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Garden Kitty
12-19-2012, 08:28 PM
There was a link in the article that Maofan7 posted that made me laugh - after winning SPOTY, Wiggins ends the night with a late night Big Mac at McDonalds (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/othersports/article-2249716/Bradley-Wiggins-McDonalds-winning-Sports-Personality-Year.html) :lol:

Garden Kitty
12-29-2012, 12:59 AM
Wiggins and Brailsford to be awarded Knighthoods (http://www.teamsky.com/article/0,27290,17546_8365400,00.html)

Garden Kitty
01-06-2013, 01:52 AM
Loved this Cyclingnews (http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/cycling-has-already-changed-says-schleck?ns_campaign=news&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_source =cyclingnews&ns_linkname=0&ns_fee=0) quote from Andy Schleck:
Schleck was also sceptical about Sky’s implementation of a “zero-tolerance” anti-doping policy during the off-season, which saw Bobby Julich and Steven De Jongh leave the management team after they confessed to doping during their riding careers.

“It’s their decision, but a guy like Bobby Julich, who admitted to using EPO but changed his attitude afterwards, should not be disowned. I know him for a long time. At Saxo Bank, he helped me a lot and he was one of the cleanest on the team. Everybody has the right to a second chance. Look at David Millar: he tested positive for EPO and today he does a lot for anti-doping.”

"one of the cleanest on the team" - Andy has such a way with words.

BittyBug
01-12-2013, 02:01 PM
Report: Lance Armstrong to admit to doping on Oprah Winfrey show (http://nbcsports.msnbc.com/id/50440376/ns/sports-cycling/)

:rolleyes:

Zemgirl
01-12-2013, 02:14 PM
Report: Lance Armstrong to admit to doping on Oprah Winfrey show (http://nbcsports.msnbc.com/id/50440376/ns/sports-cycling/)

If you look at his Twitter, it's obvious that he's setting up an admission - and I think I can guess how he'll present it, too. I guess I'll find out if I'm right soon enough ;)

BittyBug
01-12-2013, 06:05 PM
If this is true, it would define chutzpah.


Armstrong is coming forward to discuss his past doping because he wants to persuade officials to lift his lifetime ban from Olympic sports so he can return to competing in triathlons and running events, according to people with knowledge of his plans.

Source (http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/13/sports/cycling/lance-armstrong-will-confess-drug-use-to-oprah-winfrey-sources-say.html?hp)

orbitz
01-14-2013, 02:38 AM
Lance is rich enough that he should find something else to occupy his time other than competing triathlons. If he admits his guilt then he potentially opens himself to a host of lawsuits.

Oreo
01-15-2013, 12:09 AM
If this is true, it would define chutzpah.



Source (http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/13/sports/cycling/lance-armstrong-will-confess-drug-use-to-oprah-winfrey-sources-say.html?hp)

I wish he'd just go away.

Zemgirl
01-15-2013, 09:03 PM
I don't care how one views Lance Armstrong and his actions over the years, this (http://sports.yahoo.com/news/armstrong-admission-could-see-sport-dropped-olympics-194931896--oly.html) is not the right way to react to his admission. The answer to dealing with doping, in cycling or in any other sport, is not to preemptively kick everyone out of the Olympics and punish people who have always played by the rules. No. This is not the same as stripping members of relay teams of medals when one member is found to have doped. It's a slap in the face to every cyclist who works hard to train and race clean.

There are dopers in many sports, and WADA and the IOC should focus on finding them, not on punishing clean athletes. Otherwise you might as well kick everyone out of the Olympics, except maybe the shooters and archers.

Jenny
01-15-2013, 09:22 PM
I actually agree with Dick Pound on this one. If the athletes are guilty then other athletes should not be punished I agree; but if the governing body of the sport is found guilty of covering up actions that go against the Olympic movement, then the sport itself must pay.

The Olympics relies on sports federations to create standards and qualifying systems and define the rules of their sport - and to uphold the values of the Olympic movement, including a commitment to clean competition. I don't think an organization that does not uphold that standard should be allowed to participate in the Olympics. Plus, how can a federation like that be trusted to run a fair competition? This is for the moment assuming that the cycling union is complicit of course.

It's a shame for the athletes, but I don't see any other way to ensure that the competition is fair in the future.

Zemgirl
01-15-2013, 09:44 PM
I actually agree with Dick Pound on this one. If the athletes are guilty then other athletes should not be punished I agree; but if the governing body of the sport is found guilty of covering up actions that go against the Olympic movement, then the sport itself must pay.

The Olympics relies on sports federations to create standards and qualifying systems and define the rules of their sport - and to uphold the values of the Olympic movement, including a commitment to clean competition. I don't think an organization that does not uphold that standard should be allowed to participate in the Olympics. Plus, how can a federation like that be trusted to run a fair competition? This is for the moment assuming that the cycling union is complicit of course.

It's a shame for the athletes, but I don't see any other way to ensure that the competition is fair in the future.
Does the UCI run the competition and the doping testing at the Olympics? I don't think that the latter (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-19066937), at least, falls to them. And if the IOC and WADA weren't able to catch cycling dopers at the Olympics, what does that say about the sophistication of the people involved? My impression is that cycling has tried harder than most sports to address doping issues; that so many cyclists have been caught is not necessarily because the sport is dirtier but because they are tested. Baseball players, after all, were for the most part not caught during the height of the steroid era - and it was still an Olympic sport even when what was happening was becoming obvious and even after the Mitchell Report (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitchell_Report). What was going on in baseball was no less egregious.

I am absolutely against what is essentially a form of collective punishment - and this is based on stuff that's probably happened in the past, not necessarily now. If you want to demand that the people involved are kicked out of the UCI, that's one thing. But to ban an entire sport - to keep people like Bradley Wiggins and Chris Hoy out of the Olympics - is going too far. And IMO, it's more damaging than anything dopers can do.

But then, I am probably in the minority as I believe that anti-doping is in many ways an important goal, but it isn't an end that justifies all means - obviously it's a view Dick Pound doesn't share.

heckles
01-15-2013, 10:02 PM
I wish he'd just go away.

Give Lance some credit. It took a lot of ball for him to come clean.

my little pony
01-15-2013, 11:15 PM
Give Lance some credit. It took a lot of ball for him to come clean.

LOL!

DarrellH
01-16-2013, 02:55 PM
Give Lance some credit. It took a lot of ball for him to come clean.

LOL!

Seriously, I hope that they make good with all of those who had come forward before this. Those telling the truth, that were then sued and punished for it should have their reputations restored.

heckles
01-16-2013, 05:21 PM
I hope that they make good with all of those who had come forward before this.

I hope that we read more editorials such as this one in Washington Post (http://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/column-time-to-kill-off-myth-lance-armstrong-was-an-exceptional-athlete/2013/01/15/804364dc-5f67-11e2-9dc9-bca76dd777b8_story.html) that take on the myth that because "everyone" was allegedly doping in that period, Lance was still the best. We don't know that "everyone" was doping, and even if they had been, it doesn't mean that Lance didn't have the superior doping. I don't imagine that Lance generously shared every single doping secret with his competition in order to make it a level playing field.