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Jenny
11-13-2009, 01:50 PM
Yep, that was me. I was surprised how much I liked that book. Normally I like a heroine with a brain and a backbone. (Then again, I also liked Mansfield Park.)

I love Mansfield Park - have you seen Patricia Rozema's movie version?

It's one of the best classic adaptations I've ever seen. She's true to Jane, but then adds in a layer or two more by infusing Fanny with some of Jane's own life and character (the stories she writes are actually Jane's early works and letters). She also includes carefully researched details from the period that would have been known to Jane's contemporaries, but are long lost to modern readers.

Filming, sets, acting are all first rate.

cygnus
11-13-2009, 03:09 PM
I love Mansfield Park - have you seen Patricia Rozema's movie version?

It's one of the best classic adaptations I've ever seen. She's true to Jane, but then adds in a layer or two more by infusing Fanny with some of Jane's own life and character (the stories she writes are actually Jane's early works and letters). She also includes carefully researched details from the period that would have been known to Jane's contemporaries, but are long lost to modern readers.

Filming, sets, acting are all first rate.

I love this movie too, but it certainly was the most controversial of the JA adaptations that have come out in recent years. Many critics disliked it for departing from Austen and adding layers she may not have intended to be there. Personally I thought it added interest and complexity to the story, and it actually made Fanny into an interesting character!

And as you say- the acting and sets are wonderful- as are the costumes.

Jenny
11-13-2009, 03:13 PM
I love this movie too, but it certainly was the most controversial of the JA adaptations that have come out in recent years. Many critics disliked it for departing from Austen and adding layers she may not have intended to be there.

But that's the thing - the two main elements she added are true to Austen and the period. First, she used Jane's own writing as Fanny's - and given that Jane once said that Fanny was the character most like herself, it was an appropriate move that one might think Jane herself would approve of.

Second was the slavery element - this was fact from the day, and the issues would have been known to many contemporary readers. I'm trying to remember exactly how it played out, but there's something in the book, some reference, that gave Rozema the idea. The logic being that the book alluded to it, but without the benefit of contemporary knowledge, it had to be added a bit more blatantly for modern audiences. Otherwise, as far as I can remember, she was true to the book.

Nomad
11-13-2009, 05:27 PM
I love Mansfield Park - have you seen Patricia Rozema's movie version?

It's one of the best classic adaptations I've ever seen. She's true to Jane, but then adds in a layer or two more by infusing Fanny with some of Jane's own life and character (the stories she writes are actually Jane's early works and letters). She also includes carefully researched details from the period that would have been known to Jane's contemporaries, but are long lost to modern readers.

Filming, sets, acting are all first rate.

I have not, but it's now in my netflix queue.

emason
11-14-2009, 05:12 AM
I love Mansfield Park - have you seen Patricia Rozema's movie version?

It's one of the best classic adaptations I've ever seen.

IMO, vile, vile, vile - the worst adaption of Austen ever. I loathed it; you could not pay me to see it again.

Patti
11-14-2009, 08:05 AM
No, Donna Tartt seems to be a one-book-a-decade sort of writer. I was disappointed in her second book.

I think the best book I have read it the last few years is Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert. I saw recently that it is being made into a movie starring Julia Roberts (judgment out on that one). All three parts are fascinating - Italy, India and Bali.

Prancer
11-14-2009, 05:04 PM
Is that new Bryson book? I've read all of his others (except the one about Australia), so I need to check this out.

Just so you know, the book is something of a biography--it's part of the Great Lives series. But since so very little is known about Shakespeare, most of it is about Elizabethan history. I've read quite a bit of Elizabethan history, but it was all focused on the court; in this book, Bryson takes the tidbits that are known about Shakespeare and then describes the context for them, which means there is a lot of stuff about how the lower and middle class people of the time lived.

I find it all really fascinating, but don't go into it thinking you will be reading about Shakespeare.

Last night I read a bit about the heads of traitors being displayed on London Bridge, which I knew. What I didn't know was that there were so many heads that someone was appointed to be in charge of them and his title was--wait for it--Keeper of the Heads.

Only an internet skating fan would know why I found that funny.

falling_dance
11-18-2009, 05:19 PM
The Wise Woman: a parable (http://books.google.com/books?id=9PoBAAAAQAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=wise+woman+george+macdonald&client=firefox-a#v=onepage&q=&f=false), by George MacDonald: A spoiled princess is shown the way by a female Christ figure. I went pretty quickly through this one after finding it on a list of books dear to a now-atheist blogger's memory. It's odd. On the one hand, I rather wish that I'd read it in my 1980s gremlinhood, but now I'm sufficiently old and prideful to balk at the thin characterization of another dreadful girl in the story, as simple as some kids can be. Still, it's clever enough in its didacticism to be an engaging read. :o

Kasey
11-18-2009, 05:32 PM
Do I need an intervention if I confess that I browse through this thread with ebay open in another tab?? Just finished "Lost Moon" that someone in here suggested....just ebayed two more suggestions from here! :)

shells
11-18-2009, 10:36 PM
I'm a little more than halfway through Tempted. (these House of Night books seem to be my guilty pleasure) After that I'm hoping to borrow The Girl Who Played With Fire and read that.

rfisher
11-18-2009, 10:45 PM
Today's foray through Borders (it's not my fault. I had a 50, 30 and 20% coupon! Nobody could resist that)
Pat Cornwell's latest: The Scarpetta Factor (it was the 50% or I would have waited till PB. Cornwell has made tons of money off Kaye so I don't feel bad lowering her royalty payment)

The Girl Who Played With Fire: Stieg Larsson

Mind's Eye by Hakan Nesser. Nesser is a Swedish crime writer. BookPage describes this as "Mind's Eye satisfies on every level. It is an intelligently written, cleverly plotted tale, populated with believable characters. Nesser was superb right out of the gate." I'll report back.

my little pony
11-18-2009, 10:56 PM
The Girl Who Played With Fire: Stieg Larsson



I liked this a lot, I wont say anymore until you read it.

Melly80
11-19-2009, 08:03 AM
I liked this a lot, I wont say anymore until you read it.

I saw the movie last month and liked it a lot! I also want to read the 3 books now...

Nan
11-19-2009, 04:11 PM
The Girl Who Played With Fire: Stieg Larsson



I've just started this, too.

PrincessLeppard
11-19-2009, 07:41 PM
I just finished the most recent Preston/Child book and it was rather disappointing. Pendergrast is one of my favorite characters, and there's a lot of interesting stuff hinted at in the book, but never explained. Not to mention that they kill off one of the main characters, and that Nora Kelly does a lot of stupid stuff to get herself in trouble (if she weren't so stupid, much of the plot wouldn't have happened), as do a couple of the other characters.

Bummer.