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View Full Version : So Many Books, So Little Time (The Reading Thread)



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shells
12-03-2009, 02:11 PM
I saw that (Push) in the store in the airport the other day and wondered about it. I've heard so many good things about the movie. But then, I remembered what the movie was about, and figured I wouldn't be able to handle reading it, so I left it where it was.

I finished First Daughter by Eric Van Lustbader on my way home from San Francisco. The next book on my list is The Girl Who Played With Fire. I can't wait to read it.

laurenjm
12-03-2009, 02:31 PM
Kings Dragon--Kate Elliott

I also have a stash of 5 books I got from the library yesterday, but I need to order the rest of this series too.

genevieve
12-10-2009, 08:00 PM
The next book on my list is The Girl Who Played With Fire. I can't wait to read it.
I just finished The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo last night. It took me a little while to get into it - enjoyed it from the beginning but would put it down for a few days and then have to go back a little to get back into it - but the last half of it is gripping. I was up until 3am on Tues trying to finish it and just couldn't so settled in last night to polish it off. It's engaging all the way through to the last paragraph. (ETA: at first I thought this was the book you were talking about, but I left the description in just in case there's anyone in the world left who hasn't read it and might be persuaded).

Next in my queue is Chronic City, which has been patiently sitting on my nightstand for about 6 weeks while I read 2 other books, but I want to go buy The Girl Who Played With Fire RIGHT NOW and get started on it.

A bit OT, but I've got a friend on FB who's in the publishing business and the only posts he makes are to add to the list of books he's read during the year - I think that's very cool, and as someone who's trying to get back into reading I might try it in 2010.

immoimeme
12-11-2009, 01:54 AM
I started reading "Angle of Repose" and while it's interesting so far, I put it down the other night muttering "It's got too many words!"

laurenjm
12-11-2009, 02:10 PM
Hunted down Prince of Dogs-Kate Elliott at another library so I am continuing her 7 book series!

Prancer
12-14-2009, 01:27 PM
I just finished The Calling by "Inger Ash Wolfe." Inger Ash Wolfe is supposedly the pen name of a well-known (but unnamed) literary novelist.

The book is about a detective searching for a serial killer; the detective is a 61-year-old female detective constable with a bit of a drinking and prescription drug problem, and the serial killer is crossing rural Canada killing the terminally ill.

The book got great reviews and there are reasons for that; the writing and characterizations are generally very good. But Canadians will no doubt find the book riddled with errors about Canada (I've read some very :mad: reviews; I wouldn't know the difference myself), I was annoyed by the police work (gimme a break) and those who are interested in the literary quality of the book (and while it is good, it isn't a literary masterpiece by any means) will probably be turned off by the violence and grotesque descriptions.

Not sure what to say about that one.

rfisher
12-14-2009, 01:44 PM
I just finished The Calling by "Inger Ash Wolfe." Inger Ash Wolfe is supposedly the pen name of a well-known (but unnamed) literary novelist.

The book is about a detective searching for a serial killer; the detective is a 61-year-old female detective constable with a bit of a drinking and prescription drug problem, and the serial killer is crossing rural Canada killing the terminally ill.

The book got great reviews and there are reasons for that; the writing and characterizations are generally very good. But Canadians will no doubt find the book riddled with errors about Canada (I've read some very :mad: reviews; I wouldn't know the difference myself), I was annoyed by the police work (gimme a break) and those who are interested in the literary quality of the book (and while it is good, it isn't a literary masterpiece by any means) will probably be turned off by the violence and grotesque descriptions.

Not sure what to say about that one.


Is it worthy of a Borders coupon?

Prancer
12-14-2009, 01:54 PM
Is it worthy of a Borders coupon?

I got it from the library and I'm glad I did. If I had bought it, it would be in the Goodwill box now. It's one of those books where I can admire the technique without really wanting to go back into that world

I did have a very creepy dream about the serial killer last night, though. :scream:

Jenny
12-14-2009, 02:22 PM
I just finished The Calling by "Inger Ash Wolfe." Inger Ash Wolfe is supposedly the pen name of a well-known (but unnamed) literary novelist.



I doubt it's him, but if Canadian detectives and somewhat brutal murders interest you, try Giles Blunt. He wrote a handful of books featuring John Cardinal, taking place in a very loosely disguised North Bay, Ontario. Good books, well written and thoughtful, and very Canadian IMO.

Nomad
12-14-2009, 04:14 PM
I just started The Girls in 3-B (http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbninquiry.asp?box=1558614567&pos=-1&EAN=9781558614567) (1959), part of the Feminist Press's "Femmes Fatales: Women Write Pulp" series. Three small town girls go to the Big City where they encounter men, lesbians, and drugs. And people thought Peyton Place was scandalous.

zaphyre14
12-14-2009, 04:18 PM
I finished a kid's book "100 Cupboards" over the weekend (I can't recall the author at the moment) and enjoyed it enough that I'll look for the sequel. I donated it to the office kids' book drive though

And now I'm into C.S. Harris' latest Sebastien St. Cry mystery "What Remains of Heaven." I enjoy the characters but I'm not surprised at some of the connections that are turned up. Apparently Regency-era Society in London is extremely close-knit - or the same handful of people are involved in all of the scullduggery going on. :)

Melly80
12-14-2009, 07:29 PM
I'm currently reading "Dracula the un-dead" by Dacre Stoker, the "official sequel" to Bram Stoker's "Dracula". I've almost finished it and am really enjoying it. The vampire hunters who survived the original "Dracula" novel have to go on hunting vampires some years later. The bloody countess Bathory of Hugary appears in the book as well. It's bloodier than Bram Stoker's original...

PrincessLeppard
12-14-2009, 07:35 PM
I am trying to read Yevgeny Zamaytin's "We," which is supposed to be the uber of all dystopian novels.

Well, it's totally dull, that's for sure.... :yawn:

Southpaw
12-14-2009, 07:42 PM
I am trying to read Yevgeny Zamaytin's "We," which is supposed to be the uber of all dystopian novels.

Well, it's totally dull, that's for sure.... :yawn:

Oh golly, I read that one YEARS ago. It's still in my bookcase.

I'm reading "Zeitoun" by Dave Eggers. I don't like Dave Eggers, but I decided to give him another chance with this one. It's meh. Not pulling me in, but not annoying me, either.

Prancer
12-14-2009, 08:50 PM
I doubt it's him, but if Canadian detectives and somewhat brutal murders interest you, try Giles Blunt. He wrote a handful of books featuring John Cardinal, taking place in a very loosely disguised North Bay, Ontario. Good books, well written and thoughtful, and very Canadian IMO.

Thanks; I'll put him on the list!

I've been reading Barbara Ehrenreich's Bright-Sided and once again I find myself agreeing with Ehrenreich's basic premise (there is a harmful side to the American cultural insistence on optimism and positive thinking at all times) while finding myself unconvinced by her arguments and annoyed by her methods.