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Rex
04-01-2010, 01:45 AM
My favorites are Firefly Summer, Circle of Friends and Quentin's. Evening Class is very good, too.

I'll look for these. I did see Minnie Drivers' film version of Circle....good movie.

Prancer
04-01-2010, 04:59 AM
Ten Books That Should Be Fired From the Canon (http://thesecondpass.com/?p=1663)

Posted mostly because it includes two books that have been discussed in this thread (The Road and A Tale of Two Cities) and because I absolutely must share this with someone who finds the first paragraph about The Rainbow as funny as I do.

Anyone? Anyone? Anyone at all???

IceAlisa
04-01-2010, 05:19 AM
Ten Books That Should Be Fired From the Canon (http://thesecondpass.com/?p=1663)

Posted mostly because it includes two books that have been discussed in this thread (The Road and A Tale of Two Cities) and because I absolutely must share this with someone who finds the first paragraph about The Rainbow as funny as I do.

Anyone? Anyone? Anyone at all???

*raises hand*

John 3 17
04-01-2010, 09:39 AM
Ten Books That Should Be Fired From the Canon (http://thesecondpass.com/?p=1663)

Posted mostly because it includes two books that have been discussed in this thread (The Road and A Tale of Two Cities) and because I absolutely must share this with someone who finds the first paragraph about The Rainbow as funny as I do.

Anyone? Anyone? Anyone at all???

All I know is, A Tale of Two Cities is one of my all-time, top ten, favorite books. It takes one on such a journey of emotions, history, and intrigue. It has one of the most inspiring, selfless, noblest of endings. The description of the noises at the guillotine reminds me of the musicality of a Poe poem; I can actually hear the drums. Sydney Carton is one remarkable hero: a rascal who redeems himself in an extraordinary way. I wept and wept after reading it feeling both depressed and uplifted at the same time. IMO, it is a masterpiece.

The Ronald Coleman movie version, I think, lives up to the book quite well and I'm usually not content with movie versions of my favorite books.

Ahhhh, think I'll have to read this again soon!

-Bridget :)

rfisher
04-01-2010, 12:09 PM
Ten Books That Should Be Fired From the Canon (http://thesecondpass.com/?p=1663)

Posted mostly because it includes two books that have been discussed in this thread (The Road and A Tale of Two Cities) and because I absolutely must share this with someone who finds the first paragraph about The Rainbow as funny as I do.

Anyone? Anyone? Anyone at all???

Me! Me! Even better, all those were already on my do not bother with list! Life is too short and I too am already bored. My mind is as expanded as I want it to be and now it's all about me.

PDilemma
04-01-2010, 01:09 PM
As someone who has taught A Tale of Two Cities...I must disagree with the writer on one point:

I did not teach it to high school kids because I love it. I was FORCED to.

I can't stand it. I tell the kids "This is not on my list of favorites; you may like it. You may not like it. That's okay because we all have different tastes in literature." This is a controversial approach since the standard is for English teachers to pretend we love love love love love and love some more every single piece of literature we teach. But I have found that teens find a new sense of freedom in life when told literature is like everything else...people have different tastes. And some of them like Tale of Two Cities. They like the whole thing where every minor character comes back and is important at the end. The exact thing that irritates me about the book! Well, that and golden Lucy. Worst. Character. Ever.

MOIJTO
04-01-2010, 01:15 PM
I did not teach it to high school kids because I love it. I was FORCED to.


Forced? Whoa, this certainly supports the theory that our schools brainwash kids...No?

Fergus
04-01-2010, 03:08 PM
Ten Books That Should Be Fired From the Canon (http://thesecondpass.com/?p=1663)

Bye-bye White Noise! Yet another college assignment. Although sucking beyond belief on so many levels, IMHO, the most annoying aspect was the protagonist's wife, Babette.

Prancer
04-01-2010, 03:34 PM
Forced? Whoa, this certainly supports the theory that our schools brainwash kids...No?

No. When you teach lit, you sometimes have to teach lit you don't like. Even I do, and I get to select my own works. Personal taste and pedagogicial purpose are often two different things. I absolutely loathe Greek mythology, but that doesn't mean I get to pretend it doesn't exist.

History teachers don't get to skip over historic periods they find dull. Math teachers have to drill kids in multiplication tables whether they like it or not. Science teachers have to teach dissection whether they like it or not. And English teachers have to teach grammar rules and literature they don't like.

It's part of the job.


Bye-bye White Noise! Yet another college assignment. Although sucking beyond belief on so many levels, IMHO, the most annoying aspect was the protagonist's wife, Babette.

I thought I would love White Noise, but :scream:.

Cheylana
04-01-2010, 08:04 PM
Haha, now I feel better about hating One Hundred Years of Solitude (I gave up on that book pretty quickly).

White Noise looks just like the kind of book I would hate. Stanley Kubrick in print. Blech!

emason
04-01-2010, 11:46 PM
Haha, now I feel better about hating One Hundred Years of Solitude (I gave up on that book pretty quickly).



Not so quickly as I did, I bet. I don't think I got beyond Page 10.

IceAlisa
04-05-2010, 01:51 AM
So I finished The Girl Who Played With Fire. Prancer didn't lie.

SPOILER AHEAD!!!!




Seriously??? Seriously??? A person with multiple gunshot wounds, including one in the brain digs themselves out of a grave, whacks someone with an axe and only then considers collapsing, from I don't know, loss of blood, inability to move injured limbs and oh yes, that bullet in the brain. Aha, sure.

This is just a cherry on top of the multiple holes and improbable plot points that swarm TGWPWF. As a sequel it's a definite letdown.
However, I think Salander is an interesting enough character to get me to buy the third book. So much misfortune and injustice happening to one person--you just can't help but root for her.

IceAlisa
04-05-2010, 02:01 AM
Oh good, someone else doesn't like One Hundred Years of Solitude. Love this paragraph:

Magical realism wasn’t much of a trick to begin with – Gabriel García Márquez riding round in circles on a smallish tricycle, cigarillo clamped between teeth, occasionally raising his panama for people to throw coins – and is now thoroughly clapped out. Also, people who like it seem to have little or no sense of humor. No one knows why, but it’s true. Instead it inspires a sort of insufferably pious stupefaction. Perhaps if you were to read Solitude, you too would be borne aloft on its miraculous wings, transported by its spellbinding portrait of a world which is part exotic paradise, part nightmare, etc., etc., etc., but I wouldn’t risk it.
:respec:

I did enjoy Love In The Time Of Cholera though.

PrincessLeppard
04-05-2010, 02:19 AM
I stayed up until 1 am last night to finish Game Change. Highly recommended. :)

Oh, and I also read Jane Bites Back. It was cute as a stand alone book; I don't think I'll continue with the series, though.

Prancer
04-05-2010, 03:05 AM
So I finished The Girl Who Played With Fire. Prancer didn't lie.

:lol:


I think Salander is an interesting enough character to get me to buy the third book.

Yes, I want to find out what happens to her in the end. But it was touch and go there for a while after reading the ending of that one, let me tell you, and I am only buying the book because I can pick up the hardback for 80% off.

I can stretch suspension of disbelief until you can see through it, but one of the things that makes Salander appealing is that she has such an unusual combination of vulnerability and sociopathic tendencies. Making her into some sort of superhuman being negates the former, which she desperately needs to balance out the latter.