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View Full Version : So Many Books, So Little Time (The Reading Thread)



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made_in_canada
09-23-2009, 10:07 AM
I'm reading The Historian right now... It's completely creeping me out. It's not even the kind of book I would normally read, but it was on the 70% off table at Chapters and the cover was pretty... Probably good to expand my horizons anyway.

rfisher
09-23-2009, 11:38 AM
I like Atwood, but she may not be your cup of tea, since you like to read for fun and frolic. She's written a lot of short stories; you might be able to find one or two online to try before you dive into a whole book. Or you might want to check one out of the library and read a bit first, just to see what you think.

I'm making my bi-weekly trip to the library this week to swap audio books.

Diana Gabaldon has already lost her slot in my 5 currently open rotating book list. I hate when she tries to write history. I read the first three chapters last night and probably skipped half the material. Three Bags Full is now back on top. I never thought I'd say Othello and Miss Maple are more entertaining than Jamie and Claire.

PrincessLeppard
09-23-2009, 12:23 PM
My friend was raving about these books to me the other day. After making sure I was never going to read them she told me all about them.

She didn't like Catching Fire as much as The Hunger Games.

I read the Hunger Games in one night. Catching Fire starts off veeeerrryy slowly, but once the twist happened, I couldn't put the book down.

Wyliefan
09-23-2009, 02:24 PM
You know what book I really liked and still remember even though I read it like 10+ years ago? LOST MOON. It is the autobiography of Jim Lovell and the book the movie Apollo 13 was based on (which is one of my favorites). The book is about Lovell's life in the beginning and then the Apollo 13 mission. It is written in a third-person narrative style, which was a little strange, but it was fascinating reading how his life progressed and all the quirky and weird coincidences that occured in his life that lead him to the military, NASA, how he was named to that Mission. Not to mention all the weird coincidences that happened in regards to that Mission that lead to the accident, how they resolved the problems; fascinating. I was too young to remember when it happened, but it amazes me to this day those men survived.....and it was friggin' 1970 technology! :lol: It's a fascinating read (or did I say that already :P).

http://www.amazon.com/Lost-Moon-Perilous-Voyage-Apollo/dp/0395670292/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1253682169&sr=8-1

Great book. Jim Lovell came and spoke at my college years ago, and signed my copy. Really neat guy.

Aimless
09-23-2009, 03:06 PM
[QUOTE=star_gazer11;2384706]I'm about 1/3 way through The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society (http://www.bookdepository.com/book/9780385341004/The-Guernsey-Literary-and-Potato-Peel-Pie-Society). Yes, it's charming, but I'm not getting all the hype about it.

GLPPPS is grossly overrated. Chicken soup style. Derivative (Pride & Prejudice), predictable, cartoonish characters, and the epistolary style got very strained at times. If it hadn't been for the very interesting and moving historical detail about Guernsey's ordeal during WWII, I'd have put it down. Choice of my book club, what are you going to do.

Our book this time is The Reader. Much chewier.

Wyliefan
09-23-2009, 03:39 PM
[QUOTE=star_gazer11;2384706]I'm about 1/3 way through The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society (http://www.bookdepository.com/book/9780385341004/The-Guernsey-Literary-and-Potato-Peel-Pie-Society). Yes, it's charming, but I'm not getting all the hype about it.

GLPPPS is grossly overrated. Chicken soup style. Derivative (Pride & Prejudice), predictable, cartoonish characters, and the epistolary style got very strained at times. If it hadn't been for the very interesting and moving historical detail about Guernsey's ordeal during WWII, I'd have put it down. Choice of my book club, what are you going to do.


I liked it. :slinkaway It's not the greatest novel ever, but it's sweet and enjoyable, and the historical detail is indeed interesting.

zhenya271
09-23-2009, 09:57 PM
[QUOTE=star_gazer11;2384706]I'm about 1/3 way through The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society (http://www.bookdepository.com/book/9780385341004/The-Guernsey-Literary-and-Potato-Peel-Pie-Society). Yes, it's charming, but I'm not getting all the hype about it.

GLPPPS is grossly overrated. Chicken soup style. Derivative (Pride & Prejudice), predictable, cartoonish characters, and the epistolary style got very strained at times. If it hadn't been for the very interesting and moving historical detail about Guernsey's ordeal during WWII, I'd have put it down. Choice of my book club, what are you going to do.

Our book this time is The Reader. Much chewier.

GLPPPS has sat on my nightstand for months. The subject matter is appealing, but after the first few pages it didn't have me reaching for it the following nights when there were other titles to choose from. I plan to get to it one of these days, but as the thread title goes...:)

Nomad
09-23-2009, 10:31 PM
Series. I should not buy series. I just started Storm Jameson's Mirror in Darkness trilogy; I still have to finish The Balkan Trilogy; then there are The Levant Trilogy, G. B. Stern's Rakonitz Chronicles (five novels), and Richardson's Pilgrimage (13 novels) all waiting to be read.

rjblue
09-23-2009, 11:29 PM
Margaret Atwood- I read Handmaid's Tale many years ago and hated it so much that I thought I didn't like Atwood at all. Then the CBC aired an audio serial of Alias Grace, which I loved and I bought the book to get the bits I missed.

I've also read and enjoyed The Robber Bride and The Blind Assasin.

On another note, my daughter and a few others have decided to start a book club. The first book-The Virgin Secretary's Impossible Boss (http://www.eharlequin.com/storeitem.html?iid=19928).

shells
09-24-2009, 04:56 AM
I looked at that title and thought 'that has to be a Harlequin'...and sure enough.

I love those books. I've never read them, but I had many hours of enjoyment throughout my 9 years at the bookstore giggling at the titles as I merchandised them and also as I stripped them to return them.

(ETA: I want to make it clear that I am not saying they aren't worth reading - just that they have hilarious titles)

pair mom
09-24-2009, 05:43 AM
Don't waste you time reading My Sister's Keeper! It was a light interesting tale with interesting perspective and it raised many ethical questions about the role of tissue harvesting and genetic blueprinting. I enjoyed the story .....until the last 5 pages! What a juvenile and shameful plot resolution! It seemed the author never had an intelligent ending in mind and just decided to shut down the computer and mail off the manuscript to the publisher! A major disappointment. :(

IceAlisa
09-24-2009, 05:56 AM
I like Atwood, but she may not be your cup of tea, since you like to read for fun and frolic. She's written a lot of short stories; you might be able to find one or two online to try before you dive into a whole book. Or you might want to check one out of the library and read a bit first, just to see what you think.

I like Atwood too. The Handmaid's Tale is great. I've also liked the Robber Bride and Edible Woman, both were light reads IMO.

I am finishing up several projects right now including a paper and two or three presentations so reading is mostly on hold. I am still on The 19th Wife which made me appreciate the PI polygamy thread so much more.

Earlier this month before all the craziness started I finished Isabel Allende's Daughter of Fortune and plan to read the sequel Portrait in Sepia. I've always had a weakness for Allende and magical realism in general.

Nomad
09-24-2009, 06:52 PM
I looked at that title and thought 'that has to be a Harlequin'...and sure enough.

I love those books. I've never read them, but I had many hours of enjoyment throughout my 9 years at the bookstore giggling at the titles as I merchandised them and also as I stripped them to return them.

(ETA: I want to make it clear that I am not saying they aren't worth reading - just that they have hilarious titles)

My favorite is probably Love's Windswept Embrace, about a female balloonist named Ariel Windsor.

sk8pics
09-24-2009, 10:52 PM
I just picked up 3 books at Borders:

A Bit Little Life, A Memoir of a Joyful Dog --I read an excerpt in Reader's Digest a few months ago and was really intrigued. I'll start this tonight.

Tell Me Where It Hurts -- a story of a veterinary surgeon

Lone Survivor --an account of Operation Redwing and the lost heroes of Seal Team 10

I love to read but don't usually have much time to read, but I'm trying to turn over a new leaf.

Buzz
09-25-2009, 04:57 PM
Just finished Dennis Lehane's "Shutter Island", and true to Lehane's writting the ending left me in knots and totally confused. LOL But I still love the few of his books I have read. If anyone has read this book you know what I mean about the ending, could you clearify it for me?! Was Teddy Daniels truely insane and his real name Andrew Laeddis? Or had the institution and it's staff gotten to him. His memories at the end seems genuine enough, but I am still so confused! I the book at the beginning and certain parts in the end were deliberately misleading.