone :P.

Of course, I'm reading The Secret Speech (http://www.amazon.com/Child-44-Tom-Rob-Smith/dp/0446402389), the sequel to Child 44. The first was about an MGB agent chasing a serial killer who murders children in Stalin-era Russia, the sequel about the same (now former) MGB agent being stalked by someone he wronged while participating in the Stalinist purges. I probably won't lose a wink over it, but that "Warehouse" story--:scream:.

rfisher
06-02-2010, 02:43 AM
She's definitely not for everyone.



Weird. I can see pages 182-188, which is the whole story.

Google Books does strange things like that.

Oh, well. I guess I will have my nightmares alone :P.

Of course, I'm reading The Secret Speech (http://www.amazon.com/Child-44-Tom-Rob-Smith/dp/0446402389), the sequel to Child 44. The first was about an MGB agent chasing a serial killer who murders children in Stalin-era Russia, the sequel about the same (now former) MGB agent being stalked by someone he wronged while participating in the Stalinist purges. I probably won't lose a wink over it, but that "Warehouse" story--:scream:.

More disturbing than Chelsie Cain's stuff? I couldn't read the 3rd book. The relationship with Archie was freaking me out.

PrincessLeppard
06-02-2010, 02:46 AM
Of course, I'm reading The Secret Speech (http://www.amazon.com/Child-44-Tom-Rob-Smith/dp/0446402389), the sequel to Child 44. The first was about an MGB agent chasing a serial killer who murders children in Stalin-era Russia, the sequel about the same (now former) MGB agent being stalked by someone he wronged while participating in the Stalinist purges. I probably won't lose a wink over it, but that "Warehouse" story--:scream:.

I liked Child 44, but there were some definite :scream: parts in that book. Made worse in that many of them were true.

Let me know how the sequel is.

IceAlisa
06-02-2010, 03:28 AM
Weird. I can see pages 182-188, which is the whole story.

Google Books does strange things like that.

Tried it on the desktop and can see the whole thing which I will now read.

ETA: read it. It did come out of the left field although the power shift was explicit (but sudden). For some reason The Warehouse did not creep me out as much as the first one.

Overall, I'd say I prefer her writing in the novel I am reading (Blonde) to these stories. We will see if that stands once I get to the other novels.

Evilynn
06-02-2010, 02:50 PM
Prolific doesn't begin to describe it. She's a distance runner; she works out her stories while she runs, then writes--IN LONGHAND--for hours every day. She used to keep detailed journals on top of everything else, too, but I think she's abandoned that.

I can read only so much Oates at a time, which is why I prefer her short stories. I think most of her novels drag at points, and there's just soooooo much darkness in her work.

Yikes! I know Neil Gaiman writes all his stuff in longhand too, but he's no way near as prolific.

I tend to prefer Margaret Atwood and Doris Lessing over Oates, but I read one of her books every other year or so. I usually don't mind darkness, but sometimes she's fantastically bleak.


What's that about and what is the reading challenge on Goodreads?

Sundiver (http://www.amazon.com/Sundiver-Uplift-Saga-Book-1/dp/0553269828/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1275486367&sr=8-1)is the first part of an SF series that I picked up ages ago and never got around to reading. So far it's a little clunky, so I'm not sure if I'm going to bother reading the other 2 parts. We'll see.

The challenge (http://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/333026-the-short-cool-summer-challenge) I'm looking at is for the Dark Fiction group. It's 28 books for 25 different tasks in 3 months, and I don't think I'm going to complete it, but it seemed like a good way to take a break from "must read all unread works of fiction I own", which has been my reading goal the last year and a half. :)

John 3 17
06-03-2010, 01:03 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kurt_Wallander

PBS Mystery! started showing Wallender episodes last year, with Kenneth Branagh as Wallender.

What is GWTDT? Something Twilight related?

ETA: It seems that Henning Mankell, author of the Wallender series, was on one those ships headed to Gaza and is now in Israeli custody.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5itzm1SrvreI2fs5d_rszMgzTt6iQ

I'll be sure never to buy one of his books, then. Thanks for the info.

John 3 17
06-03-2010, 01:11 AM
I've been reading Common Sense by Thomas Paine and next up is the Federalist Papers that I was thrilled to find for $0.44 at my thrift store :D I find reading it is interesting since I just wrapped up reading dozens of books from the Georgian & Regency period of England. The language is the same and sometimes it's amusing.

-Bridget :)

jeffisjeff
06-03-2010, 01:33 AM
I'll be sure never to buy one of his books, then. Thanks for the info.

:rolleyes: