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View Full Version : So Many Books, So Little Time (The Reading Thread)



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rfisher
10-19-2009, 08:03 PM
I just wish Adelia and the Bishop would get on with it. :lol: The *tension* between the two is getting annoying. She needs a new hottie.

pollyanna
10-19-2009, 08:05 PM
Sod the bishop, I'm interested in what Scarry is going to do in the next book. But yeah, they need to decide - is it a go or no?

Bev Johnston
10-19-2009, 09:08 PM
rfisher introduced me to Ariana Franklin, for which I shall be forever grateful. I love the character of Adelia, I love her friends, and I especially love that Franklin brings Henry II to life.

I just finished Grave Goods, which I loved more than The Serpent's Tale and almost as much as Mistress of the Art of Death. Clever and horrifying and well-researched as usual, Henry II wants Adelia to investigate whether or not King Arthur is really dead - are those his bones in the grave at Glastonbury?

I read Mistress of the Art of Death last fall and enjoyed it a lot. I had no idea there were sequels!

4dogknight
10-19-2009, 09:42 PM
II always check out authors that people post about that I haven't read yet. Ariana Franklin was one of those authors. I don't know if amazon.com.uk is more convenient for you but you can order and/or pre order her third (available in HC in UK now) and fourth book (pubbed in 2010) from them.

By the way Ariana Franklin is a pseudonym used by Diana Norman. And since Diana is British, the book titles are just a little different than the books released in the US. (Same problem with Cornwell)

Check the fantasticfiction site here (http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/f/ariana-franklin/) and here (http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/n/diana-norman/).

pollyanna
10-20-2009, 02:46 AM
I read Mistress of the Art of Death last fall and enjoyed it a lot. I had no idea there were sequels!

Isn't it wonderful when you discover there's more? :)

Nomad
10-20-2009, 03:50 AM
I'm currently reading Jeff Kinney's Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days. I actually bought it for my niece (a fourth grader who's read the first two in the series) but I'd finished my own book (Not So Quiet, Helen Zenna Smith) and still had an hour on the train to kill. It's pretty amusing, a combination of text and cartoons, which makes it a good choice for readers and reluctant readers alike.

jayta
10-20-2009, 01:18 PM
I love love luuuuurve anything by Francine Rivers. But I will caution those who might pick her up that she is somewhat of a Christian novelist. I personally don't think she's too heavy with the 'bible thumping'. She really integrates God into her books so that it's not like, 'you're damned to eternity without him' kind of thing.

So with that said, my FAVORITE and probably always will be would be a choice between Atonement Child and A Voice in the Wind series. They are beautifully written and totally angst. I love them to death.

If you have kids and would like to recommend some books to them, I think I'd recommend The Dark is Rising series by Susan Cooper. Absolutely great series for preteens and teens.

made_in_canada
10-20-2009, 04:23 PM
I love love luuuuurve anything by Francine Rivers. But I will caution those who might pick her up that she is somewhat of a Christian novelist. I personally don't think she's too heavy with the 'bible thumping'. She really integrates God into her books so that it's not like, 'you're damned to eternity without him' kind of thing.

So with that said, my FAVORITE and probably always will be would be a choice between Atonement Child and A Voice in the Wind series. They are beautifully written and totally angst. I love them to death.



To each their own... I read Atonement Child and found it incredibly preachy and condescending. Though to be fair, I'm not usually a fan of "christian" fiction.

IceAlisa
10-23-2009, 04:16 AM
I have my eye on Audrey Niffenegger's new book Her Fearful Symmetry. A lot of people say that it doesn't measure up to The Time Traveler's Wife which I loved.

Has anyone read it and would you say it's worth the time and $?

Also, picked up Julie Kramer's Stalking Susan in the bargain bin on Prancer's recommendation. I luurve me a good mystery. But while I don't consider myself a super sleuth, it was pretty darn obvious.
Girlfriend, please. You have a dog continuously snarling at a guy midway through the book and then have the temerity to say you didn't know who the killer was as you wrote the book? The dog knew, but you didn't, huh?

Prancer
10-23-2009, 05:14 AM
Also, picked up Julie Kramer's Stalking Susan in the bargain bin on Prancer's recommendation. I luurve me a good mystery. But while I don't consider myself a super sleuth, it was pretty darn obvious.

Er, I said I rather liked the writing and the investigative reporter setting, but knew whodunnit early on. That's a recommendation? :lol:

You're way too easy.

If you think she was dumb not to pick up on the clue in that book, don't read the sequel. You will want to smack her for being so stupid--and you will wonder how on earth she manages to be an award-winning investigative reporter when she is so shockingly dense and clearly can't see large, glowing CLUES right under her nose. And I'm not even talking about whodunnit, which is also screamingly obvious, but something else in the book that is so glaring that only someone dumb as a plug could miss it.

Which she does. REPEATEDLY.

I just finished The Pawn. (http://www.amazon.com/Pawn-Patrick-Bowers-Files-Book/dp/0800732405). I will say I didn't know whodunnit, but I was pretty meh about the book overall. My husband is reading it now, though, and he really likes it--and so does Harriet Klausner, so it must be good :lol:. Maybe now I can get The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo back, since he took that when I was somewhere in the second chapter and I haven't seen it since.

IceAlisa
10-23-2009, 08:13 AM
Er, I said I rather liked the writing and the investigative reporter setting, but knew whodunnit early on. That's a recommendation? :lol:

You're way too easy. Considering that I thought the opening pages were written in a crisp style, that it cost me less than $4 and that it was a good excuse to procrastinate on my day off instead of writing up my presentations, yes, you could say I am easy. :lol: Sometimes I think I would read the phone book instead of doing what I should be doing.



If you think she was dumb not to pick up on the clue in that book, don't read the sequel. You will want to smack her for being so stupid--and you will wonder how on earth she manages to be an award-winning investigative reporter when she is so shockingly dense and clearly can't see large, glowing CLUES right under her nose. And I'm not even talking about whodunnit, which is also screamingly obvious, but something else in the book that is so glaring that only someone dumb as a plug could miss it.

Which she does. REPEATEDLY.

If I see it for less than $5 I may still pick it up, read and then donate to our library at work. The front desk staff is already lusting after Stalking Susan. I could go to the library but with parking and gas it would probably add up to more.

That's where my copy of The Lovely Bones ended up btw. It disappeared within 10 minutes. :eek:

shells
10-23-2009, 01:43 PM
I just finished The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo. I wish the second book The Girl Who Played With Fire was out in paperback. Since I don't work at the bookstore anymore I am not buying hardcovers (plus I'll want my set to match). And my aunt tells me the third isn't due till sometime in 2010. Sadly I don't even know anyone at that publisher who might take pity on me and send me a copy.

I may re-read the last book in the House of Night series because the new one releases Tuesday and I will want to buy that.

jayta
10-28-2009, 04:21 AM
To each their own... I read Atonement Child and found it incredibly preachy and condescending. Though to be fair, I'm not usually a fan of "christian" fiction.

Personally I didn't think that it was preachy in that it isn't like, "YOU MUST keep the child" kind of thing. I do think it personalizes how the character's faith was a catalyst in why she chose to keep the child and brought up a subplot of how aborting a child does have an affect on a person. As much as sometimes we'd like to say, 'it's just a procedure and not a miracle' kind of thing.

I mean obviously my beliefs say a lot about what I think about how precious every life is and even from the very beginnings of it.

I haven't read it in a while, but as I remember it, I personally thought that I wouldn't mind recommending it to people who had no religious beliefs at all because it was just a well written story.

shells
10-28-2009, 10:35 AM
I went to the bookstore yesterday to buy Tempted (which is the latest in the House of Night series...I had the authors at my store last year and they are fantastic, I am a fan of them if not their writing), and was told that the new Luxe book (Splendor) came out that day. Good timing! I started it last night.

I will also be reading Pour Your Heart Into It by Howard Schultz. I hear reference made to it at least three times a week, so I figure I'd better read it so that I'm in the loop.

rfisher
10-28-2009, 10:42 AM
I have my eye on Audrey Niffenegger's new book Her Fearful Symmetry. A lot of people say that it doesn't measure up to The Time Traveler's Wife which I loved.

Has anyone read it and would you say it's worth the time and $?

]

The reviews weren't good. IMHO, you either have to nail literary fiction or it's crap. Genre fiction can be a lot more forgiving.

I got distracted from the Girl with the Dragon Tatoo. I got Gabaldon's and Brown's books (haven't finished either), then got distracted with the Reaper book and two or three others. Next week the new JD Robb comes out which will distract me again. I'm working my way back.

If anybody is tempted to buy The Magicians, don't.