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View Full Version : So Many Books, So Little Time (The Reading Thread)



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Wyliefan
05-15-2010, 12:23 PM
Nope. Who Killed My Daughter? (http://www.amazon.com/Who-Killed-Daughter-Lois-Duncan/dp/0440213428) is nonfiction. Part of me is aghast that my tutee is reading it, the other part of me keeps remembering what I read when I was 12.

That would have been my sister -- she was crazy about true crime books. Still is. :) My mom filed it in the "at least she's reading something" category -- not that she would have wanted her to read anything and everything that was out there, but true crime wasn't as bad as some of what she could have been reading.



Currently I'm finishing off a bio of Thomas More and his daughter Margaret Roper called "A Daughter's Love" by John Guy. An interesting story about two Tudor era figures who led interesting and tragic lives. And it's good to read about some non-royal Tudor people for a change.

I have that, just haven't read it yet. It looks really good. Glad to hear the recommendation.

rfisher
05-15-2010, 04:25 PM
I got one of Joanne Fluke's books on audio from the library. I wouldn't buy one of them, but I've listened to everything the little local branch has to offer. They are so sweet they make my teeth hurt. I have to go read some LK Hamilton to counter the sugar high.

Evilynn
05-16-2010, 09:49 AM
Anyone has read Joyce Carol Oates' "Blonde", a fictional bio of Marylin Monroe? Apparently, a movie is being made based on this, with Naomi Watts as MM.

'Blonde' is one of the best Oates books I've read. It's one hell of a big book though, my copy is close to 1000 pages. CBS did a mini series based on it in 2001, but apparently they didn't address the possibility that Monroe might've been assassinated at all.


Now, I love Naomi Watts but I think she is miscast.

ITA.

I finished The Year of the Flood, and I'm glad I reread Oryx & Crake before I started on it, since they intertwined more and more as the novel wore on. I'm also quite glad tYotF didn't completely negate the end of O&C. Neither tYotF or O&C are quite as good as The Handmaid's Tale, but both were still excellent books.

I've now moved on to a book by Peter Hoeg (of "Smilla's Sense of Snow" fame. Never read Smilla though), The Quiet Girl (http://www.amazon.com/Quiet-Girl-Novel-Peter-Hoeg/dp/0312427778/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1273998951&sr=8-2) (Den stille pige). The premise is of a man who can hear the tones emitted by people, and a girl he comes across who is completely silent. I quite liked The Woman and the Ape way back when I read it for Danish class, so I thought I'd give it a go, although I have to admit I got a Swedish translation instead of finding out just how much Danish I've forgotten. :shuffle:

walei
05-16-2010, 05:20 PM
Need a recommendation from people here:

I was cleaning my place and found a book my class read in the 7th grade called 'Agouhanna'. It's a novel in the Native American setting and I really enjoyed reading it.

Does anyone have any recommendations on novels about Native Americans? I'm especially interested in the spiritual/folklore aspects of Native Americans instead of than the European colonizations that it was so focused on in school back in the days...

PDilemma
05-16-2010, 05:52 PM
Novels I can't help you with. But for non-fiction, there are a lot of great titles:

On the Rez (Frazier)

Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee (Brown)

The Way to Rainy Mountain (Momaday)

And most anything by Vine Deloria.

rfisher
05-16-2010, 05:56 PM
Need a recommendation from people here:

I was cleaning my place and found a book my class read in the 7th grade called 'Agouhanna'. It's a novel in the Native American setting and I really enjoyed reading it.

Does anyone have any recommendations on novels about Native Americans? I'm especially interested in the spiritual/folklore aspects of Native Americans instead of than the European colonizations that it was so focused on in school back in the days...

You might be interested in the novels by Kathleen and Michael Gear. There are a number of them and deal with Native Americans from the paleoindian era up to European contact. Both are archaeologists and the archaeological background information is accurate given the creative licensing they took for a work of fiction. They include a lot of spiritual/folklore.

If you're really interested in Native American folklore, you might try American Indian Myths and Legends an edited volume by Richard Erdoes and Alfonso Ortiz. It's published by Pantheon.

All the titles listed by PDilemma deal with modern tribal events.

PDilemma
05-16-2010, 06:02 PM
All the titles listed by PDilemma deal with modern tribal events.

If you want to learn about Native Spirituality, every single one of those titles contains a lot of info told in a compelling way.

kuhli
05-16-2010, 06:54 PM
Does anyone have any recommendations on novels about Native Americans?

Leslie Marmon Silko, Louise Erdrich, and Sherman Alexie are the best authors on Native Americans I've read, although their works are mostly set in modern times. Alexie's novels are OK but his short story collection, "The Toughest Indian in the World," is amazing. I highly recommend Silko's "Ceremony" (20th century setting) and "Gardens in the Dunes (19th century)."


I was also really impressed by Catharine Maria Sedgewick's "Hope Leslie, or, Early times in Massachusetts", published in the early 1800s, though it focuses more on political/cultural issues than spiritual ones.

Multnomah Public Library has a list of Native American Fiction authors (http://www.multcolib.org/books/lists/NatAmerWriters.pdf).

IceAlisa
05-16-2010, 07:19 PM
'Blonde' is one of the best Oates books I've read. It's one hell of a big book though, my copy is close to 1000 pages. CBS did a mini series based on it in 2001, but apparently they didn't address the possibility that Monroe might've been assassinated at all.

Thanks! Any other Oates books you (and other FSUers) could recommend? I have The Gravedigger's Daughter on my shelf, awaiting its turn.

WRT Marylin Monroe's death: I've read an article written by the pathologist who performed the autopsy on her. (It was in Playboy years ago--yes, Playboy has fantastic articles by the best writers and minds: Thomas Friedman, Camille Paglia and many others. It also has pictures of what I am convinced is the same woman over and over again...)

Anyway, what he described pointed to a likelihood of an assassination. The following are the details that some may find graphic:

He talked about either a narcotic or a barbiturate or an anti-anxiety med that was taken by mouth to put her to sleep. Or perhaps it was chloral hydrate--I don't remember.

He also mentioned severe discoloration and abnormality of the her rectum and sigmoid colon. He stated that in his opinion she was given an enema of the barbiturate that killed her, in part. His reasoning was, why kill yourself with an enema?

rfisher
05-16-2010, 08:18 PM
If you want to learn about Native Spirituality, every single one of those titles contains a lot of info told in a compelling way.

The OP requested novels that focused on pre-contact eras which is what I gave her. They also requested novels that dealt with folklore which is what I gave her. I simply pointed out the other titles dealt with the modern era which is most certainly post-contact.

PDilemma
05-16-2010, 08:36 PM
The OP requested novels that focused on pre-contact eras which is what I gave her. They also requested novels that dealt with folklore which is what I gave her. I simply pointed out the other titles dealt with the modern era which is most certainly post-contact.

I was not offended, nor was I trying to offend you. :rolleyes:

walei
05-17-2010, 02:59 AM
Thanks everyone for all of the suggestions I will look into them!

Southpaw
05-17-2010, 03:05 AM
Thanks! Any other Oates books you (and other FSUers) could recommend? I have The Gravedigger's Daughter on my shelf, awaiting its turn.

I started TGD but it had to go back to the library before I could finish it and it was already a month overdue by that time so I was too embarrassed to renew the lease so I dropped it in the box and ran. Don't ask. :shuffle:

I really enjoyed what I got through. Maybe I'll summon up the courage and go check it out again now that enough time has passed. Would love to finish it.

PrincessLeppard
05-17-2010, 03:56 AM
So I picked up a book called Inside Stalin's Archives, because I thought it might be really interesting. I mean, Stalin's sekret stuff? :sekret: Right?

So far it's mainly about the author's trip to Russia and how awesome he is. Sigh.

Matryeshka
05-17-2010, 04:12 AM
I just finished Zeitoun by Dave Eggers, which is a biography about a Muslim family in the aftermath of Katrina. I've been meaning to read it for a long time, but somehow, I never got around to it. It was very, very, very good. Anyone interested in civil rights issues should give it a read.

Off to start the new Patricia Briggs novel, which will hopefully be better than the latest Sookie Stackhouse. Though to be fair, I think Charlaine Harris dug herself into a hole with the last one, and she didn't have a lot of places to go in this one. The last one was too depressing and too WTF, and this one was too introspective and not enough action. I also wonder:

It surprised me that Arlene wasn't mentioned AT ALL. Not even in passing. I mean, her best friend tried to MURDER her, or knowingly abetted an attempt to murder her, and it was like it never existed. Jason has a new girlfriend, and the werepanthers I guess are just OK with that and doing there thing in Hotshot. Oh, and at the very end Claudine's angry lover kind of shows up? I mean, WTF? And Alexei Romanov--did Harris read a book on Russian history while writing this and decide to incorporate it? Just insanity without point. I hope though in the next one she goes back to vampire stuff with Victor and co. It's not that I don't enjoy the other supes sometimes, but I think she's better at vamp drama/politics than she is at fairies and weres. And let's face it--most of us are reading it for hot, kinky vampire sex & shenanigans. More snarky, powerful Eric! Less fairies and whiny, boring Eric! :mitchell: