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PrincessLeppard
03-10-2010, 07:43 PM
What sort of sick mind would come up with something like that--and then make someone else read it?

:EVILLE:

silverstars
03-11-2010, 01:27 AM
This is an old one, but I'm reading Kerouac's On the Road for one of my classes. I've never read it before. and it's awesome so far--I highly recommend it if you haven't gotten to it already.

rfisher
03-11-2010, 01:31 AM
:EVILLE:

You are an evil woman and poor children will wake up in a cold sweat 20 years from now.

topaz
03-11-2010, 01:33 AM
My most recent book purchase, audiobook, Kim Harrison's Black Magic Sanction. This is the 8th book in the Rachel Morgan series. Kim Harrison is one of the best authors in the Urban Fantasy genre. I highly recommend this series.

Japanfan
03-11-2010, 01:58 AM
I like Anne Bishop a lot, although not enough to buy Shalador's Lady in hardcover; I'll read it next year when it comes out in paperback. I did read The Shadow Queen last week. The only Anne Bishop I haven't liked is the Pillars of the World trilogy.


My favourite Anne Bishop works are the two for her latest series: Sebastien and Ephemera. The world she creates is fascinating and unlike any other I've encountered in fantasy or science fiction.

Nomad
03-11-2010, 03:53 AM
What sort of sick mind would come up with something like that--and then make someone else read it?

I liked the idea. In fact, I thought The Penniless Peer would make a fine candidate. :shuffle:

Matryeshka
03-11-2010, 04:06 AM
The Black Jewels has to me her best and worst. I loved the original, and Dreams Made Flesh. But the spooky house story and The Invisible Ring were horrid, IMO. I liked Pillars of the World, but it was a bit Margaret Atwood Does High Fantasy While Listening to Celtic Women.

Finished the new Robert Crais. It was enjoyable, and I forgot it the instant I closed it. PERFECT book to read while it's raining. Next up: The Swan Thief.

Fergus
03-11-2010, 01:30 PM
Argh, I just realized that the Golda Meir bio that I recommended on this thread a while back was written by the same Elinor Burkett who charged the stage during the Oscar telecast! Still recommend it, though.....

Also, just started Gabaldon's Lord John series........

rfisher
03-11-2010, 02:28 PM
The Black Jewels has to me her best and worst. I loved the original, and Dreams Made Flesh. But the spooky house story and The Invisible Ring were horrid, IMO. I liked Pillars of the World, but it was a bit Margaret Atwood Does High Fantasy While Listening to Celtic Women.

Finished the new Robert Crais. It was enjoyable, and I forgot it the instant I closed it. PERFECT book to read while it's raining. Next up: The Swan Thief.

I'll be interested to hear your opinion on the Swan Thief. The reviews weren't favorable. Her first book had moments, but she made it way too tedious to be scary. You were well over the thriller moment by the time another one came along and no longer cared if the vampire was going to get them or not.

rfisher
03-12-2010, 12:09 PM
I was sent this through a writer's blog I monitor. There are a lot of mystery lovers here and these might be of interest to some of those interested in critical or academic writings on women mystery writers.

The Web of Iniquity
Early Detective Fiction by American Women
by Catherine Ross Nelson
Duke University Press
Durham & London, 1998
Covers the period from shortly after the civil war to Mary Roberts
Rheinhart

By a Womens Hand
A Guide to Mystery Fiction by Women
2nd ed.
by Jean Swansen & Dean Jones
Berkley Prime Crime
New York, 1996
Gives a short decription of the works of over 300 women mystery
writers who have published a least 3 books in a series starting since
1978.

Detective Agency
by Priscilla L. Walton & Manina Jones
University of California Press
Berkley, Los Angeles & London
1999
Examines the female private eye.

Sisters in Crime
Feminisism and the Crime Novel
by Maureen T. Reddy
Contuum Press
New York, 1988
Examines feminist ideas and themes in crime writing by women.

The Girl Sleuth
On the trail of Nancy Drew, Judy Bolton, and Cherry Ames
by Bobbie Ann Mason
Univerity of Georgia Press
Athens & London, 1995
The reminiscences of a woman growing up in the rural south of the
30's and 40's and how these young girls books (boys had to read The
Hardy Boys) might have influenced todays women authors. First
published in 1975.

shells
03-12-2010, 03:45 PM
I read Hush, Hush by someone Fitzpatrick the other day. I'm not sure I felt the same about it as the people that suggested I should read it. Now I'm trying to read The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman. I don't know where I got it, but I know it was free. It won some kind of award so I thought I'd check it out. Not sure about it yet.

PrincessLeppard
03-12-2010, 05:55 PM
I loved the Graveyard Book. But then, I love Neil Gaiman. :)

shells
03-12-2010, 06:07 PM
I've never read anything by Neil Gaiman before this. Which seems funny as all of my friends are fans of his.

Satellitegirl
03-12-2010, 06:44 PM
Have you read A Big Little Life A Memoir of a Joyful Dog by Dean Koontz? If you haven't and you like his writing and you like dogs at all, you would probably enjoy it.




Just saw your post....is that book dedicated to Trixie? That was his dog that passed away not too long ago. And nope I haven't read it, but I love dogs, so I'll check it out :)

rjblue
03-12-2010, 07:27 PM
I love, LOVE Amy Tan. Kitchen God's Wife is still one of my favourite books. Me too. I've been intending to get Saving Fish From Drowning- I just love her book titles.


I can't believe I'm going to admit this. I'm 39 years old and I just finished the first four books of the Percy Jackson and the Olympians series. I have book 5, I just haven't started it yet.I liked the Percy Jackson books. My son also has really enjoyed the Simon Bloom books, so I read them too, and they were excellent. And I love the Artemis Fowl books. Young adult/preteen offerings are much improved over what was available when I was a child.

I'm currently reading William Gibson's "Spook Country", this Amazon reviewer describes it quite well:
In terms of plot, Spook Country has a very fine one... almost invisible. This is not good if you are still reading Gibson anticipating sci-fi, but it plays well if you are looking for a modern, nuanced read. It's the first Gibson book I've read, and I think I should have started with Neuromancer.