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View Full Version : So Many Books, So Little Time (The Reading Thread)



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immoimeme
11-12-2009, 12:37 PM
I got stuck reading "The Age of Innocence." As in the film version, I still don't understand why Archer and Ellen make their respective sacrifices. So I left them writhing about in their moral anguish and went on to read "Ford County" by John Grisham. I've really enhoyed the stories I've read. Some of them had me laughing aloud. So far I've enjoyed "Blood Drive" and "Casino" the best.

immoimeme
11-12-2009, 12:50 PM
Haven't read a book in a while now. Nothing seems to be able to "catch my eye" as it were. Any recommendations for someone ( who shall remain anonymous :shuffle: ) who loves spy novels, books on WW2, or sci-fis so long as it is about the secret of Atlantis ? (and VERY light on the romance) :lol: Luvs me a good detective novel too. :DKen Follett, heLLLLO!

Eye of the Needle--spies and WWII
The Key to Rebecca--spies and WWII
The Man from St Petersburg--spies (and WWI)
Jackdaws--spies and WWII
Hornet Flight--spies and WWII

Patti
11-12-2009, 12:54 PM
One of my favorite books is Donna Tartt's The Secret History. As for Atwood, I liked The Robber Bride.

Melly80
11-12-2009, 01:13 PM
One of my favorite books is Donna Tartt's The Secret History. As for Atwood, I liked The Robber Bride.

Finally someone who's read Donna Tartt!!! I also loved her "Secret History"! Two years ago I also read her "The little friend" which I also liked a lot. Are there more novels by her?

Jenny
11-12-2009, 01:22 PM
I also read The Secret History some years ago - fascinating, creepy, couldn't put it down.

Ken Follett fans might like to try two of his early books that are less focused on war and other epic subject matter, and are quite funny: Paper Money, and The Modigliani Scandal.

shells
11-12-2009, 01:43 PM
I really enjoyed that book, too; it made me want to work at Starbucks, although I have to say that I have cleaned a lot of toilets in my time and never gotten nearly as much out of experience as the author did. :lol:

The actual Starbucks stuff interested me less than the stuff about his childhood. Meeting Frank Sinatra in a bar, or going off to Spain to meet Hemmingway. I know name dropping is considered gauche, but I was just amazed at the life he led before it all went so bad. I also really loved that his grown up kids were so forgiving, and that he was able to build great relationships with people who were approximately 40 years younger than him.

Allen
11-12-2009, 01:54 PM
One of my favorite books is Donna Tartt's The Secret History. As for Atwood, I liked The Robber Bride.

I LOVE The Robber Bride. I actually teach that novel in one of my literature classes. I am, however, a die hard Atwood fan. I love most of her books. In particular, I like her early works, Surfacing and The Edible Bride. My students really respond well to The Edible Bride when discussing feminist literary theory.

I just finished reading the 2009 Best American Non-Required Reading which is edited by Dave Eggers. I am a fan of this series in general and have every edition so far. In some ways, this may be my favorite edition of this series because it has several very interesting comics.

I also recently re-read Kelly Link's collections Stranger Things Happen and Magic for Beginners for an article I am in the process of writing. I am huge fan of Link and in particular of the stories "The Girl Detective," "Cat Skin," and "Stone Animals."

I am now moving on Jonathan Safran Foer's Eating Animals, which I hear really good things about.

Prancer
11-12-2009, 07:02 PM
The actual Starbucks stuff interested me less than the stuff about his childhood. Meeting Frank Sinatra in a bar, or going off to Spain to meet Hemmingway. I know name dropping is considered gauche, but I was just amazed at the life he led before it all went so bad. I also really loved that his grown up kids were so forgiving, and that he was able to build great relationships with people who were approximately 40 years younger than him.

Oh, ITA. I even thought the parts about his advertising career were interesting; I loved his descriptions of some of their pitches to clients.

I thought it was really interesting, too, that when things did go bad, he spent a little time feeling sorry for himself and then accepted, even embraced, that he was going to have to start all over again from the very bottom, even after all the things he had done and experienced. And then he did it. At one time, I wouldn't have been quite so impressed by that (So he got a job. What else was he supposed to do?), but now that I know people his age who have been through some of those things, I am totally impressed. Most people I know start drinking heavily--but they aren't drinking coffee.

The Starbucks parts could have been really :P; he talks about the place the way some people talk about answering an altar call and being saved. But he somehow makes it all really charming.

I got a flu shot at work this morning and since I assumed that there would be long lines, I broke into my books and took Bill Bryson's Shakespeare (http://www.amazon.com/Shakespeare-World-Stage-Eminent-Lives/dp/0060740221) with me. Alas, everything was run with military precision and it took me all of three minutes to walk in and get the shot. They told me to wait for about 15 minutes before I left to see if I had a reaction to the shot, so I got to read. For pleasure. Bliss! And in just that time, I learned at least 50 new things, laughed out loud twice, and got so hooked that I am compelled--COMPELLED--to put aside these papers and read some more. I do lurves me some Bill Bryson.

PrincessLeppard
11-12-2009, 07:06 PM
Is that new Bryson book? I've read all of his others (except the one about Australia), so I need to check this out.

Off to print off Border's coupon now....

Indra486
11-12-2009, 08:25 PM
Funny you should say that... (http://www.amazon.com/Mr-Darcy-Vampyre-Amanda-Grange/dp/1402236972)

Although I think that it's a sequel, not written into P&P.

Yep, it's one of many sequels.


I just found out yesterday publishing houses on twitter are giving away free books. Getting addicted to it.

my little pony
11-12-2009, 08:29 PM
Finally someone who's read Donna Tartt!!! I also loved her "Secret History"! Two years ago I also read her "The little friend" which I also liked a lot. Are there more novels by her?

I love The Secret History. I never heard of her other book. How would you compare the two?

IceAlisa
11-12-2009, 08:30 PM
Thanks to whomever recommended Thank Heaven Fasting (Nomad?). First I couldn't get over how vapid the main character and all the rest were but such were the times.

I have to say that while over the last hundred years women's rights have gained tremendous ground, the pressure to get married is still about the same and is approached only slightly differently.

Melly80
11-12-2009, 09:36 PM
I love The Seret History. I never heard of her other book. How would you compare the two?

It's been a while since I read it but it's also very well written. The main characters are children trying to solve a crime, I really enjoyed it! Not as "dark" as the other one.

rjblue
11-13-2009, 02:10 AM
I also recently re-read Kelly Link's collections Stranger Things Happen and Magic for Beginners for an article I am in the process of writing. I am huge fan of Link and in particular of the stories "The Girl Detective," "Cat Skin," and "Stone Animals." I loved Magic For Beginners- especially "Some Zombie Contingency Plans".

She's right up there with Ray Bradbury for me.

Nomad
11-13-2009, 03:01 AM
Thanks to whomever recommended Thank Heaven Fasting (Nomad?). First I couldn't get over how vapid the main character and all the rest were but such were the times.

I have to say that while over the last hundred years women's rights have gained tremendous ground, the pressure to get married is still about the same and is approached only slightly differently.

Yep, that was me. I was surprised how much I liked that book. Normally I like a heroine with a brain and a backbone. (Then again, I also liked Mansfield Park.)