PDA

View Full Version : So Many Books, So Little Time (The Reading Thread)



Pages : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 [48] 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67

star_gazer11
04-13-2010, 03:01 AM
I finished the Margaret of Ashbury trilogy with the last book The Water Devil, by Judith Merkle Riley. This one seemed funnier than the others :), although it's been a while since I read the other books.

Matryeshka
04-13-2010, 03:03 AM
Finished Sense and Sensibilities and Sea Monsters. Not anywhere nearly as good as Pride and Prejudice and Zombies.

On to try #2 for The Swan Thieves.

shells
04-13-2010, 03:08 AM
I finished re-reading Good in Bed today. I don't think I've read the sequel, though the preview in the back of the book makes me think I have. (Maybe I didn't finish it?) So I need to see if I can find it at Walmart (they had all of Jennifer Weiner's books on sale for $9 a while back...which is cheaper than the bookstore).

Next will probably be The Reckoning by Kelley Armstrong, which is the third in a teen trilogy I got hooked on while I was working at the bookstore (I read them because the author came to the store and did an event when the second book released).

zaphyre14
04-13-2010, 02:37 PM
I finished the Falco mystery - and will be hunting for more in the series. Falco's a hoot.

I've now jumped era's to Arthurian Britain with J.M.C Blair's "The Pendragon Murders" in which Merlin is the detective. I read and enjoyed "The Lancelot Murders" last year so I'm hoping this one will be good too.

PDilemma
04-13-2010, 02:42 PM
I can't stand Jennifer Weiner. Her books all seem to communicate one twisted message:

"Fat chicks good. Skinny chicks evil."

Whatever. I hardly think humanity can be so easily classified. That message existed a bit in Bridget Jones, but Helen Fielding carried it off with humor so it all seemed rather tongue-in-cheek. Not so much with Weiner.

I'm reading Nick Hornby right now, Juliet, Naked. Very intriguing so far.

Fergus
04-13-2010, 07:59 PM
Maeve Haran's The Lady and the Poet (John Donne) and Vanora Bennett's The Queen's Lover (Catherine of France and Owain Tudor).

My non-fic this week is MacCulloch's The Reformation: A History.

Oxhead
04-13-2010, 11:59 PM
I just finished (and highly recommend) 'The Postmistress' set in Cape Cod and London during the blitz before US entered the war. So many stories interwoven, and done well.

I also just finished 'Let the Great World Spin' which I enjoyed as well. Set in NYC during the Vietnam War era, it's a truly poignant story of how everything is transitory as various lives intersect under the high wire theatrics of artist (Phillipe Petite from France) at the top of the World Trade Center twin towers.

As a side point, there is a great documentary film on Phillipe (who is not the center of this book I recommend, just a backdrop) called 'Man on Wire', that is a nail-biter, especially for those of us who have a fear of heights. He actually danced and ran and lay down on a cable he had secretly strung between the twin towers in the 70s. Amazing film!

Thanks for the good reads listed in here. I've made my list!

Wyliefan
04-14-2010, 12:03 AM
I am currently working my way through The Portable Dorothy Parker, which is actually an expanded edition, because it has the original Portable, plus other writings she did.



I have two different editions of that. Each of them has material the other doesn't, so I have to keep them both! :) I love her work. In addition to the stories and poems and so forth, she's one of the best critics, if not the best, that I've ever read.

Grannyfan
04-14-2010, 12:10 AM
I'm finishing up a really entertaining book, The Final Confession of Mabel Stark, a novel based on the life of the woman who had a famous act with her trained tigers during the golden days of the circus. Her life story is something, plus there's lots of inside stuff about how the circus works, or worked, when it was the biggest thing in entertainment and the Ringling brothers were among the richest men in America.

I read somewhere that there was a movie in the works with Kate Winslet, to be directed by her husband. Not sure what the status is now since their breakup. I like Kate Winslet, but after reading the book, I'm not sure she's right for the part of Mabel.

Anyway, it's a fun read and I recommend it.

AxelAnnie
04-14-2010, 12:24 AM
I just finished 'The Help' by Kathryn Stockett. It was excellent. It wasn't at all what I expected--a completely different read on the racial climate in the '60's in Mississippi. I couldn't put it down and suggest reading it. It was entertaining and eye-opening.

Just finished it too..........thought it was absolutely wonderful. I ordered it one night (on my Kindle) 'cause I was desperate...............I was so surprised I found the intertwining stories so compelling.

IceAlisa
04-14-2010, 06:13 AM
Came upon the French titles for the Girl Who Series.

The girl with the dragon tattoo-Les hommes qui n'aimaient pas les femmes-Men who don't like (hate?) women
The girl who played with fire-La fille qui rêvait d'un bidon d'essence et d'une allumette-The girl who dreamed of a can of gasoline and a match. (Now there's a mouthful!)

The girl who kicked the hornets' nest-La Reine dans le palais des courants d'air-The queen in the palace of drafts

I am wondering if
(a) the French titles correspond to the Swedish ones and
(b) if someone could comment how the publishers decide which title goes to which country.

Prancer
04-14-2010, 07:01 AM
I am wondering if
(a) the French titles correspond to the Swedish ones and
(b) if someone could comment how the publishers decide which title goes to which country.

I believe that Men Who Hate Women was the original Swedish title of Dragon Tattoo; I don't know about the others.

Publishers decide on title changes based on marketing. I have no idea why the title was changed, but I would bet that the original title was deemed too much like a self-help book title.

ETA: No, apparently it was believed that people in English-speaking countries would find the title offensive.

Evilynn
04-14-2010, 09:12 AM
Came upon the French titles for the Girl Who Series.

The girl with the dragon tattoo-Les hommes qui n'aimaient pas les femmes-Men who don't like (hate?) women
The girl who played with fire-La fille qui rêvait d'un bidon d'essence et d'une allumette-The girl who dreamed of a can of gasoline and a match. (Now there's a mouthful!)

The girl who kicked the hornets' nest-La Reine dans le palais des courants d'air-The queen in the palace of drafts

I am wondering if
(a) the French titles correspond to the Swedish ones and
(b) if someone could comment how the publishers decide which title goes to which country.

The Swedish titles + translation:
1. Män som hatar kvinnor - Men who hate women
2. Flickan som lekte med elden - The girl who played with fire
3. Luftslottet som sprängdes - The "air castle" that blew up. A "luftslott" ("air castle") is a fantastic daydream/fantasy that isn't grounded in reality. Say, if Viktoria Helgesson said she'd win the olympics, that'd be a luftslott. ;)

In some instances I know "less offensive" titles are chosen. Which is what I suppose happened to book #1 (and the Swedish movie "Fcucking Åmål" which got called "Show Me Love" in the American market. :lol:), and sometimes the titles simply don't translate well, like book #3.

shells
04-14-2010, 12:40 PM
I can't stand Jennifer Weiner. Her books all seem to communicate one twisted message:

"Fat chicks good. Skinny chicks evil."

Whatever. I hardly think humanity can be so easily classified. That message existed a bit in Bridget Jones, but Helen Fielding carried it off with humor so it all seemed rather tongue-in-cheek. Not so much with Weiner.

I didn't get that out of Good In Bed so much, maybe in In Her Shoes (though it's been a long time since I read that one). But, in GIB the root of the problem really seemed more about her dysfunctional family than anything else. It was more that deadbeat dads were evil, and really that's kind of hard to argue.

rfisher
04-14-2010, 11:51 PM
I'm listening to Dracula: The Undead in the car. The narrator is fantastic and you get totally caught up in the story then the authors abruptly switch to pages of exposition. I know they based the story, albeit loosely, on some of Bram Stoker's notes, but I can't believe their editor didn't do a better job with the novel's flow. The factual backstory on Stoker, who is written into the novel as himself, is interesting, especially his history with Oscar Wilde, but it would have been better as an afterward. You don't write a scary, intense chapter about the vampire then give pages of blah, blah, blah. The authors should have actually read Dracula and understood how to build and keep suspense. They got the build part, but totally missed the keep.