PDA

View Full Version : So Many Books, So Little Time (The Reading Thread)



Pages : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 [35] 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67

mkats
02-04-2010, 08:23 PM
Oh.

:slinkaway

modern_muslimah
02-04-2010, 08:52 PM
I'm reading A Case for God (http://www.amazon.com/Case-God-Karen-Armstrong/dp/0307269183/ref=tmm_hrd_title_0) by Karen Armstrong. So far I love it. She doesn't only look at the Western monotheistic concept of God but also various concepts of God as developed throughout the world. One of her main arguments is that the literalistic view of God and religion in general is the result of a modern preoccupation with scientific rationality (logos). I think Armstrong presents a convincing case that pre-modern humanity wasn't so entirely focused on rationality and as a result, their concept of God was much more open and flexible than ours.

rfisher
02-05-2010, 12:32 PM
Just finished Impact by Douglas Preston. His stand alones are somewhat better than his writing partner Lincoln Child, but neither are as good as their Pendergast collaborations, which I find intriguing. I try to pick out their individual styles that coalesce into one of my favorite fictional characters but can't other than all the spooky stuff comes from Child and not Preston. Impact was OK. Wait for the paperback if you like Preston. My biggest complaint is he spends a lot of ink developing a couple of characters who have minimal purpose, one of which could have easily been left out entirely. Yet, he does not give any backstory to a couple of key players. :huh: I'm not certain what he was doing. Maybe he was on drugs.

Just started The First Rule by Robert Crais, another favorite author. Crais normally focuses on Elvis Cole, but this is the second book to focus on Joe Pike. :swoon: Pike is sort of like Evanovich's Ranger (on whom she somewhat modeled the character) except cooler. Crais is always a fast, entertaining read. The difference between his Pike and Cole books is the sense of humor Elvis has. Pike is all business. Hot, but all business.

Grannyfan
02-05-2010, 04:10 PM
Recently finished Shutter Islandby Dennis Lahaye. It's a good mystery/suspense novel, and I'm looking forward to the movie. Now I'm trying to get through The Lace Reader but not liking it very much so far.

Cupid
02-05-2010, 05:07 PM
Kathy Griffin - The Official Book Club Selection. Got this one as a gift and just started it. So far, so good. We are about the same age, so some of the things she discusses in her youth brings back memories from that time period.

shells
02-05-2010, 05:39 PM
Recently finished Shutter Islandby Dennis Lahaye. It's a good mystery/suspense novel, and I'm looking forward to the movie. Now I'm trying to get through The Lace Reader but not liking it very much so far.

My friend read The Lace Reader and loved it. I'm not sure how far into it you are, but maybe give it some extra patience to see if it gets better?

I am reading Darklight by Lesley Livingston. This is the second in what should be a trilogy. It's written for teens, but when I met her she was just about the nicest and funniest author I've ever met. Plus, she shared the story of how when she met him she touched Hugh Jackman's chest. Someone she knows is involved with the XMen franchise, she was a fan of the comics when younger and wanted to meet the Australian who was going to play the Canadian Wolverine... or something. The important part of the story really was how she touched his chest :lol:

Wyliefan
02-05-2010, 06:11 PM
I just finished reading Jasper FForde's Shades of Grey (http://www.amazon.com/Shades-Grey-Novel-Jasper-Fforde/product-reviews/0670019631/ref=cm_cr_dp_all_helpful?ie=UTF8&coliid=&showViewpoints=1&colid=&sortBy=bySubmissionDateDescending). It's not as wacky as some of his earlier works, it's a bit darker, definitely dystopian. I liked it but didn't love it. I suppose the fact that nothing was particularly wrapped up bothered me. Then I read that it is supposedly book 1 of a trilogy. I don't like to read trilogies etc. unless all the books are published (so I can run out and finish the story if I like the books). Ehh... I'd give it a 3 or 3.5 out 5.

3.5 out of 5 is exactly what I gave it in my review on LJ! It was well-written but . . . yeah, it just couldn't live up to the Thursday Next or even the Nursery Crimes series. Part of the problem was Eddie, I think -- he's a nice guy, but weak. He doesn't have the tenacity or strength or moral fiber that make you love Thursday Next, at least not yet. In fact, there aren't really any characters worth rooting for, except Jane and a few of her friends. I liked Eddie's dad at first, but he turned out to be corrupt too.

Grannyfan
02-05-2010, 07:57 PM
My friend read The Lace Reader and loved it. I'm not sure how far into it you are, but maybe give it some extra patience to see if it gets better?

That's what I'm hoping. I've read over 100 pages, and it's not that long a book, so I'll definitely go ahead and finish it.

Myskate
02-06-2010, 04:37 PM
I am re-reading Jean Auel"s series "Clan of the Cave Bear" etc. I loved the first few and am trying to love the last few. The problem is that her books take forever--and I mean that. The first book I read in middle school and the last was published 18 years ago. Supposedly she is still working on another or she has died. I have heard both rumors. Anyone hear any differently?

rfisher
02-06-2010, 04:44 PM
I am re-reading Jean Auel"s series "Clan of the Cave Bear" etc. I loved the first few and am trying to love the last few. The problem is that her books take forever--and I mean that. The first book I read in middle school and the last was published 18 years ago. Supposedly she is still working on another or she has died. I have heard both rumors. Anyone hear any differently?

The Shelters of Stone was published in 2002, 8 years ago not 18. :lol: I've read the rumors that she died, but I think they are only rumors. The truth is she is quite old and I think her son helped write the last book. My biggest problem with the last 3 books is she repeated herself over and over and over. The books could have dropped 300 pages and not dropped a plot line. I've always hoped they'd finish the series. She had plans to take it several books further on, but I doubt that will happen unless she has copious notes for somebody to pick up the series.

mkats
02-06-2010, 04:51 PM
Oh, the Clan of the Cave Bear. :lol: The first book was amazing, the second great, the third pretty good, the fourth still decent, the fifth... :huh: the next time I have to read about the medicinal properties of datura...read it once and I think it's being used as a doorstop somewhere.

But if book six ever comes out I'll be first in line to read it! When I found that it had taken so long for each one to come out all I could think of was "Thank God JK Rowling kept cranking them out regularly" :lol:

Myskate
02-06-2010, 04:59 PM
The Shelters of Stone was published in 2002, 8 years ago not 18. :lol: I've read the rumors that she died, but I think they are only rumors. The truth is she is quite old and I think her son helped write the last book. My biggest problem with the last 3 books is she repeated herself over and over and over. The books could have dropped 300 pages and not dropped a plot line. I've always hoped they'd finish the series. She had plans to take it several books further on, but I doubt that will happen unless she has copious notes for somebody to pick up the series.

Oops! My bad, I guess I was thinking of the Plains of Passage which I got for Christmas the year my son was born. The books all started to sound the same and that's probably why I was mistaken. Still love the first 3 though.

Matryeshka
02-06-2010, 05:13 PM
I recently finished Catching Fire, book 3 of the Hunger Games trilogy, and I don't know if I can wait till book three comes out. After the discussion on Pale Fire for my book club, I went back and re-read it and decided that it's much more fun to discuss than actually read, and I'm probably not cut out for high literature.

Just starting The Art of Racing in the Rain.

KCC
02-06-2010, 05:56 PM
I am re-reading Jean Auel"s series "Clan of the Cave Bear" etc. I loved the first few and am trying to love the last few. The problem is that her books take forever--and I mean that. The first book I read in middle school and the last was published 18 years ago. Supposedly she is still working on another or she has died. I have heard both rumors. Anyone hear any differently?

I read these books many years ago, and your mention of them again made me smile. DH & I are moving to Idaho soon and we donated several boxes of books, but I kept these. I read them at a tough time in my life and they provided good therapy. (And then I found skating.)

rfisher
02-07-2010, 01:09 AM
The First Rule was typical Robert Crais. I love Joe Pike and Elvis Cole. It's so much fun to pick up a book and just read it straight through. I always picture Elvis as looking like Crais who is hawt. The only complaint I have is Pike doesn't have a GPS in his vehicle in spite of having a friend with all sorts of surveillance toys and being bugged by the ATF for part of the book. :lol: I'm certain there's a reason, but I have no idea what it is. I was confused for a while. There's mention of a baby in the first chapter then no mention of it for a third of the book. The baby is ultimately an important element in the book, but I kept going back to make certain I'd actually read that there was one.

Starting on Death of a Valentine by MC Beaton. I love her Hamish Macbeth mysteries although I don't really like her Agatha Raison series. Mostly because I've listened to several of the Macbeth books on audio and I love the Scottish accents.