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View Full Version : So Many Books, So Little Time (The Reading Thread)



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Charlini
12-19-2009, 10:44 PM
I'm reading Seabiscuit: an American legend by Laura Hillenbrand which the film starring Tobey Maguire was based on.
WOW, I was shocked to read the elaborate description of what the jockeys did to keep their weight down. One disturbing way to keep themselves thin was deliberately ingesting tapeworm larvae and then having the tapeworm surgically removed...:eek:
As difficult as it is for figure skaters struggling with their weight & anorexia, there is no comparison to what these jockeys during that time had to endure to maintain such a low weight.

IceAlisa
12-19-2009, 11:16 PM
One disturbing way to keep themselves thin was deliberately ingesting tapeworm larvae and then having the tapeworm surgically removed...:eek:

I've heard of this method that IIRC may still be used today to keep thin for vanity purposes by some rather disturbed individuals. But I am confused as to why the worm has to be surgically removed? It can be purged with medications and passed. :confused: (Yes, I know a segment may break off and the cycle could restart but people do pass the whole thing. Gross, I know).

In fact, GROSS STUFF TO FOLLOW!!! I know a biology professor who contracted one in Africa and passed it in its entirety. He then proceeded to put it in a jar with some fixative and display it on his mantle piece.

bobalina77
12-20-2009, 12:04 AM
I'm reading brainless stuff right now.. Ruby which is the first book of the Landry series by VC Andrews (but not really as she had died by then) haha. I haven't read them since I was a teenager.. it's fascinatingly bad but I can't put it down :lol:

Wyliefan
12-20-2009, 02:25 AM
If you're reading Andrews, you HAVE to read this woman's (http://bookshelvesofdoom.blogs.com/bookshelves_of_doom/2009/01/flowers-in-the-attic-dollanganger-1-v-c-andrews.html) take on Flowers on the Attic. It had me :rofl: all the way through.

bobalina77
12-20-2009, 03:22 AM
Oh.. yeah I've read that and Ruby is just as bad.. yet I can't seem to put it down. I will likely end up reading the whole Landry series and I may even read Flowers in the Attic again just for kicks :lol:

Charlini
12-20-2009, 04:46 AM
I've heard of this method that IIRC may still be used today to keep thin for vanity purposes by some rather disturbed individuals. But I am confused as to why the worm has to be surgically removed? It can be purged with medications and passed. :confused: (Yes, I know a segment may break off and the cycle could restart but people do pass the whole thing. Gross, I know).


Sorry, the tapeworm was not surgically removed. Here's the actual quote from the book:
"When the jockey became too malnourished, he could check into the hospital to have to worm removed, then return to the track and swallow a new pill capsule (with the tapeworm egg)." :wideeyes:

Jenny
12-20-2009, 02:25 PM
Please post a review. I haven't read anything by Martin Cruz Smith in a while, but I always liked the Arkady books.

Have you read Rose? A bit different than his other books in setting/timeframe, but one I really enjoyed and that has stayed with me years later.

zaphyre14
12-21-2009, 01:40 PM
I finished the "Grave Secret" and am sincerely hoping that Harris will not end the series with this volume, although it reads as if it's the end by tying up all the major plotlines from previous books.

I've started JD Robb's "Kindred in Death" at home and am still laboring through "Shopaholic" in the car.

rfisher
12-21-2009, 02:15 PM
I finished the "Grave Secret" and am sincerely hoping that Harris will not end the series with this volume, although it reads as if it's the end by tying up all the major plotlines from previous books.

I've started JD Robb's "Kindred in Death" at home and am still laboring through "Shopaholic" in the car.

I've read a couple of the Grave books. Did the two of them finally get that they weren't really related?

Nearly finished with Forty Words for Sorrow by Gilles Blunt. It's more of a police procedural than a mystery (since you know who the killer is fairly soon). It's OK and I'll probably read the rest of the series, although the reviews indicate the books get less OK as they go along.

immoimeme
12-21-2009, 04:59 PM
"Angle of Repose" is on perma-hold. The library had an "unsecured" copy (there is a verrry lengthy waiting list) of Stephen King's latest doorstop, er, book, so I snagged it. :cool:

Allen
12-21-2009, 05:10 PM
I finished Thomas Pynchon's Inherent Vice[/I] last night and I'm totally in love with that book. I've always been a Pynchon fan, but I think this might be his most accessible book.

I'm dying with anticipation waiting for Don DeLillo's Point Omega to come out in February.

I also want to recommend The Colony by Jillian Weise which comes out in March. I also recommend her book of poetry The Amputee's Guide to Sex.

zaphyre14
12-21-2009, 05:12 PM
I've read a couple of the Grave books. Did the two of them finally get that they weren't really related? .

Yes. This last one has them dealing with the whole disfunctional family.

Prancer
12-29-2009, 11:56 PM
Did no one get any good books for Christmas?


I decided to read The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie (http://www.amazon.com/Sweetness-at-Bottom-Pie/dp/0385342306).

I'm also reading Haunted Ground (http://www.amazon.com/Haunted-Ground-Novel-Erin-Hart/dp/0743272102/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1261145517&sr=1-1)


Let me know how you like them both. I am always on the lookout for a fun book.

The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie is fun because of the sprightly narration and dialogue, but the mystery part of it is clumsily handled and the setting--1950s England--is virtually nonexistent. Everything about the book seemed to be set in another, earlier century. But it's still a fun book--suspend belief and zip right through it.

Haunted Ground was okay; I found the historical mystery (who was the girl in the peat?) more interesting than the modern one, even though I thought the resolution of the ancient one was a wee bit too convenient. But I liked it enough that I intend to read the next one in the series.

I also read Crazy for God: How I Grew Up as One of the Elect, Helped Found the Religious Right, and Lived to Take All (or Almost All) of It Back (http://www.amazon.com/Crazy-God-Helped-Religious-Almost/dp/0786718919), a memoir I found interesting on several levels. The author had a really different, interesting childhood and adulthood, too, for that matter. I could relate to some of the problems he faced growing up in a strict evangelical household with parents who loved culture. I had only a vague idea who his parents were and why they were important to the religious right movement and now I know something about it. And the reactions of people in the evangelical world have been very interesting to read.

Finally starting on Still Life (http://www.amazon.com/Still-Life-Inspector-Gamache-Mysteries/dp/0312541538/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1262130860&sr=1-1), which is supposed to be very good.

immoimeme
12-30-2009, 12:15 AM
I'm not sure "Under The Dome" is a Good Book but that certainly hasn't stopped me from reading it almost non-stop. I have no idea why I care about allllllll (there are many) these characters and the dome generator thing is so far sort of stupid concept but I'm still reading it!

That "Inside the shopper's mind" or whatever the title was was pretty dry. I guess if you are in marketing or retail it would be more...uh, interesting. The only things I got from it was that I personally would lurve to shop in a store with a central market/bazaar kind of set up and that the reason I can't find what I want is because no one is marketing to my niche.

mmscfdcsu
12-30-2009, 12:22 AM
I finally got around to reading a medical thriller that I bought a while back. Read it last night and this morning.

http://www.michaelpalmerbooks.com/fifth.html

It really held my interest. It is not great writing, but he does do good plots and is getting quite good at creating characters. You don't see much in the way of writing interesting characters in medical thrillers for the most part.