PDA

View Full Version : So Many Books, So Little Time (The Reading Thread)



Pages : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 [34] 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67

silverstars
01-28-2010, 04:51 PM
I just finished reading Half-Broke Horses by Jeanette Walls, and I highly, highly recommend it, as well as her first book, The Glass Castle. HBH is a "true life novel," so it's based off of the events of her grandmother's life, but certain things had to be re-imagined by Walls because, obviously, things like dialogue would be impossible to remember, but The Glass Castle is an actual narrative about Walls' life, and the things that she's gone through are just awe-inspiring.

Continuing with the life-story theme, one of my friends kind of randomly gave me this book Wonderful Tonight by Pattie Boyd for Christmas (well, I'm a Beatles fan, so I guess it wasn't completely random, but it's not something that I would have bought myself). I've only just gotten around to it, and while it's irritating how she always paints herself as the victim (as in, woe is me, I'm married to George Harrison, living in a castle, and my husband's BFF, Eric Clapton, is in love with me) and kind of lacking in agency, not to mention that I've most certainly read better writers, it's been sort of interesting to learn about the other, less shiny side of the Beatles, particularly George (who TOTALLY would have hated her for publishing this if he was still alive). It's good because the actual events of her life are quite interesting, so if you like the Beatles or Eric Clapton and are in need of some light reading, I suggest borrowing it from the library (don't spend your money).

orientalplane
01-28-2010, 04:56 PM
I got a collection of shorter fiction by Oscar Wilde in English in attempt to enrich my vocabulary. Man, I lurves Oscar Wilde :inavoid:

Me too! I absolutely love Wilde's fairy tales and short stories. No one could - or would have dared to - write quite like Wilde. I hope you enjoy them! :)

immoimeme
01-28-2010, 08:07 PM
I just pre-ordered "The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest" from Amazon. The delivery date is about May 28th, but I'm keeping my fingers crossed it will come about a week earlier. I'm taking a trip and I need an "airport" book.
I pre-ordered it too. It's down to $11.50, so, why not! I don't want to have to wait on the library list for it.

I have "A Place Called Freedom" by (you guessed it LOL) Ken Follett to read when the power goes out. Which might be any minute. :P

sk8pics
01-28-2010, 11:14 PM
I just finished reading Half-Broke Horses by Jeanette Walls, and I highly, highly recommend it, as well as her first book, The Glass Castle. HBH is a "true life novel," so it's based off of the events of her grandmother's life, but certain things had to be re-imagined by Walls because, obviously, things like dialogue would be impossible to remember, but The Glass Castle is an actual narrative about Walls' life, and the things that she's gone through are just awe-inspiring.

I think I read about HBH and it sounded interesting... maybe I'll put it on my list. Thanks for the reminder!

star_gazer11
01-29-2010, 12:03 AM
Now I am re-reading "Jackdaws" as Ken Follett writes short, hard, and fast chapters--perfect for reading during lulls in competitions.

I liked that one, too. Did you know that Pillars of the Earth is being turned into a tv miniseries and that he has a new trilogy coming up?

I picked up The Swan Thieves by Elizabeth Kostova from the library this week.

Finnice
01-31-2010, 08:35 PM
Has anyone read "U is for Undertow" by Sue Grafton yet? If so, I'd like to hear what you think of the storyline and the ending. It made me a bit confused (which isn't too hard to do, probably). :lol:

I have read all her books, and this was not one of my favourites. I guess she ties the plot knots ok, but little unsurprisingly. If you mean the last two pages
Kinseys Grand aka Grandma just mixes Kinsey with her mother, showing she is already more than a bit gaga

jen_faith
01-31-2010, 09:38 PM
I just finished reading Jasper FForde's Shades of Grey (http://www.amazon.com/Shades-Grey-Novel-Jasper-Fforde/product-reviews/0670019631/ref=cm_cr_dp_all_helpful?ie=UTF8&coliid=&showViewpoints=1&colid=&sortBy=bySubmissionDateDescending). It's not as wacky as some of his earlier works, it's a bit darker, definitely dystopian. I liked it but didn't love it. I suppose the fact that nothing was particularly wrapped up bothered me. Then I read that it is supposedly book 1 of a trilogy. I don't like to read trilogies etc. unless all the books are published (so I can run out and finish the story if I like the books). Ehh... I'd give it a 3 or 3.5 out 5.

zaphyre14
02-03-2010, 05:23 PM
On Pracer's recommendation, I'm reading "Sacrifice" - the Shetland Island mystery now. It's keeping my attention, but honestly, how many times can this woman almost die? :)

PrincessLeppard
02-03-2010, 07:49 PM
I just finished Cormac McCarthy's "The Road," and I liked it a great deal. My only critique would be that I would like to know more about how the apocalypse happened, but it isn't really central to the story.

Prancer
02-03-2010, 08:57 PM
On Pracer's recommendation, I'm reading "Sacrifice" - the Shetland Island mystery now. It's keeping my attention, but honestly, how many times can this woman almost die? :)

Ahem.


I just finished Sacrifice by S.J. Bolton (http://www.amazon.com/Sacrifice-S-J-Bolton/dp/0312381131). The book has a familiar plot--husband and wife move to middle of nowhere, fish-out-of-water wife stumbles across something that seems like an ancient ritual tied to local folklore, the locals all seem to be in a conspiracy of silence and her husband just might be in it up to his neck. Much of what ensues is :rolleyes:, which is typical of this sort of thing, but the author is pretty good at creating a sinister atmosphere and a creepy, claustrophobic tension. It's also rather gruesome in parts, especially in the opening chapter.

All I can say is, when she gets on the boat, try not to throw the book at the wall.

Evilynn
02-04-2010, 01:11 PM
I just finished Cormac McCarthy's "The Road," and I liked it a great deal. My only critique would be that I would like to know more about how the apocalypse happened, but it isn't really central to the story.

I assumed he didn't really mention it just so it'd age better, and since I found some bits a little iffy scientifically, I'm kind of glad he was vague about it. Other than some of the logical flaws I liked it rather a lot too. :)

Prancer
02-04-2010, 02:26 PM
I'm reading A Country Called Amreeka: Arab Roots, American Stories (http://www.amazon.com/Country-Called-Amreeka-American-ebook/dp/B002QJZ9ZE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&m=AG56TWVU5XWC2&s=digital-text&qid=1265293321&sr=1-1), which I'm finding fascinating so far, partly because I knew nothing about the history of Arab immigration to the US and partly because I really like the way the book is structured. Each chapter begins with a brief summary of an historical event and is followed with the personal story of an Arab-American whose life was connected with that event in some way.

Cupid
02-04-2010, 05:00 PM
I have read all her books, and this was not one of my favourites. I guess she ties the plot knots ok, but little unsurprisingly. If you mean the last two pages
Kinseys Grand aka Grandma just mixes Kinsey with her mother, showing she is already more than a bit gaga

Exactly what did Michael Sutton see being buried out in the backyard? I thought there was proof (photos, timelines) that Michael was on vacation with his family when Mary Claire disappeared.

mkats
02-04-2010, 05:56 PM
I finished Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and am waiting for the Girl who Plays w/ Fire. I don't think our library had book 3 :wuzrobbed:

Prancer
02-04-2010, 08:07 PM
I don't think our library had book 3 :wuzrobbed:

It isn't out yet. :)