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View Full Version : So Many Books, So Little Time (The Reading Thread)



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rjblue
11-02-2009, 12:01 AM
I did it!

Yesterday I finished the Wheel of Time series. (sort of)

The Eye of the World 832 pages
The Great Hunt - 736 pages
The Dragon Reborn - 704 pages
The Shadow Rising - 1008 pages
The Fires of Heaven - 992 pages
Lord of Chaos - 1024 pages
A Crown of Swords - 896 pages
The Path of Daggers - 704 pages
Winter's Heart - 800 pages
Crossroads of Twilight - 864 pages
Knife of Dreams - 832 pages

There are 1800 named characters in the series! I had to use the WOT wiki for the last 5 books. I speed read through all the battle scenes and political manuevering scenes and slow down for the characters I really want to follow (Matt, Nynaeve, Egwene).

I can't imagine ever rereading a book, and I can't imagine being a fan since the first book, and having to wait endlessly for the next book, hoping to finally reach the final battle.

The first of "the last three books" of the series- outlined by Robert Jordan before his death, and written by Brandon Sanderson, was published on last Tuesday, so I'll have to buy it. The good news is that I've read the first chapter on the TOR books website, and I think I like Sanderson's writing style better than Jordan's.

Prancer
11-02-2009, 12:07 AM
Finished Her Fearful Symmetry by Audrey Niffenegger of the Time Traveler's Wife's fame.
On one hand, it's perfectly creepy and timely for Halloween. I have to say I was entertained.

On the other, there are some very real character development problems. [spoiler] For instance, why is Julia portrayed as such as one-dimensional,

I read a review of the book a few days ago that said the same thing--there WAS no character development. It also said that nothing much happens for the first two thirds of the book and then everything happens too quickly and without a lot of clarity or reason in part because of the lack of character development.

slicekw
11-02-2009, 01:39 AM
I attended the Texas Book Festival (http://www.texasbookfestival.org/2009_Festival_Details.php) today. Quite a few of my coworkers told me that it was a must-go for me, given my reading habits. It was an incredibly beautiful day to be outside in Austin and I didn't sunburn!

I attended the following talks:
Kurt Eichenwald - The Informant
Republic of Barbecue: Stories Beyond the Brisket
Ellie Krieger
One of my coworkers that I like found me at the Barbecue session after I asked a question, and we went to Ellie together. A nice bonus.

All were very good sessions. I also enjoyed wandering the tents. McSweeney's was there, among other small publishers. The Barnes and Noble tent took my BN card, so that was nice. Sadly, they were out of the Barbecue books, but I can pick it up anytime (just not signed)

Ellie Krieger was very good, I was impressed at the nutritional thoughtfulness of the menu she presented and her answers to questions.

Kurt Eichenwald was amazing. He was just having a great time being there, talking about The Informant. It was mostly Q&A, so the questions ranged from what it was like to be a producer on the movie to a lot of discussion about Mark Whitacre, the subject of the book/movie. He swears that it's all true, that Mark loved the movie because he felt it told the truth. There's a web site that has a lot of the evidence from The Informant (http://www.theinformantbook.com).

IceAlisa
11-02-2009, 07:32 AM
I read a review of the book a few days ago that said the same thing--there WAS no character development. It also said that nothing much happens for the first two thirds of the book and then everything happens too quickly and without a lot of clarity or reason in part because of the lack of character development.

I wouldn't say nothing much happens in the beginning. I didn't feel at all that her pace was sluggish probably because I enjoy her style.

However, I have to agree that it felt that she was trying to meet a deadline when she rushed to wrap up the ending. And the ending is unworthy of her. I felt I didn't get to know the characters enough (or at all in some cases) to understand their actions and motivations.

KCC
11-02-2009, 01:10 PM
I just bought Margaret Atwood's new book, The Year of the Flood (audio version). I heard it has some interesting music that goes along with it.

isask8
11-02-2009, 06:44 PM
- delete -

zaphyre14
11-04-2009, 03:05 PM
I'm into light fare right now: Julia Quinn's Regency "What Happens in London" has a heroine who fits the "Too Stupid To Live" stereotype to a T and the plot has holes in it wider than the Thames is long, but it was a quick easy read.

I have Luann Rice's "Blue Moon" going on audio in the car. The characters were irritating at first but they're growing on me.

Next in line for home reading is Kathy Reichs' "206 Bones".

Buzz
11-05-2009, 12:58 PM
I am reading "City of Thieves" by David Benioff. Here is a link to an article about the book and author. http://nymag.com/arts/books/features/47040/
My next book will be "Spy Who Came In From The Cold" by John La Carre. Looks great and especially since it was also turned into a movie in the 60s.

Jenny
11-05-2009, 02:07 PM
I am reading "City of Thieves" by David Benioff. Here is a link to an article about the book and author. http://nymag.com/arts/books/features/47040/

Hubby, who shares many of your interests, enjoyed that one. On the non-fiction side, he's currently reading Anthony Beevor's new book on the Battle of Normandy, and loving it. He and Max Hastings are two of hubby's favourite WWII authors.

Satellitegirl
11-05-2009, 02:18 PM
Currently reading several books....I pick up one and read it a bit...put it down...read a bit of another...etc.

They're "Long Way Round" about Ewan McGregor and his friend's trip on motorcycles around the world.

The Count of Monte Cristo

The Demon Haunted World (Carl Sagan's book)

and Book 4 of the Sookie Stackhouse series :)

zhenya271
11-05-2009, 08:28 PM
[QUOTE=Buzz;2449236]I am reading "City of Thieves" by David Benioff. Here is a link to an article about the book and author. http://nymag.com/arts/books/features/47040/

I really enjoyed "City of Thieves". I wish there was more fiction out there on the Leningrad Blockade subject matter.

Holley Calmes
11-07-2009, 04:02 PM
Just bought "Pride and Prejudice and Zombies." Couldn't resist the cover illustration. Also the "Sense and Sensability and Sea Monsters" cover is a hoot, but I hear it's really bad. Anybody read these? I'm sure this might have been discussed up thread, but I must have missed it. I love satire, and I know it's silly, but I just love the concept. It's so funny when I tell people about it-so many are really offended. I even had one girl say it was "sacreligious." :rolleyes::lol:

I ordered something from the Victorian Trading Company and the girl who answered the phone said, "Welcome to Victorian Trading Company. Jane Austen speaking." I asked her how many zombies she had killed today. She thought I was crazy until I explained, and then she knew I was nuts. Jane Austin taking catalog phone orders......oh please.

rfisher
11-07-2009, 09:14 PM
I read JD Robb (aka Nora Roberts) latest Eve Dallas installment (Kindred in Death) today. Not one of my favorites but OK. There was more actual detecting in this one than usual and Roarke doesn't have to sedate Eve because she's working herself into the ground. Actually, we don't get much Roarke in the book apart from the token sex. However, I've been reading a book titled How Not to Murder Your Mystery. It's a writing guide and I found all sorts of issues with the book I'd normally just skip over. One that really annoyed me. Eve buys two Pepsis (I've always wondered if Pepsi pays NR for product placement): one for her and one for Morris the ME. Takes them into the autopsy suite (ewwwww) hands him one. She's still holding hers. Then Morris hands her a set of goggles, she shoves both hands in her pockets and then WIPES the pepsi tube across her forehead. You can't have something in your hand, do things that requires the use of said hands and still have the something in your hand. :drama: NR would have failed the writing criteria test.

I always marvel that I enjoy the Eve Dallas' books (did I mention I read the entire book today?) yet I can't stand her writing as Nora Roberts. :lol:

silverstars
11-07-2009, 10:39 PM
Just bought "Pride and Prejudice and Zombies." Couldn't resist the cover illustration. Also the "Sense and Sensability and Sea Monsters" cover is a hoot, but I hear it's really bad. Anybody read these? I'm sure this might have been discussed up thread, but I must have missed it. I love satire, and I know it's silly, but I just love the concept. It's so funny when I tell people about it-so many are really offended. I even had one girl say it was "sacreligious." :rolleyes::lol:

I read Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. It was surprisingly hilarious (I'm a bit of a Jane Austen fanatic, so for me to like it is pretty big--I generally hate it when other authors come in and try to make money by writing "in the style of" Austen), and I'd definitely recommend reading it for a laugh.

However, I've heard that the Sense and Sensibility version is pretty awful. I think that it's something that worked really brilliantly once because it as completely new and totally ridiculous, but doesn't work as well the second time because the novelty has kind of worn off.

shells
11-07-2009, 10:47 PM
Also, Sense & Sensibility and Sea Monsters was written by a different author. I imagine that has a lot to do with it too. The author that did PP&Z was signed by a different publisher to write Abraham Lincoln - Vampire Hunter.

At the suggestion of someone I met yesterday I am going to read How Starbucks Saved My Life.