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View Full Version : So Many Books, So Little Time (The Reading Thread)



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IceAlisa
04-05-2010, 07:01 AM
Yes, I want to find out what happens to her in the end. But will we? I understand this was to be a 10 volume work and we only get the first 3. We will of course get to know something about the events in book 2 but I don't expect a complete denouement as Larsson meant to continue the series.


I can stretch suspension of disbelief until you can see through it, but one of the things that makes Salander appealing is that she has such an unusual combination of vulnerability and sociopathic tendencies. Making her into some sort of superhuman being negates the former, which she desperately needs to balance out the latter.
I think her character is the key to the success of the series.

Fergus
04-05-2010, 01:39 PM
Oh, and I also read Jane Bites Back. It was cute as a stand alone book; I don't think I'll continue with the series, though.

Cute is the perfect word for it.

I actually think Ford did a better job with this than with the gay romances he usually churns out, they're always so earnest and epic and ultimately predictable.

Though I must admit I didn't know vampires liked red wine and dark chocolate so much. ;)

Matryeshka
04-05-2010, 09:26 PM
Currently, I'm reading The Broom of the System by David Foster Wallace. So far, it has just made me very annoyed. There's something very smug and condescending about it all. I'm not sure I'm hip-nerdy-cool-smart enough to "get it", and I'm not sure I want to be. At this point, I don't care if Lenore is a "real" person or not. If you have time to wonder about such ridiculousness, you need a hobby.

And since when is there a desert in Ohio? :confused:

I decided to give "high literature" another try after reading The White Tiger, which I enjoyed immensely. It's not often I root for a murderer...and at the same time being totally turned off by the same character. :lol:

Prancer
04-06-2010, 12:04 AM
And since when is there a desert in Ohio? :confused:

Perhaps it's a metaphor? :lol:

Wyliefan
04-06-2010, 04:47 AM
All I know is, A Tale of Two Cities is one of my all-time, top ten, favorite books.


It's my favorite novel. Which is why I wrote a very huffy blog post about that piece when it first came out. :D

IceAlisa
04-06-2010, 07:35 AM
A while ago I picked up The Commoner by John Burnham Schwartz for $3.99 out of a sale bin. I am intrigued by the fact that this is supposed to be a roman clef and that the subject, the Empress Michiko is still living.

The novel is written in first person, from the Empress' standpoint and so far, a 100 pages in, I still cannot get a clear impression of what sort of person she is. Perhaps it's because the author himself doesn't know?

Has anyone read it? What did you think?

I will be reading this while I wait for my friend to finish The Girl Who Kicked The Hornet's Nest which she ordered from amazon UK and will loan to me when she is done.

Evilynn
04-06-2010, 10:37 AM
Finished 'Love, Again' (which continued to be relatively easy to read, and quite funny in places, even if the story is about as depressing as the other books of Lessing I've read) and moved on to 'The Golden Notebook' (yes, I had a fair amount of Doris Lessing sitting on my unread shelf. :lol: ). I got stuck 1/3 from the end of the book of Swedish folk tales, mostly because I get more and more annoyed by the folkloric expert's notes at the end of each tale. I now remember who the man who wrote them are, and that I've never liked him. :wall:

Fergus
04-06-2010, 03:46 PM
A while ago I picked up The Commoner by John Burnham Schwartz...Has anyone read it? What did you think?

My favorite aspect of the book was the portrayal of mid-20th century upper class Japanese domesticity, a milieu I have rarely encountered in English language books.

zaphyre14
04-07-2010, 03:48 PM
I'm currently reasing Lindsey Davis' Shadow in Bronze" one of a series of Roman Empire mysteries featuring Marcu Didius Falco in his job as "informer" to Caesar Vespasian. A grumbling, bumbling Columbo-style detective, Falco tickles my fancy with his running commentaries on Roman society and politics in the course of his investigation of a political plot to replace Vespasian with someone of higher social class. For a smart guy, though, Falco can be amazingly dense - I figured out the cause of his girlfriend's testiness in Chapter Three while he remains blind to the idea of it completely and I'm almost at at the end.

rfisher
04-07-2010, 04:18 PM
I love Falco. I really enjoyed the audio books available for the series.

I'm listening to the Bootlegger's Daughter. It's good so far. I'm reading Death of a Cozy Writer which is cracking me up. It would make a great movie.

skatingfan5
04-07-2010, 04:24 PM
Finished 'Love, Again' (which continued to be relatively easy to read, and quite funny in places, even if the story is about as depressing as the other books of Lessing I've read) and moved on to 'The Golden Notebook' (yes, I had a fair amount of Doris Lessing sitting on my unread shelf. :lol: ). I read The Golden Notebook years ago -- and have been meaning to re-read it for at least 5 years now. Maybe I'll do it this summer -- or not. :lol:
I got stuck 1/3 from the end of the book of Swedish folk tales, mostly because I get more and more annoyed by the folkloric expert's notes at the end of each tale. I now remember who the man who wrote them are, and that I've never liked him. :wall:Just ignore his annoying :COP: notes and read the folk tales -- stick a post-it over them if you have too. :D

IceAlisa
04-07-2010, 04:27 PM
My favorite aspect of the book was the portrayal of mid-20th century upper class Japanese domesticity, a milieu I have rarely encountered in English language books.

But is the portrayal authentic? I am wary of fake Japanese cultural descriptions since Memoirs of a Geisha.

Next up for me is Salman Rushdie's The Enchantress of Florence.

Fergus
04-07-2010, 07:50 PM
But is the portrayal authentic? I am wary of fake Japanese cultural descriptions since Memoirs of a Geisha.

I pulled some modern Japanese history books at work today, but they don't cover too many aspects of domestic culture. :(

FiveRinger
04-08-2010, 12:47 AM
I just finished 'The Help' by Kathryn Stockett. It was excellent. It wasn't at all what I expected--a completely different read on the racial climate in the '60's in Mississippi. I couldn't put it down and suggest reading it. It was entertaining and eye-opening.

rfisher
04-08-2010, 01:43 AM
JKR is hinting she'll have another book out soon and that there may well be more HP :cheer2: There are those 15 years to account for.